StromTrooper banner

41 - 60 of 110 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
The pictures of the bike look great, love the color. I started on a Harley 883 right out of taking the MSF course and with no previous experience whatsoever. That bike was also 490lbs. Ended up having it for 20 years. Fewer HP but just as much torque. I needed the lower height but you don’t so if you are a responsible person the 650 sounds like a bike you could learn on and keep for a long time. The VStrom is like a Swiss Army knife, it is good for commuting and grocery shopping all the way to touring around the globe. And at a low cost to own. I’d say go with your instinct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,588 Posts
Yeah, I just don't want to get too bored of a small bike, I'm going to check out a cb500x on Tuesday when the bike shops open again. People on here think that one is a good starter so I'll go take a look at it.
When I do get a bike, I plan on taking to a parking lot and getting really familiar with it's weight and power. Hopefully I don't make a dumb decision haha.

I don't understand being bored on any bike. Even a small "under powered" bike is fun given the right circumstances. You're not in a cage (car) right?

I grew up riding dirt bikes so the mechanics of riding were ingrained in me. Meaning I didn't need to consciously think about shifting, braking, turning, etc. What I did need to learn was how to ride with traffic. I made several mistakes that looking back on them could have been serious if they had occurred in higher traffic areas.

As a new rider your attention will be divided between the bike and the other drivers. Do you have low traffic areas to ride in? You will make mistakes.

I recommend that every rider read David Hough: Proficient Motorcycling it discusses strategies for road riding.

Back to the original question!

A 650 Strom as a first bike? I wouldn't recommend it to my 18 year old self. It's quick enough to get away from your skill level. It is a much better choice than a sport bike though. A 650 KLR would be a good start I think. Yea it won't keep up with 80 mph traffic but a new rider shouldn't be in that situation IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #43
I don't understand being bored on any bike. Even a small "under powered" bike is fun given the right circumstances. You're not in a cage (car) right?

I grew up riding dirt bikes so the mechanics of riding were ingrained in me. Meaning I didn't need to consciously think about shifting, braking, turning, etc. What I did need to learn was how to ride with traffic. I made several mistakes that looking back on them could have been serious if they had occurred in higher traffic areas.

As a new rider your attention will be divided between the bike and the other drivers. Do you have low traffic areas to ride in? You will make mistakes.

I reccomend that every rider read David Hough: Proficient Motorcycling it discusses strategies for road riding.

Back to the original question!

A 650 Strom as a first bike? I wouldn't recommend it to my 18 year old self. It's quick enough to get away from your skill level. It is a much better choice than a sport bike though. A 650 KLR would be a good start I think. Yea it won't keep up with 80 mph traffic but a new rider shouldn't be in that situation IMO.
I guess, not being bored of it sounds immature, I just don't really want to go shopping a few years when I might want something more powerful, it seems like a lot of the people who get the lower cc bikes decide they want something more powerful after they learn most of the basics. My dad has the proficient motorcycling book that you mentioned, I never read it, I'll read it now though. sounds like an informative book to learn a lot about motorcycling in. Thanks for the reply. It's going to be a while before I buy a bike (still need the suit and gloves), so I will definitely check out all of the options out there.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,127 Posts
Had I started with a big bike I am sure that I would have trashed it. If you can, beg or borrow an old dirt bike and go ride it. That will teach you much on bike control for when things go wrong. It will save you heaps in repair bills, and possibly some skin as well.
I remember several incidents that would have ended badly for me had I not had dirt bike experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,588 Posts
I just don't really want to go shopping a few years when I might want something more...

Hah, I'll let you in on one of the basic truths of motorcycles:

You'll always want another/different one!

Just when you think you've found the one that you'll keep forever another bike will catch your eye.

Guaranteed!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I don't think it's a bad idea at all, I started on a versys 650. The cb500 is also a good idea, I would avoid anything smaller than 500cc though as you have a lot of 70 mph highways which means you need to go 80 comfortably. It's not like he's looking at an r6 or cbr600rr. Vtwin is fairly tame. I have a 1000 and have out the tall seat on it to be more comfy. I'm 6'1. Your own personal responsibility is the most important thing... Any upright standard twin is a solid starter bike... Abs highly underrated if you ride in the rain btw....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
542 Posts
Looking into these books by David Hough, has anybody read Mastering the Ride? Is this the updated version of the one Spec suggested?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Yea, ditto what Spec said. If you really get into riding more than just being a "bike owner", you will want various bikes in various points in your life.

If you can, get in cheap so you can turn over your purchase and try out other bikes. You have plenty of time to get that shiny new GS1200 or RSV4 later.

And as others have said, you will probably drop your first bike at least once. The taller and more unwieldy the bike is the more likely it will be in a parking lot or at a stop light. The more powerful it is, the more likely it will be from panicking in a turn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
I don't have much to add, but it's not like that's going to stop me! A buddy of mine got a Vstrom 650 for his first bike, and he did fine with it. Personally, I think it's taller and heavier than I'd want for a first bike, but on the plus side it's a bike that will do about anything you want, so you won't need to upgrade after your first year or two. The motor is fabulous, smooth and predictable, you can lug it all day in a parking lot or run down the interstate at 80 mph for hours. I also have an SV650, essentially the same motor but it needs a lot more clutch control at low speeds, really makes me appreciate the 'strom.

I'd say the Vstrom is OK for a beginner who has the strength and confidence to deal with it's heft, and the patience to handle a steeper learning curve. Not that it's huge, but my SV feels so svelte after riding the 'strom.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,683 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
I rode in my teens, nothing larger than a 350. I came back to riding in my 60's with a DL650, which was recommended to me by a good friend who has owned a lot of bikes for decades, mostly BMWs and Ducatis. He felt the Strom was a good value for the money, which it is, but I also think he was looking at it from the lens of a very experienced rider.

I don't think it was a good choice of a bike to get back into riding. It is too heavy, particularly too top heavy, and it has way too much engine for me to have started back riding with. I had some spills and close calls my first year. Thanks to riding AGATT and a lot of luck, I didn't hurt myself or the bike seriously, but I very well could have.

When I started riding again, I took the MSF basic rider course on a 250 and did really well. I came back for the refresher course on my DL650 and the same exercises were a lot harder with the bigger bike. I took the ARC course and did not do well the first time. I took it again a year later and did a lot better. I strongly recommend taking that course progression, not matter what you get.

Now after three years and over 10,000 miles, I'm at peace with the DL650. But I really wish I had started back on a 350-400, lighter bike and then worked my way up. Even today, if I'm riding around town, there are times I wish I had a smaller, lighter bike, but then when I'm on the highway, the size and weight doesn't matter and I'd be fine with an even bigger bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I think V-Strom is indeed very very good beginner bike.
Basically never rode a motorcycle in my life did 18 hours of driving school on Bandit 600 and bought Suzuki V-Strom 650 as my first bike.

- It has TCS what can be helpful in the rain / or if you pull the throttle to the sky, you wont be able to pull it on wheelie
- ABS on both wheels
- 19" first wheel
- Enough power to safely overtake car's and escape some situations ( Faster you finish overtaking safer you are imho ). If overtaking takes too long you are risking more.
- Stable on higher speeds and very decent on bumpy roads.

Have it 2 months so far, did 10k KM's and I am extremely happy with the driving abilities of the bike.
And it's not scary!

Overall everything what you get is perfect for what you need as starter.
After two months of riding I am def not sorry I got it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,918 Posts
I'd consider the new Versys 300 to be a better choice then the Vstrom 650. It's not your height, weight etc that scares me, it's your age. You feel invincible at that age and have a lack of driving experience. Someone who has driven a car for 20 years but still a new rider has much more experience then you do.. Get the 300, it's all you need. A guy on ADVRider just took one to Alaska on a month+ long trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,918 Posts
I think V-Strom is indeed very very good beginner bike.
Basically never rode a motorcycle in my life did 18 hours of driving school on Bandit 600 and bought Suzuki V-Strom 650 as my first bike.

- It has TCS what can be helpful in the rain / or if you pull the throttle to the sky, you wont be able to pull it on wheelie
- ABS on both wheels
- 19" first wheel
- Enough power to safely overtake car's and escape some situations ( Faster you finish overtaking safer you are imho ). If overtaking takes too long you are risking more.
- Stable on higher speeds and very decent on bumpy roads.

Have it 2 months so far, did 10k KM's and I am extremely happy with the driving abilities of the bike.
And it's not scary!

Overall everything what you get is perfect for what you need as starter.
After two months of riding I am def not sorry I got it.
Be careful, statistically you are more likely to have an accident now then at 0km riding experience :) Once the confidence goes up, the speed usually follows haha.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,683 Posts
Even today, if I'm riding around town, there are times I wish I had a smaller, lighter bike,
If you ride solo keep an eye for a CB500x down the road. SIgnificantly lighter, better fuel mileage, feels lighter too in handling. Just put 13k km on mine since June1 cross country and then two other multi -day trips. Same range as the Wee but about 15% better fuel mileage.
This review closed the deal for me http://www.mcnews.com.au/honda-cb500x-review-motorcycle-test/
First new bike in 50 years of riding.

I'm 72 in October.
I'd rather see the OP in a KLR650 and bashing about in the dirt for training.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
It was/is my first bike and it works for me. But height and weight is a concern, I'm 6' 3" and I could see it being a problem for someone much under 6' and it gets heavy fast when you start to lean over. I was told 650 was too much power, but even intentionally popping clutch I haven't gotten the front wheel off the ground much. That was my biggest concern as that's what I did while taking an intro class, causing me to perform a one handed wheelie, which was exciting, I just didn't want to do that at an intersection full of cars.

P.S. I like Yuumei's art. But I suppose that's not meant to be in this thread. Good luck on picking out a motorcycle, V-stroms are good, but pick what's best for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Agreed get what feels right. It is a big bike and being under 6 feet and less than 180 pounds I took 3 hours just sitting on it and walking it around to get comfortable with its weight and balance. Then I took the MSF course to learn some handling. I took my first ride on it today about 2 miles to get it from one house to another. It's big and can get away from you especially in a panic. But I felt more stable and smooth on it than the CB300F I rode for the MSF course.

If you can find one sit on it, do that before you get anything. Then decide on something you will feel confident on and ride safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Isn't this one of the best forums ever? So many people willing to chime in. Can you tell we love our V-Stroms? They are so reliable, affordable, predictable power, and plenty enough power and good gas mileage, a heavy duty frame so if you want to put on luggage you can and also for a passenger, for commuting, touring and gravel roads, fire roads, too. They are just so versatile! A Wee makes the perfect first street bike for someone with dirt bike experience, or the perfect 2nd bike.

I say the Ninja 250 would be the perfect first bike! They sell for pretty cheap too, about $1000 is pretty common. Since they are popular and cheap it would be easy to sell later and get a V-Strom if that's what you want.

I'd go with the Ninja 250 unless you know yourself and are really good with self control.

The only benefits of the DL650 for a new rider is you may never have to buy another bike, as well as it being versatile compared to the Ninja 250.

What would you be using the bike for? How many miles? How fast?
 
41 - 60 of 110 Posts
Top