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I come from Harleys, and a turn of the throttle started a relatively gradual and predictable increase in speed or power to the ground - but on this 07 DL1000 the first few millimeters of turn make a big difference. It's almost unmanagable at low speeds, especially standing up going over rough terrain. Granted, I'm new to the bike AND the riding style, but it seems that a less touchy throttle (at least in the first increments of movement) would be a desirable thing. Anybody else looked into this?
 

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Do not remove your secondary throttle plates.

Don't know how to desensitize the throttle response any more than stock though.
 

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touchy throttle

I have a 650, and found the same thing to be true. The FI is very abrupt coming off idle.

My searching and reading told me that I should check the throttle position sensor, the adjustment of the throttle cables, and the throttle body sync. None of those were relevant to the issue on mine. I did discover, though, that it's much less problematic at high RPM. When rolling on power in a curve, there is far less "jerk" at 5500+ than at 4000. Since I won't spend much time below 5000 in the twisties anyway, and the clutch masks the problem in town, it hasn't been much of an issue for me in practice. However, I haven't done much rough terrain yet.

I suspect that the only "fix" would be a Power Commander or similar.

Cheers -d
 

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I noticed the same thing on my 07 and found that removing some of the free play in the throttle cables helped quite a bit.
 

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These are not Harleys. They are light, responsive bikes. I noticed the same thing when I first got mine but now would never have it any other way. It's something you get used to and forget about.
 

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It's almost unmanagable at low speeds, especially standing up going over rough terrain. Granted, I'm new to the bike AND the riding style, but it seems that a less touchy throttle (at least in the first increments of movement) would be a desirable thing. Anybody else looked into this?


The right hand giveth and the left hand taketh away.

When doing low speed manoevers on HD's I'm working the left hand at least as much as the right. It's just a little trickier up on the pegs.

I know someone with an Yamaha FJR who got an elliptical dohickey on the right grip to smooth out throttle play.
 

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it is the other way around....

after test driving a Buell and riding some Harley's over the weekend, I would say it is the other way around. I have to really crank their throttle to go anywhere and get some steam going.

Get used to it, sure you can probably take/give a little slack from the cable, but the Suzuki redlines at 10 grand with torque stating to drop at 9500 rpm's so enjoy cranking the throttle, where the Harley's are totally out of breath at 5500 rpm.

This is not a slam on either product-it is just a character trait of the engine, I have also ridden Ducatis where if you breath on the throttle the bike goes off.
 

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These are not Harleys. They are light, responsive bikes. I noticed the same thing when I first got mine but now would never have it any other way.
Have you ever owned a cheap stereo which went from a whisper to a blast between "1" and "3" on the volume scale? It doesn't mean it's more responsive or powerful; it just means the volume control is poorly designed.

Smooth power application and responsiveness are not mutually exclusive. The abrupt arrival of power from idle is a flaw. Not all responsive, fuel injected bikes behave this way.

It's something you get used to and forget about.
Sure, I can forgive a lot in a bike at this price, but that doesn't make it a feature; it's a bug. :)

Cheers -d
 

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Smooth power application and responsiveness are not mutually exclusive. The abrupt arrival of power from idle is a flaw. Not all responsive, fuel injected bikes behave this way.
Then perhaps the other bikes are the ones that are flawed. The throttle on my V-Strom and my VFR (which behaves pretty much the same way) are exactly the way I like them. I don't consider it to be a flaw at all, I consider it to be a feature.
 

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The throttle on my V-Strom and my VFR (which behaves pretty much the same way) are exactly the way I like them.
Yup, I've heard the same thing about the VFR (I haven't ridden one). If it turns some buyers on (abruptly :) ), then it may well be a conscious design choice. But a feeling of refinement it is not. :)

Don't get me wrong, I'm not complaining. I can work around it, and this bike has a lot going for it, particularly in grins-per-mile. The smooth FI is one thing I miss about BMW, though (there are many more things that I do not miss).

Cheers -d
 

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Yup, I've heard the same thing about the VFR (I haven't ridden one). If it turns some buyers on (abruptly :) ), then it may well be a conscious design choice. But a feeling of refinement it is not. :)
Honda even went so far as to try and tone things down. From idle to "xx" RPM the ECU reduces power on two cylinders. From "xx" RPM to "yy" RPM it adds the third cylinder back in, and from "yy" on you have full power on all 4. I read about it somewhere but don't remember what the exact numbers are or exactly how it goes about it. I just remember that from idle up to some RPM the ECU is reducing power to prevent throttle application from being so abrupt.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not complaining. I can work around it, and this bike has a lot going for it, particularly in grins-per-mile. The smooth FI is one thing I miss about BMW, though (there are many more things that I do not miss).
I promise you, I absolutely guarantee that after a few thousand miles you will never even notice it any more. You'll go back to a BMW and wonder what the hell is wrong with it because it doesn't accelerate right. Then you can still tell me whether it's a flaw or not.
 

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Honda even went so far as to try and tone things down. From idle to "xx" RPM the ECU reduces power on two cylinders. From "xx" RPM to "yy" RPM it adds the third cylinder back in, and from "yy" on you have full power on all 4.
I think we might not be talking about the same thing.

The problem to which I refer (and to which I thought the original poster referred, but I could be wrong) is not the rate of power delivery during acceleration. It is specifically the transition from OFF to ON which is excessively abrupt, and causes a "jerk" at some RPM. That is definitely not desirable.

If that's not what we're talking about, then my apologies for the misunderstanding. I'm partly to blame for using a poor analogy (the volume control).
 

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Tighten up any slack in the throttle cables. This will help a bit (maybe a lot if they were really sloppy). Then just go ride, you will get used to the throttle input. I have also owned two VFR 800's and never had issues with abrupt throttle.

TM
 

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I think we might not be talking about the same thing.

The problem to which I refer (and to which I thought the original poster referred, but I could be wrong) is not the rate of power delivery during acceleration. It is specifically the transition from OFF to ON which is excessively abrupt, and causes a "jerk" at some RPM. That is definitely not desirable.
No, that's what I was referring to as well. My Honda does all that ramping of cylinders in a very low and narrow RPM band. As I said, I'm not sure what the actual numbers are but is something like from idle up to 2,500 RPM, or the first 1,000 RPM or something like that. I don't even notice it happening, but I probably would if it didn't do it. Now when the VTEC kicks in at 7,000 THAT is something that is definitely noticeable!
 

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Stick a Kaoko throttle control on it....
These progressively put a brake on the twistgrip by applying end pressure via a big screw thing - easily adjusted as you ride from nothing to full throttle lock.
Not only do you now have a great cruise control, but if you leave the Kaoko lightly on all the time then it stops that throttle jerk by damping the movement. Really makes a big difference.
For me it makes the difference between scaring the hell out of me around town and being totally confident of throttle control in tight traffic....
 

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Stick a Kaoko throttle control on it....
These progressively put a brake on the twistgrip by applying end pressure via a big screw thing - easily adjusted as you ride from nothing to full throttle lock.
Not only do you now have a great cruise control, but if you leave the Kaoko lightly on all the time then it stops that throttle jerk by damping the movement. Really makes a big difference.
For me it makes the difference between scaring the hell out of me around town and being totally confident of throttle control in tight traffic....
+1. I have the same unit and use it exactly the same way. My HD had a thumbscrew that did the progressive thing, got used to that, was very happy when the Kaoko did the same job.
 

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Stick a Kaoko throttle control on it....
I did, actually, and mentioned it in another thread. It does solve the problem of the loosey-goosey throttle flinging itself all over the place when I hit a bump. It does not, however, address the off-to-on problem, as that problem is not mechanical.

The Kaoko is a very well made device, and I like it a lot. Far superior to any other throttle lock I've used.
 

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You should be able to get it tuned out if you don't like it. Tell whomever you find that is an experienced tuner to decrease your throttle tip in. Throttle tip in performs the same function on an FI motor as the old accelerator pump does on carb motors. Too little tip in and you will likely have a bog so test it out. Here is some tip-tin as related to TPS sensor from a sport bike site talking about Honda FI.

The only thing that the TPS is really doing is letting the ECU know if you are opening, or closing the throttle. This is important because on a modern, high performance engine, as you quickly open the throttle you need more fuel than the apparent lode will dictate. (map and rpm look up) This is know as “Tip In Fuel” or as it was known on a carburetor… “The accelerator Pump.” Without the tip in fuel… the engine would (minimum) cough and flame out. (too much air) At worst… the engine would have HORRIBLE detonation, (pre-ignition) and burn holes in the tops of the pistons, crush the ring lands, bend the rods, or crush the crank bearings. (lot’s-O-bad stuff)
I don't know about all that piston bashing, and devastation, but there you have it!

Good luck setting it the way it makes you happy!
 

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I did, actually, and mentioned it in another thread. It does solve the problem of the loosey-goosey throttle flinging itself all over the place when I hit a bump. It does not, however, address the off-to-on problem, as that problem is not mechanical.

The Kaoko is a very well made device, and I like it a lot. Far superior to any other throttle lock I've used.
Sorry dtalk, it's not the throttle that's loosey-goosey it's your hand not controlling it. If you put on a throttle lock and lock it and go over a bump the motor will not jerk because the throttle is held still. It will take a little time for you to get used to it and most of us don't think it's a flaw. The few I have heard complain have come off of a cruiser, and they are totally different. I have had 54 bikes so I have run the gamut on throttles and I love the quick response. Give yourself some time. :D
 
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