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I have heard there is a better way.

I had been using the soft Canyon Dancer straps, but they scrunch the grips. So I bought the Canyon Dancer with the hard cups, they bent the bar end caps.

I have heard there is a way to hook onto the fork under the cowling. Where exactly would I hook the straps and do I need some kind of special strap?
 

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I hook my straps directly to my givi crash bars up front and in the back to the frames for my jesse's.

IIRC the straps can go up inside the fairing and hood to the bars close to the clamps. I haven't done this for a while and then only did it once or twice so my memory could be wrong.
 

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Front straps to crash bars and rear straps to luggage attachment hardware is the way to go. Don't even put straps on the grips, especially the throttle side. Too many moving parts to break up there. The Givi bars make fantastic attachment points up front.
 

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You can avoid compressing the suspension for tie-down. Instead you can pick parts "below" the suspension and use them. At the forks I connect on the lower tubes where the fender mounts. At the back I connect to the swingarm. If you can add a third pair on the rider pegs, all the better.

FWIW: I learned this method unpacking Harleys when I worked at a dealership. This is how they secured the bikes in their shipping crates. We got free racheting tie downs too! :D
 

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I have been using soft straps just above the triple fork with easy access under the fairing. I use soft straps on the lower footpeg mounting brackets for the rear. I will have to try attaching on the lower tube and see how that works. Don't tie down on the grips, to much wiggle and stuff to break.
 

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You can avoid compressing the suspension for tie-down.
I always thought you were specifically SUPPOSED to compress the suspension when securing a motorcycle for transport?

When I picked up my Wee I had to trailer it home, and the guys at the dealer went up under the faring and over the tripple clamp on the forks in the front. Said that was all I would need, but went ahead and put some tie downs on the luggage rack in the rear to prevent side to side movement.
 

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I have heard there is a better way.

I had been using the soft Canyon Dancer straps, but they scrunch the grips. So I bought the Canyon Dancer with the hard cups, they bent the bar end caps.
Hindsight is always 20/20, isn't it?

You should have asked us before tying the bike down, I would have told you to never tie a bike down by the handlebars.
The bars bending can make your bike fall off the truck/trailer/platform.

The other sensible ting to do is to leave the sidestand deployed if you want, but the bike's weight should not be on it. Sidestands bend just as easily as handlebars.

Oh, while I'm on sidesatands: it is not recommended to leave the luggage packed and attached to the bike; that's going to bend the stand over time.

To answer your question, you can loop hooks over the lower triple tee.
Another thing you can do is to clamp the front wheel down if you have the equipment.
 

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You can avoid compressing the suspension for tie-down. Instead you can pick parts "below" the suspension and use them. At the forks I connect on the lower tubes where the fender mounts. At the back I connect to the swingarm. If you can add a third pair on the rider pegs, all the better.

FWIW: I learned this method unpacking Harleys when I worked at a dealership. This is how they secured the bikes in their shipping crates. We got free racheting tie downs too! :D
Our bikes are so tall with so much weight up high that I don't feel good about lashing only low on the bike. There is just too much weight above the lashing point. I use the crash bars in front plus light tension on the bars for stability. In the rear I use the rack behind the seat. Be sure there is adequate fore & aft lashing so if you have to make an emergency hard stop the bike stays behind you in the trailer and doesn't try to join you up front.
 

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I've hauled many bikes over the years from vintage Triumphs to Harleys and have never had a problem with compressing the suspension. I recently took my Vee to Canada to ride SE BC with a friend who lives in Castlegar. As can be seen in the picture, my Nissan Titan allows for multiple tie down points. However, the two straps affixed to the crash bars (I dislike that term) were sufficient to secure the bike. It is good to have some straps attached toward the rear to prevent side to side movement just in case one gets into some bad terrain or hits a bump/hole etc.

I have a chock but a piece of plywood up against the front of the bed with 4"x4" attached to it and on either side of the tire also works. In fact that is how I'd do it next time. I just wanted to try out the chock.





I compress the forks, not too much, by sitting on the bike and pulling up on the front securing straps.
 

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I have been using soft straps just above the triple fork with easy access under the fairing. I use soft straps on the lower footpeg mounting brackets for the rear. I will have to try attaching on the lower tube and see how that works. Don't tie down on the grips, to much wiggle and stuff to break.
Bingo!

Just picked up my Wee this afternoon and did exactly that. Rented a U-haul motorcycle trailer with a vee front, took the "S" on the straps up through the fork, then back down to the tie down. Compressed the forks about a third, then one strap through the rear wheel and slightly back. No problems. If I went further, I would have slapped three and four on the foot pegs and Bob's not my uncle. :beatnik:
 

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I've hauled many bikes over the years from vintage Triumphs to Harleys and have never had a problem with compressing the suspension. I recently took my Vee to Canada to ride SE BC with a friend who lives in Castlegar. As can be seen in the picture, my Nissan Titan allows for multiple tie down points. However, the two straps affixed to the crash bars (I dislike that term) were sufficient to secure the bike. It is good to have some straps attached toward the rear to prevent side to side movement just in case one gets into some bad terrain or hits a bump/hole etc.

I have a chock but a piece of plywood up against the front of the bed with 4"x4" attached to it and on either side of the tire also works. In fact that is how I'd do it next time. I just wanted to try out the chock.





I compress the forks, not too much, by sitting on the bike and pulling up on the front securing straps.
You are stressing the crash bars which in turn are stressing the frame. They ARE strong enough, but why not through the forks? The frame and the frame point are designed for the worst kinds of loads other then a front end collision.

Just my two pennies worth....
 
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