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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all!

The thread title says it all but if you'll bear with me I'll give some background info to better explain my request.

I'm the proud, new(bie) owner of a used gray 2007 DL650. Particulars are: 8K miles, case-bars, rear wheel jack spools, hand guards, headlight modulator, and a FLAT REAR TIRE AFTER OWNING IT ONE WEEK!:bom_furious3:

So, I've been confronted with my first service/maintenance problem and I'm looking to get a jump start on future ones to boot. While my baby sits dejectedly in the garage on her flat a$$ I've ordered an "Open Road Moto-Stand" from www.shermworks.com for $40.00USD instead of giving $150 to my local Dealership. The stand is portable and looks to be perfect for service.

I've read enough bitter threads to know that familiarizing myself with my bike will save a few costly, bitter headaches.

Okay!

I'm going to order a service book for the bike (found here) but does anyone have recommendations for what "special" tools I might need in preparation for say, servicing the valves? Drive Train? Tires? :confused:

I don't know if it's possible, but could I remove my rear tire from the rim (once it's removed too of course) and patch it myself? I know the inherent dangers in patching motorcycle tires, fortunately for me the puncture is centered and small...

Anyways, enough is enough, you guys get the gist.

This board is greatness, and thanks in advance!

:)
 

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You will find that the tool kit does not include a 12mm hex key for removing the front wheel.
Most auto parts stores carry them.

Cheers
 

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You will find that the tool kit does not include a 12mm hex key for removing the front wheel.
+1
Stupid omission on Suzuki's part.

As far as the flat is concerned have you thought about a plug? You can do that without removing the wheel from the bike. You will not be able to remove the tyre for the rim the way that you can with a bicycle or dirt bike. Tubeless tyres are very different to the tubed variety and without the appropriate tools all you will do is bugger the tyre or rim or both.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Duly noted

Fortunately I've been building up a pretty decent set of tools, and I've got the 12MM Hex already!

As to the flat...I found a small piece of steel shaped like a staple right in the middle of my rear tire. I'm pretty sure it can be professionally patched from the inside, but I've heard all sorts of bad responses from folks about any type of motorcycle-tire repairs. I don't know how I feel about it. The service man at my local Suzuki Dealership said they, "do it all the time", but even the salesman (remember my bike is only a week new) said he'd patched one in the past, put 4K miles on it, and then changed it due to feeling "squeemish" about it.

It's a tough call, but I think I'll be buying the new rubber.:sad1:

Which brings up my second dilemma: how to lift the rear wheel?

I found an interesting idea for a simple lift stand here. Does anyone have any better ideas???

I like to think myself "handy" enough to break the bead and remove the tire myself (without marring the snazzy new rims):bom_glasses:. We'll see...

Good thread on this from another board here, although this doesn't mention much about how the wheel came off.

I'll get there.


Thanks for the input!:D
 

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Torque wrenches in pounds and inches
Some good "Tee" handles in hex (Ball heads) and metrics (Motion Pro)
front axle hex, think is 19mm
Grundge brush for rear chain cleaning
Motion Pro has allot of decent tools, do not get their chain riveter as I have heard nothing real good about it.

I would think these you may already have, but they are a big help and make maintence more precise and quick. Your list will grow as you put on miles. Mikes chain tool would help at replacement, but you have plenty of time for that. Enjoy your new machine and be carefull.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks!

I appreciate the advice guys. I'm immobile till my Moto-lift arrives and I can get the dang wheel off.

I'm running stock sneakers on the front and back, Bridgestone Trailwings 110/80 19 on the front and 150/70 17 on the back.

Q: Is $180 + $30 installation for a rear tire sound a little, I dunno...high??

That's prices from the same dealership I just bought the bike from last week, but I'm open to other suggestions.

;)

Again, thank you all for the input!
 

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Yep. its high

I bought new battlewings a couple of months ago and paid ~$200 total for both front and rear and $30 to mount each tire. I took the whole bike in and the mechanic did all the work. It was $20 each if I brought in the wheels off the bike.
I ordered my tires from motorcyclesuperstore. Free shipping on the tires.

BTW. I liked the jackstand idea. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Which brings up my second dilemma: how to lift the rear wheel?
Your Shermworks stand will hold the bike up well enough to remove the rear wheel. Sherm is usually pretty fast with his delivery.
I have fond my Shermworks stand to be quite solid.
It may go without saying, but be sure to use the velcro strap to lock the front brake while using the stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
"Open Road Moto Stand" works as advertised and it showed up promptly which makes Mr. Sherm good people in my book.

Local dealerships A) Don't stock my size rear tire, and B) Want wayyyy too much $$$ for them to bring one in and put it on.

So!

I've ordered a tire from www.motorcyclesuperstore.com (Thanks Cornbread) and I'll be mounting/balancing it my-dang-self. For the money I saved by purchasing the Moto-Stand versus a $130 jack from the stealership I was able to get a Lbs/ft torque wrench from Sears, so I got that going for me....which is nice.

It's just soooo hard to see my baby rearless during 4th of July weekend.:sad1:

Thanks again for all the input everybody!
 

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I guess I'm lucky, I bought my stepdad's tools/chest when he retired so I've got just about everything I'll ever need.

As far as service, if you can't find someone for the big stuff in Waco try Danny's Motorcycle Shop in Bryan. He races Suzukis, both GSX-Rs and SVs so he knows your bike. He's the cheapest I've found around here too.

Danny's M/C Shop
3607 Colson Rd
Bryan, TX 77808
(979) 778-4380

Danny's Shop
 
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