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This morning I went to adjust my chain slack which I have not done for the last 3000 odd miles. Got the tools out figured a few minutes to take care of it........

After several squirts of pb blaster and a cheater bar I managed to finally remove the axle nut revealing totally trashed axle shaft threads and stripped axle nut :confused:

I did adjust the chain perhaps 3-4 times when the bike was getting broken in and consider myself better than shade tree mechanic what happened here?

At minimum I am looking at close to $100 in new parts has this happened to any fellow stromtroopers?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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That's the first case I've heard of on a late model bike. There was a rash of that around 2005-6. I've long recommended using anti seize to prevent galling and using 58lb-ft instead of the specified 72-5lb-ft to make up for the lubrication effect of the anti seize compound. I am surprised the larger area, hence lower pressure, connection of the Fuji nut rather than the old castellated and cottered nut galled. Improper heat treatment is often the underlying cause.
 

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I have a brand new axle and a new Dale Walker aftermarket nut/washer I'll send you for $70, shipped.

Long story, but when it happened to me in 2006, axles were in short supply and I ended up with an extra.

Axle is part number 64711-03F10
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the offer of the axle shaft but I have already ordered a new one through the local dealer.

I will put a couple pictures up when I can its interesting the way it failed I've seen stripped/cross threaded threads before but this looks like the actual threads peeled of the axle shaft.

I guess stuff happens just hate its costing $105 in parts to fix plus I am having a hard time believing I cranked down on the nut that hard last time I adjusted the chain.

I will follow the advice on the anti seize and recalabrate my tight is good torque via feel method.
 

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I will put a couple pictures up when I can its interesting the way it failed I've seen stripped/cross threaded threads before but this looks like the actual threads peeled of the axle shaft.
Yeah, the damage shows up when you try to loosen. There were a rash of these problem in 2006 or so. Suzuki blamed it on axles not properly heat treated.
 

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That's the first case I've heard of on a late model bike. There was a rash of that around 2005-6. I've long recommended using anti seize to prevent galling and using 58lb-ft instead of the specified 72-5lb-ft to make up for the lubrication effect of the anti seize compound.
My 2009 wee has the new-style nut which is NOT castellated. Would you still "recommended using anti seize" given that it may compromise the safety?

Lets not forget that even automobile lug-nutz are supposed to be "dry". The use of any lube is strictly vorbotton.
 

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Thanks for the offer of the axle shaft but I have already ordered a new one through the local dealer.

I will put a couple pictures up when I can its interesting the way it failed I've seen stripped/cross threaded threads before but this looks like the actual threads peeled of the axle shaft.

I guess stuff happens just hate its costing $105 in parts to fix plus I am having a hard time believing I cranked down on the nut that hard last time I adjusted the chain.

I will follow the advice on the anti seize and recalabrate my tight is good torque via feel method.
Don't consider this your fault for having torqued the nut too tight. These nuts have a history of galling. The metal in the nut actually becomes one with the axle. When you try to take it off you are actually breaking the "cold weld" that has formed. I believe it is a result of manufacturing quality. Two things that will make a nut gall are; a dull tap being used to cut the thread, and the thread being cut too fast. Both of these situations occur randomly in manufacture and make the thread rougher which causes more friction. Nuts are tapped and bolt thread is rolled. Rolling is smoother than tapping. Galling occurs because of friction in any nut that has alloys in it. The alloys form an oxide that protects the nut from rusting, but make it's surface friction even higher, aggravating the tendency to gall.
As greywolf said, moly lube is the cure.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I have a late model axle nut and I use anti seize. The sheet metal grabber on the Fuji nut still works fine. It isn't going anywhere.
 

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Lets not forget that even automobile lug-nutz are supposed to be "dry". The use of any lube is strictly vorbotton.
Do you know how many wheel studs I've broken off in the past 45+ years because the nutz were rusted on solid? I grease them the first time I take them off and have done so ever since the first stud broke.

The past few years, I've started greasing the wheel hubs as well.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Of late, lugs and nuts are coated. If an overly aggressive impact wrench compromises the coating or I'm working on an old uncoated lug, I'll use anti seize. I believe the warning against anti seize is not about it causing the nut to loosen but it causing the nut to be torqued too much. When using anti seize, I'll reduce the torque to 80% of the spec, as in the reduction from 72.5lb-ft to 58lb-ft as previously mentioned.
 

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GW, which anti-seize do you use? Copper, Aluminum, ect.? Any chance it will cause corosion (from the effect of dissimilar metals)
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I have a tube of Molybdenum based stuff older than some stromtroopers. Dissimilar metals corrosion needs a metal to metal contact and usually moisture plus the metals need to have differing levels of activity. It's not a problem.
 

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I've used Coppercoat on all studs, nuts, spark plug threads etc. for years without a problem. Not using it just seems wrong :confused:
 

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I have a tube of Molybdenum based stuff older than some stromtroopers. Dissimilar metals corrosion needs a metal to metal contact and usually moisture plus the metals need to have differing levels of activity. It's not a problem.
makes sense. thanks
With the anti-seize and less torque, it would beasier to get the nut off on the road also.
 

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I noticed the DL's axle threads appeared less than 1st class, I believe they were in fact cut with a dull die. I realize rolling is the norm for external threads but where an axle is hollow I believed "cutting" is the choosen method.
At any rate, if the castle nut's "effective" width wasn't so narrow it prolly wouldn't be an issue with the "somewhat rough cut" axle threads. Put those together though, (along with no lube... a bad idea IMO), and you get occasional failures.

The appearance of that narrow castle nut told me to de-rate Suzuki's torque spec. though I too back down some when it's lubed with something.

I have Never-Seize brand goop, it's a silver color, but really any variety will do fine. They have several, including food grade. If your inclined to lick your nuts.:green_lol:
 

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Anti Seize

I replaced castle nut with newer and use anti-seize (some old Napa stuff I have had for years) and lower torque and no movement. slick setup with nut on left side.

Regarding anti seize I used to religiously use anti seize on spark plugs in alum heads for years but on my 06 Vstrom I had NGK iridium spark plug loosen (used 80% torque spec – not sure if me or dealer did at valve adjust). Then, Greywolf noted to me that NGK did not recommend anti seize on plugs so on my 07 I put the iridium plugs in dry to the torque spec.

I have to admit that with such a low torque setting for our Vstrom plugs that I think my prior anti seize/loosening issue may just have been that low torque spec reduced 80% was low (I use inch-lbs wrench of course) as my original factory plug on 07 came off so easy it gave me the creeps. I have to admit that as long as the irridiums may last I am not sure if dry plug will be an issue at that time – hope not.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks guys,

following the advice I used copper based anti seize and using my new torque wrench set the axle nut at 60lb no problems now although I am gun shy after spending $105 in parts and $85 for the tq wrench......

I had to wait almost two weeks for the axle shaft to come in which I later found for $23 cheaper online :thumbdown:
 
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