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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I am an admitted tool fiend/hoarder and have no intention of changing. I love me some tools!!!!! I find it very frustrating to be in the middle of a project only to run into a brick wall because I don't have the correct tool to proceed with no way to make the tool I need to keep going. ARRRGGGGHHH! Anyway, what specific tool do you use the most often that provides the best result quickly. Mine is a laser chain/wheel alignment tool I find rather fun to use, plus, it insures the most accurate alignment of the rear wheel and chain. Next is a Makita 12V lithium impact wrench that is rather low on torque so it is useful for small fasteners without fear of stripping as long as you are gentle. I use this tool to remove fasteners and only to snug them down, then torque them manually. Experience.
 

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I have one of those laser alignment tools that I picked up while have a paranoid fit abut the chain. I do so love me a nice laser! :thumbup:
 

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Yeah, I sometimes get bogged down in details that I get frustrated, but, on the otherhand, at times being so detailed oriented gives me great results. I'm trying to find that balance of doing quality work and yet moving forward. Bet you know what I mean. Still, I LOOOOOVE me these tools.
 

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Yeah, I sometimes get bogged down in details that I get frustrated, but, on the otherhand, at times being so detailed oriented gives me great results. I'm trying to find that balance of doing quality work and yet moving forward. Bet you know what I mean. Still, I LOOOOOVE me these tools.
I know exactly what you mean. I'm the kind of home mechanic that will spend two hours balancing carbies, not because I can't get them within spec in under 30 minutes, but because by going the extra hour and a half I can get them within a quarter of the listed spec. My best is under 10% (30mmHg spec, job done within 2mmHg) and that little four pot engine was smooooooooth! :beatnik: Took flippin' AGES though ... but when it's your baby it really doesn't matter. :mrgreen:
 

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My best is under 10% (30mmHg spec, job done within 2mmHg) and that little four pot engine was smooooooooth!
I use a homemade manometer made of vinyl tubing filled with ATF. I'm thinking that because ATF is 1/10 the density of mercury you can adjust ten times as accurately. That's my theory, anyway, and I'm sticking to it.

Also, I'm a cheap SOB and those mercury sticks are pricey.:mrgreen:
 

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I have a laser lever I got when doing some tile work. I spose I could sight down the chain with that.
Youse guys gave me an inspiration. Thanks.
My mercury carb sticks have gotta be 30-40 years old. Do ATF last that long?
 

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I love my Hexpro Metric Allens.
Hex Pro®
What laser are you guys using for chain alignment?
Im using the Motion Pro alignment tool, but a LASER :thumbup:
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I love my Hexpro Metric Allens.
Hex Pro®
What laser are you guys using for chain alignment?
Im using the Motion Pro alignment tool, but a LASER :thumbup:
Mike
I have the Profi D-Cat but wish I had bought the L-cat model. The D model works just great but the L is a small step better IMHO. Ordered it thru Luster Care.
 

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I asked for and got one of those Kobalt double ratcheting screw drivers for X-Mas. Has lots of different drives in the handle. Makes fast work of removing fairings and everything else. Fits easily under the seat. Bang for the buck it's great. I would recommend it for everyone.
 

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I've gotten into real trouble a few times using those non-reversing ratchet end wrenches.

A tool I've been looking at is sold through Sears for $30 that cleans up external threads. Metric or SAE / right or left hand....it slices it dices it cuts it purées.
 

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My mercury carb sticks have gotta be 30-40 years old. Do ATF last that long?
Don't know, but you can replace it by diverting about a dime's worth when you do your car's a/t service. Heck, you can even use USED ATF.:mrgreen:

Another advantage to ATF is that if for some reason it gets sucked into the carb or TB it won't cause any damage. It's just oil.
 

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JIS screwdrivers. Wonderful things. :)

Taps and dies can be awfully handy to have around too. If money's tight just buy a handle and the the 6m x 1.0 and 8m x 1.25 sizes, those are what I'm reaching for 90% of the time.
 

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My go to tool...



and if that's not the right tool for the job, I go to....



Seriously, I rejoice at for the first time having a reasonably well-equipped, uncluttered garage. I smile each time I can reach over to my tool box and pull out that punch, drill bit, probe, pick, plier, etc. that would otherwise stop everything in its tracks.
 

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The satisfaction of having the right tool when you need it. I've been rebuilding and freshening a Rolair portable construction air compressor. It has a plastic cover attached by four hex-head machine screws, with 9/32" heads. A nutdriver socket wouldn't work -- I needed a 9/32" end wrench, and found one in my tool box. Didn't even know I had one! Who has a 9/32" end wrench? Or needs one? Still, very satisfying to have one.
 

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Is it wrong for me to drool over another mans flashlight? :var_14: The number one tool I use, and have an incredible infatuation for, is a good quality small flashlight. Streamlight makes awesome and affordable lights.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The satisfaction of having the right tool when you need it. I've been rebuilding and freshening a Rolair portable construction air compressor. It has a plastic cover attached by four hex-head machine screws, with 9/32" heads. A nutdriver socket wouldn't work -- I needed a 9/32" end wrench, and found one in my tool box. Didn't even know I had one! Who has a 9/32" end wrench? Or needs one? Still, very satisfying to have one.

Exactly! This was the intent of my thread.....how frustrating it is to try and tackle a rather intricate repair/overhaul/replacement job only to hit that concrete wall of not having a tool to proceed. I've been frustrated many times by needing a particular toll to finish the job only to come to a screeching halt while I take the time to track it down. Also, I've been made fun of for my tool obsession from friends and family only to be asked to help them make a repair because they know I have a vast selection of many many tools. The ones who ridiculed me get no help. Let'em eat crow.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I asked for and got one of those Kobalt double ratcheting screw drivers for X-Mas. Has lots of different drives in the handle. Makes fast work of removing fairings and everything else. Fits easily under the seat. Bang for the buck it's great. I would recommend it for everyone.

Hey, I got one of those also last Xmas! An awesome tool! I used it to get to the throttle body clamps using the 1/4" hex adapter. Excellent design that you can twist the handle back and forth while still going in the same direction(no reversing needed). For those who don't know what is meant by same-direction-non-reversing design, it means that you insert the bit into the screw/bolt head and turn the handle counterclockwise to loosen, then, when you turn the handle clockwise, the shaft continues to turn counterclockwise. Flip a small lever at the handle base and you get the same action to tightening. An excellent design. Nice touch is that all the 1/4" hex drives I have in my arsenal fit this tool. I'd rate this tool A+++.
 
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