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Having been a Triumph owner for one and a half seasons I have gotten proficient at transporting a bike in the back of a truck. :lol: Ok, I've loaded my share of other bikes. So anywho, here are some things that work well for me.

1. Build yourself a wheel chock to isolate your front wheel from moving. If your front wheel moves your straps can come loose. I built this one out of 2X4s and 2X6s. It will hold the bike upright all by itself. I added another 2X4 with some eye bolts to make a couple more tiedown locations. In retrospect I would have used a longer 2X6 in the front and put eye bolts in it.



2. Park your truck on a (relatively) level surface but back it up to a slight incline if possible. This will reduce the angle of the ramp. The longer the ramp is, will also help here. You want the ramp to be kind of wide also. At least 2 feet. I built this one out of two sheets of 3/4 plywood glued together with 2X4 braces. There is no flex but it is heavy.


3. Some people swear by the ratcheting tiedowns and others say the cam type are fine. I use both and they both work great. Other people really like the Canyon Dancer type of strap that makes the hand grips into tiedown points. Ive never used one and with a little imagination I dont think they are necessary. What ever type you use, or wherever you attach them, I always put one ratcheting on the rear tire like this. It hooks to one side of the back of the bed then loops around the tire and wheel then ratchets tight on the other side.


Lastly get at least one person to help you load and unload the bike and remember to put up the kickstand before going up or down the ramp. :wink:
 

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Ben, Great idea on the chock. I've always used the ratchet type straps . I also wrap the strap around the wheel/tire BUT here's where I differ . I always load the bike rear first.. I can load from the incline by the garage , & If I have to unload alone it makes it easier if I can roll it off while astride the Bike ...
I copy'd the chock photo to reproduce one for me. Ride safe, Jack
 

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Hi, longtime lurker, and I'm going tomorrow to pick up my brand new '06 Vee! I'm in the process of making something similar to what is shown above, but I'm not sure how wide to make the space for the front wheel to fit. If I understand tire sizes, the first number (110) is the width in millimeters, meaning about 4.5".

Now, when I did a search, someone here said the front tire is 4" at its widest. Can anyone measure their front tire width to verify this? It seems that the best thing would be a slightly snug fit, but it would be bad to not be able to get the tire into the space. Thanks for any help or suggestions anybody can give me!
 

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Four-and-a-quarter, sir!

Make your gap 4.25 inches, and you will be spot on. I measured carefully with high quality calipers.

My Trailwings have 12000 miles on them, but the widest parts have not yet been used. I kinda stay upright, so the parts I measured have the little black threads intact.

The front tire on my Wee-Strom is 110/80R19. I do not know if the liter machine has a different tire.

Good luck!
 

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Anybody use one of these?

http://www.motorcycleramps.com/black_widow.htm

I like the fact that it's wide enough to put your feet down while riding the bike on and off (for single-person loading/unloading).

It's kinda on my wishlist, not so much for the Wee but for trucking my XR a little further afield.


- Martin
I've looked at these ramps longingly too. We'd like to replace the wooden aluminum framed ramps we presently use with our motorcycle trailer.

One thing I might point out. The advertisment always shows the motorcycle and rider successfully at the top of the ramp but fail to point out that there is a certain point (at the midway point of when your front wheel is going up the ramp and when your rear tire is still on the ground) that your feet will no longer touch the ground, unless you're quite long legged. You're going to have to ride up the the ramp to get through that spot. I'm 5'5" but even Kayakman who's 5'9" can't reach the ground in that spot. It helps if the truck or trailer is parked in a low spot so that the angle of the ramp isn't quite so steep. At home, we park the trailer in a shallow ditch and look for small hills to load on when travelling.
 
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