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Am I reading my owner's manual correctly? I should shift from 5th to 6th gear around 37 mph? Really? Page 5-4 of my 2012 DL1K's owner's manual says that is where I should shift from 5th to 6th.

My bike likes to shift at about 4.5k rpms. At 35 mph in 5th gear, the rpms would be way below that.
 

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Am I reading my owner's manual correctly? I should shift from 5th to 6th gear around 37 mph? Really? Page 5-4 of my 2012 DL1K's owner's manual says that is where I should shift from 5th to 6th.

My bike likes to shift at about 4.5k rpms. At 35 mph in 5th gear, the rpms would be way below that.
I have a 2009 Vee. I up shift at 4000rpm and down shift at 3000 rpm excluding 6th gear. For 6th gear I down shift into 5th at 4000 rpm, otherwise I feel the motor is laboring. You will burn a bit more gas but the bike is more responsive.

Brian
 

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Am I reading my owner's manual correctly? I should shift from 5th to 6th gear around 37 mph? Really? Page 5-4 of my 2012 DL1K's owner's manual says that is where I should shift from 5th to 6th.

My bike likes to shift at about 4.5k rpms. At 35 mph in 5th gear, the rpms would be way below that.
Sometimes at 3000 RPM, maybe (I never look at that), and sometimes at 7000 or 8000 RPM. Depend on the situation.

I don't look at speedometer either to decide shifting. It's just feeling... like most do, people I guess.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The manuals lists minimums, and it would take a perfectly tuned engine at that. Anywhere between those listed and red line would be available shift points with the lower points for economy and the higher points for power.
 

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Wind it up. It's easier for smooth shifting at higher RPMs to get the engine in its upper range. Easier to not close the throttle but just ease back on it, as you snick into the next gear, toe and clutch hand in one motion.

The 1-2 shift I usually make at around 3000 RPM, but beyond that I wind it. I use my ear, not the speedometer, but if I'm trying to get ahead of traffic, I'll get up to highway speeds in 2 or 3.

For cruising, I use this rule:

Under 10 - 1

10-20 - 2

20-30 - 3

30- 45 - 4

...and so on. You can feel, again, when it's lugging too much. Use your gears! The electronic ignition has a rev limiter...it's not especially good to jam it against the redline but you won't ruin it if you do it once in awhile. You'll hear and feel it before then and can check your tach.
 

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aka Rick in Alabama
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Sometimes at 3000 RPM, maybe (I never look at that), and sometimes at 7000 or 8000 RPM. Depend on the situation.

I don't look at speedometer either to decide shifting. It's just feeling... like most do, people I guess.
+1

I discovered breaking the bike in that the 5k rpm limit allowed plenty of room and oomph for my usual commuter route. I was careful to mind the stated limits for the break-in period.

However, after the break-in period my shifting became a more complex mix of power needed in relationship to road grade, traffic flow, and safety.

And not to forget, the posted speed limit. :fineprint:
 

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The manuals lists minimums, and it would take a perfectly tuned engine at that. Anywhere between those listed and red line would be available shift points with the lower points for economy and the higher points for power.

This bike gives you an incredibly wide range to indulge your mood. It's fine (not lugging) as long as it accelerates nicely in the next gear. In between the extremes you can just divide your speed by 10 and run in that gear --- e.g. 4th at 45 mph.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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The manuals lists minimums, and it would take a perfectly tuned engine at that. Anywhere between those listed and red line would be available shift points with the lower points for economy and the higher points for power.
Yep. I don't know where those ridiculous fictional shift speed recommendations in the manuals come from or what obscure legal requirement they fulfill, but they can, should, and must be ignored.



Wind it up. It's easier for smooth shifting at higher RPMs to get the engine in its upper range.
Yep -- grip it and rip it. >:)
 

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This bike gives you an incredibly wide range to indulge your mood. It's fine (not lugging) as long as it accelerates nicely in the next gear. In between the extremes you can just divide your speed by 10 and run in that gear --- e.g. 4th at 45 mph.


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That's the formula I use, just divide your speed by 10 and run in that gear...
 

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I know back in the 70's and 80's roll on acceleration was a big deal. and basically it was how much mojo
did your bike have when you just twisted the throttle without down shifting as in 5th gear roll on .
They used 40 mph to say 60 mph as the timing figures. I can tell you I have tried this technique on my
New bike. Even though still going through break in ( 1/4 of the way there now ) The 5th gear roll on
is very brisk. I can let it lope along in 5th at about 2000 rpm and just gradually open the throttle and
she will just gain speed like shot out of a rocket. and in just a few seconds your at 80 mph.
Lots of small displacement motorcycles don't have much bottom end. Even many of the sport bikes
don't make serious power unless the tach needle swings past 8 or 9K rpm. Some higher than that.
This Vstrom has the V twin power down low but still has an upper power band that pulls really good.
It's hard to find a bike that does both well. These bikes we own do it very well.:wink2:
 
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