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I recently went to a riding course taught by a former racer. He encouraged us to not use our clutch when up-shifting. He taught us to blip off the throttle briefly and then shift up.
He did say to continue to use the clutch when down shifting.
It seems to work fine but takes a bit of getting used to.
Anyone see a downside to this?
 

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I don't see a downside if done properly and if nothing else being able to shift without the clutch might get you home if you break a clutch lever or clutch cable[it did for me!]

When I first read your post I thought you were saying to "blip" the throttle when upshifting... I missed the word "down" after blip.

To be clear you back of the throttle as you upshift.

Downshifting can also be done without the clutch. It requires a bit more coordination and does require a little "blip" of the throttle so that the revs match.

If you are shifting smoothly with the clutch and are not slipping the clutch then essentially the clutch isn't doing anything anyway.

..Tom
 

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Good practice, and as stated means that if your clutch lever/ cable breaks you are not stuck or too traumatised.
 

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I cannot say I recommend it for daily use. Pulling in the clutch lever allows a no load hookup of the gears. If you don't get it just right there is the chance of chipping or mushrooming the edge of the shift dogs. New BMW's have "shift assist" where you simply stab the shifter, either up or down, and it shifts without the clutch lever being used. They obviously have that all figured out. But can you repeat the perfect sequence each time? Yes, It is not all that unusual for me to upshift without the clutch. Like when I am picking my nose with the left hand or just being lazy. Or when hammering the bike. But not every time........
 

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I recently went to a riding course taught by a former racer. He encouraged us to not use our clutch when up-shifting. He taught us to blip off the throttle briefly and then shift up.
He did say to continue to use the clutch when down shifting.
It seems to work fine but takes a bit of getting used to.
Anyone see a downside to this?

The downside for me is that I have to think about not using the clutch!
 

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A common practice with dirt bikes. Never hurt a thing.
On dirt there is give in the rear tire that serves as cushion. I always shifted without a clutch on my dirt bike. When standing it can be harder to access the clutch lever.
On the street, the chance of causing excess wear isn't worth it. Most people aren't that good at meshing gears.
 

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On dirt there is give in the rear tire that serves as cushion. I always shifted without a clutch on my dirt bike. When standing it can be harder to access the clutch lever.
On the street, the chance of causing excess wear isn't worth it. Most people aren't that good at meshing gears.

All the gears in the transmission are meshed all the time except in neutral. Neutral just un-meshes (?) the output shaft gear. Gears are selected with a shift fork and dogs that slot into the gears. The dogs need a momentary release of pressure to move in and out of the slots. Clutch of blip of the throttle will do it.

 

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Works fine. All the "new" shift assist features do is interrupt the ignition of the bike for a split second to make for smooth clutchless shift. I rode an MV Brutale with the feature and all it was is a microswitch inline with the shift rod.

You can buy kits that do this same thing using a button on the bars. Real popular with drag bike. Hit the switch and the unit interrupts the ignition and a servo shifts for you. Kind of a low tech version of something like Yammie's FJR-AE
 

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Spec- Yes I understand how a constant mesh transmission works..Saying gear instead of "dog" was just meant to mean a gear change without complicating the matter. Improper or forced meshing will cause extra wear no matter what kind of transmission it is.
Kawasakis had some problem with popping out of gear with this kind of abuse.
 
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