StromTrooper banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The Army now requires Soldiers to take what it calls the Experienced Rider Course (ERC) one year following completion of the Basic Rider Course and then every three years as a refresher. I wasn't too excited about it, but it's free and I prefer to follow regs. Anyway, it was a fairly easy course and worth it for one reason alone. It's a huge confidence builder to practice those same skills you learn on the little 125s and 250s on your own bike. The instructor even said he recommends people retake the course every time they switch bikes and I'd agree. I know most folks don't get to do something like this during their "work" day or do it for free, but if you get the chance, I'd recommend it as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,437 Posts
Hey, Dave

Does the Army require the rider to have insurance? There was a recent bad wreck here caused by a rider from Joint Base Lewis McCord, some of my group knew the local guy who got hit by the guy from JBLM, but we didn't know if the JBLM rider had insurance. And he might have been Air Force. Or maybe he didn't take the bike on base, so the Army knew nothing about the bike.

A riding coach I was chatting with told me that when doing an Army class he calculated the impact of various rounds compared to a motorcycle crash. An M16 round has the energy of a rider hitting a phone pole at 15 mph. A 20 mm non-explosive training round has the same impact as that rider hitting the pole at 78 mph. The soldiers understand this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hey, Dave

Does the Army require the rider to have insurance? There was a recent bad wreck here caused by a rider from Joint Base Lewis McCord, some of my group knew the local guy who got hit by the guy from JBLM, but we didn't know if the JBLM rider had insurance. And he might have been Air Force. Or maybe he didn't take the bike on base, so the Army knew nothing about the bike.
Yes the Army, and I imagine the Air Force, requires insurance. None of the regs distinguish from on post or off post. In fact, it's a common false assumption that Soldier only need the MSF course if they want to ride on post. Actually, it's required if you want to ride at all. If this guy's chain of command finds out he was operating any kind of vehicle without insurance, it will be very bad news for him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,457 Posts
Any extra training you get to operate the bike helps. I really enjoyed the advanced MSF training. Mo is bettah!
If you want to go gonzo, take a track day. it's a really hoot. You will learn a lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,437 Posts
If this guy's chain of command finds out he was operating any kind of vehicle without insurance, it will be very bad news for him.
He was in pieces after hitting the Harley head on at 100. The Harley rider was in the trauma center for a couple of weeks, but is now back home and already shopping for another H-D.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
He was in pieces after hitting the Harley head on at 100. The Harley rider was in the trauma center for a couple of weeks, but is now back home and already shopping for another H-D.
That sucks! The Army will do an LOD (line of duty) investigation. I've never seen them make a negative finding unless someone was involved in some kind of horrible crime when they died. Technically, however, they could find that it was not an LOD death due to the excessive speed alone. That would mean no benefits for his family, which is usually why commanders never decide that way even when they could.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,350 Posts
The ERC involves a lot of low-speed running, idling, and stopping and restarting. When I took the ERC, it was me on my vintage GS ('83 GS850G), a guy on a ratty Savage, eight Harleys, and a new Buell.

Every single one of the Hardleys quit running that day, and five went home on trailers or trucks. The Buell started to puke oil out of somewhere on the front cylinder midmorning. The rider finally just took off on one wheel (brilliant move, eh?) to go straight back to the dealer, where I suspect some less-than-polite opinions were exchanged.

The two of us with the sense to ride well-engineered bikes didn't have any issues, other than extreme boredom. :furious:

We still got our completion certificates, even though with all the dead bikes and oil puking we only got through maybe half the course. The instructors would just stop teaching when another Harley seized up and let everyone tinker as long as they wanted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
The wife and I just completed the BRC2 course this weekend. About all I can say is I was unimpressed. I hoped that a course designed for "experienced" riders would have been more challenging but it was a bit under-whelming. According to the instructers the ARC is a bit more difficult and teaches more racing based skill sets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,019 Posts
The ERC involves a lot of low-speed running, idling, and stopping and restarting. When I took the ERC, it was me on my vintage GS ('83 GS850G), a guy on a ratty Savage, eight Harleys, and a new Buell.

Every single one of the Hardleys quit running that day, and five went home on trailers or trucks. The Buell started to puke oil out of somewhere on the front cylinder midmorning. The rider finally just took off on one wheel (brilliant move, eh?) to go straight back to the dealer, where I suspect some less-than-polite opinions were exchanged.

The two of us with the sense to ride well-engineered bikes didn't have any issues, other than extreme boredom. :furious:

We still got our completion certificates, even though with all the dead bikes and oil puking we only got through maybe half the course. The instructors would just stop teaching when another Harley seized up and let everyone tinker as long as they wanted.
With all respect somethings greatly amiss here. It's entirely possible that if very hot and the owners did not disable it, the HD's went into "parade mode" (ECM shuts down one cylinder when sensing overheating) I've help teach RLAP classes with as many as 13 HD's in a class and not a one has had a catastrophic failure due to continual friction zone maneuvers. I've run my 1800HD bagger through police cone courses for most of a day without failure. Many of my Motor officer friends cut their teeth on HD's for ten 8 hour days for certification without failure. Don't get me wrong, they have their downsides for cone maneuvers, but complete failure is rarely one of them.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top