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Hey Riders,
Question? I rode my '14 1000 today on the highway, and the bumps in the road felt wierd. In addition, the bike felt "bouncy". My dealer installed a new Shinko 705 rear this past weekend to replace the old one with 4000 miles. I put about 700 miles on the tire this past weekend on dirt and road, with no problem. I just checked the air, and it read 45 pounds. I believe the correct pressure is 42. Could a pressure of 45 pounds make the bike jumpy on bumps, and feel bouncy? I put the bike on a rear lift, and could not find anything loose. It has a relatively new chain and sprokets. A visual inspection of the tire and rim yielded nothing. Could a higher than normal tire pressure do this? If so, it had to be the dealer, and I will check with them tomorrow.:confused:
 

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I don't exceed 38 rear and 34 front on my 705's.......
 

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Thanks Big B,
I think the dealer put 45 pounds of air for sure, as I didn't touch the tire since it was installed. I assumed it had the correct air pressure.

I let out some air, and will go for a ride and check it. Thanks
 

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Embarrased to say, but I JUST checked the recommended tire pressure on my 705's. Front 33 psi, rear 42 psi. For some reason, I had the front at 38 and the rear at 45 psi. The rear pressure was the dealer's fault, the front psi mine. I must be thinking to my road bike days, when I pushed the limit on the road tires to get better rolling. Haven't had time to ride after adjusting the psi downward on front and rear, but wil check tomorrow. Americade in town, and the roads are crazy busy with bikers.
 

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Thanks Big B,
I think the dealer put 45 pounds of air for sure, as I didn't touch the tire since it was installed. I assumed it had the correct air pressure.

I let out some air, and will go for a ride and check it. Thanks
I have read accounts of riders not checking air pressure when tire service was done and had bad outcomes. The fact is, it's on YOU to check the tire pressures after service. Why in the world would you leave that simple task up to someone not riding on two hoops filled with air? Seriously, it's a pre-ride check item...you know that
 

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For what it's worth, here's a link to Shinko's website that lists the recommended tire pressures for all the sizes in the 705 line. Looks like I've been using the wrong tire pressure in mine.....

705 Series | Shinko Tire USA
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have read accounts of riders not checking air pressure when tire service was done and had bad outcomes. The fact is, it's on YOU to check the tire pressures after service. Why in the world would you leave that simple task up to someone not riding on two hoops filled with air? Seriously, it's a pre-ride check item...you know that
Thanks for your concern. The tire pressure was not the problem. I blew the rear shock, and that was the reason for the bike acting funny. I am in the process of replacing the
shock.
 

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I was surprised that, for the size tires on my Yamaha (110/80R19 and 150/70R17), Shinko specifies a max air pressure of 42 PSI in both the front and the rear. All this time I've been running them at 36 front and 40 rear. I'm not even sure now where I got those numbers from, other than I had them written down on my reference sheet for the bike.
 

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"Maximum" air pressure is not necessarily the recommend pressure to run in them. Maximum is the pressure rating to obtain the tires maximum LOAD rating. Unless you are at maximum load, less pressure may in fact be better all around.
 

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"Maximum" air pressure is not necessarily the recommend pressure to run in them. Maximum is the pressure rating to obtain the tires maximum LOAD rating. Unless you are at maximum load, less pressure may in fact be better all around.
LOL realshelby, between me, gear, and my passenger, I'm pretty much always pegged at maximum load.
 

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I just got a new set of Shinko's mounted and I was thinking , Zow these really feel good compared to the 17K mile front I just took off. The rear got changed early in prep for a trip. Only 4K miles on that one.
Typical 36/40 when loaded. The sticker on the '05 bike frame says 33/36 solo, 33/41 dual.
 

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Thanks for your concern. The tire pressure was not the problem. I blew the rear shock, and that was the reason for the bike acting funny. I am in the process of replacing the
shock.
As I read through this thread I was going to suggest checking your suspension, as I'd had a similar bouncing problem a while back. I looked all over, checked the runout on the wheels, had the tires remounted and rebalanced (also Shinko 705s), and still had the bounce. Turns out the preload on the front of the bike was set too high after an insurance-claim rebuild by a local Honda/Suzuki dealer. Backing out the preload a notch settled the bike nicely.

Absolutely my own fault for not checking this earlier on, but lesson learned. The 705s are awesome tires, so happy riding!
 

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recommended tire pressure is just that. You need to ride your bike and see what works for you. Take your weight, load and surface conditions into account. Experiment a bit and see what works for you. I run 705's at 34 front 36 rear unloaded and 36/38 respectively when loaded up on pavement. When off road in loose conditions I have been known to run em down to 20-24 front and rear. Keep in mind you NEED a inflation device, of some kind, to reinflate when you hit the hardball. Also keep in mind that at low pressure your rims are more at risk for damage and ride accordingly. Suspension set up is, also, very important. Correct spring rate, for your weight/load, and set up make a big difference. If you don't know how to do this find someone who does. A bike, properly, set up is so much easier and fun to ride. Just my 2c!
 

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As I read through this thread I was going to suggest checking your suspension, as I'd had a similar bouncing problem a while back. I looked all over, checked the runout on the wheels, had the tires remounted and rebalanced (also Shinko 705s), and still had the bounce. Turns out the preload on the front of the bike was set too high after an insurance-claim rebuild by a local Honda/Suzuki dealer. Backing out the preload a notch settled the bike nicely.

Absolutely my own fault for not checking this earlier on, but lesson learned. The 705s are awesome tires, so happy riding!
I wish that was my problem, but the rear shock bit the dust after 30,000 miles of great riding. A fellow stromtrooper/advrider is sending me his OEM rear shock, as he upgraded to an aftermarket shock. Should be up and running in about 7-10 days.
 
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