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Discussion Starter #1
I posted last week about a slight slide out as I was slowing down to make a turn, I attributed it to low air in the rear tire. The tire was completely flat the next day, from what I suspect was a stuck valve stem core? since been fine. the tires are fairly new. I think it ws a coincidence

I've had the same feeling since 2-3 times, with the tires at correct psi? Getting scared thinking somethings wrong with the bike. It's only ntoced when I'm slowing to turn

I'm thinking I may be using to much rear brake, I always use both, but will too much rear brake cause that? Or something similar? I've never experienced this until recently.
 

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Too much (i.e. locking up) rear brake could do it. So can down shifting if you cause a compression skid. Have you recently changed bikes? It took me a while to get used to the more positive brakes on the V strom after coming off the KLR.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I went from a Honda Shadow(2 years) to the Wee, back in maybe September? I only recently have had these issues though

I downshift too. so that alone is enough to feel that skid feeling, or a sharp downshift with a little to much rear brake?
 

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I can't imagine unintentionally locking the rear ever being a good thing, but I do it purposely quite often. I'm guessing a low tire would be slightly less prone to lock up, not sure though if it's almost flat.
 

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I posted last week about a slight slide out as I was slowing down to make a turn, I attributed it to low air in the rear tire. The tire was completely flat the next day, from what I suspect was a stuck valve stem core? since been fine. the tires are fairly new. I think it ws a coincidence

I've had the same feeling since 2-3 times, with the tires at correct psi? Getting scared thinking somethings wrong with the bike. It's only ntoced when I'm slowing to turn

I'm thinking I may be using to much rear brake, I always use both, but will too much rear brake cause that? Or something similar? I've never experienced this until recently.
Personally I find it hard to lock my rear wheel with the rear brake. I often practice emergency stops with both brakes and also just stopping hard with the rear brake to find out where the skid point is. The only time I was able to do it was coming down my gravel driveway and it was just a small skid. I don't know if it's my brakes or what. I do find it VERY easy to over brake with my front brake and that's a little scary.
 

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I locked the rear wheel a few times during the first week I had my Wee. My previous bike was a Buell Ulysses with a rear brake that didn't really do anything, so I was used to leaning on the rear brake a lot harder than I need to now.
 

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I also locked up both front and rear a few times when I first got my Wee. The OEM tyres aren't that sticky, especially if you come off a more road focussed bike.
 

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Personally I find it hard to lock my rear wheel with the rear brake. I often practice emergency stops with both brakes and also just stopping hard with the rear brake to find out where the skid point is. The only time I was able to do it was coming down my gravel driveway and it was just a small skid. I don't know if it's my brakes or what. I do find it VERY easy to over brake with my front brake and that's a little scary.
I would get your rear brake checked. My bike locks up the rear very quickly with moderate pressure on all surfaces.
 

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Last week I locked up the rear brake and the result was a skid. I was riding on a backroad I ride quite often and was coming up on an intersection where my next turn was. I must have been "zoning" out because I was enjoying the ride. When I snapped back to reality,I realized I was running out of braking distance. I quickly and firmly began applying both brakes and downshifted at the same time to use compression braking to help the slowing process. I then felt the rear skid slightly and released the pressure on the rear brake and was able to save it and make the turn safely. Two things I realized: 1- when the rear began to skid I did not feel the rear tire lock up. My conclusion was that the rear brakes feel "numb" and did not provide any feedback. 2- Upon downshifting for compression braking it helped contribute to the loss of traction combined with the firm braking. Other than that, I have never locked up the rear brakes before that. So, IMO it was the result of rear brakes with very little feel and feedback and compression braking. BTW, I went back to see how long the skidmark was; about 10 ft.
 

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It's probably the fact that the rear brake lever is set too high.

If you have a centrestand, easy to check with 1 helper.
Bike on the stand, engine off, in neutral.

Have the helper spin the rear wheel, put your foot on the brake.

Tilt your foot to release the lever WITHOUT lifting your foot off the peg, if your helper can't spin the rear freely now, the lever needs to be lower.

Once you start a slide you can't lift your foot off the pegs, so the only way to release the rear brake is to tilt your foot. If that doesn't fully release the brake it'll keep sliding.

Pete
 

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This may sound a bit too obvious and you probably have checked this...but is your rear tire free of oil/chain lube contamination?
 

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It's probably the fact that the rear brake lever is set too high.

If you have a centrestand, easy to check with 1 helper.
Bike on the stand, engine off, in neutral.

Have the helper spin the rear wheel, put your foot on the brake.

Tilt your foot to release the lever WITHOUT lifting your foot off the peg, if your helper can't spin the rear freely now, the lever needs to be lower.

Once you start a slide you can't lift your foot off the pegs, so the only way to release the rear brake is to tilt your foot. If that doesn't fully release the brake it'll keep sliding.

Pete
Due to a go kart accident (don't laugh) my right ankle doesn't bend quite a well as it should. Consequently, I found I was dragging the rear brake on my new 2007 DL650A.

I didn't realize how bad this was until I wore out a set of rear pads.

So I adjusted the brake lever level downward and things are much better now.

I have ABS so I have never locked up the back tire of my 'Strom on pavement except when downshifting upon entering a sharp corner. "What, no slipper clutch!?!?". I have locked up a Honda Rebel (rabbit) and a Harley Softail (WTF?!?!?!) which inspired my 'Strom selection.

The OP came off a cruiser* to the 'Strom, so it's completely feasible to me that he's over-braking the rear.

The flat tire is a separate issue which is merely coincidental.

Practicing emergency stopping - in a safe place - is never a bad idea. What's really fun is having a hidden assistant toss ping pong balls into your path for these practice sessions.

Good luck.





*This may be stereotyping, but cruiser riders tend to use more rear brake.
 

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My problem with the rear brakes is their "dead" feel. I practice hard braking a lot and for the life of me the rear brake is close to useless because I can't modulate it correctly, heavy boots don't help.

I would never ever think to improve the stopping power of them like I did by installing 4 pot front calipers, for me weak is good.

Sometime I wish the rear brake lever was on the clutch side like my road bicycle sooo much easier to control the stopping power of the rear.


Ron W.
 

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yes and no

A clumsy downshift will nearly slide the back wheel on its own, with braking added, yeah, you're probably stretching the traction limit on the rear wheel. If you're using the front brake to maximum advantage, only light pressure on the rear brake is needed as there's not much weight on it. Yeah, my rear brake is pretty numb, too. except when riding on dirt or gravel, it doesn't get much heavy use, though.
 
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My fear about over-breaking the back is that it's a moving target: under hard breaking with both, the front braking transfers weight forward and the back gets easier to lock. It's not just that what "normally" wouldn't lock the back suddenly does in an aggressive braking situation, it's also that it's a "progressive" change under hard braking. I'm no expert, but I think that as the bike is diving forward under hard front braking, you almost have to release some of the back to prevent a skid (and maybe high-side).

Sorry for babbling - is there any chance you were on the fronts pretty hard every time the back seemed "easy" to lock?
 

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This is where riding a dirt bike is very helpful. The limited traction teaches you brake controland how to handle slideouts in a hurry. Plus the lower speeds on the dirt make your injuries from falling, and you will fall, less severe than they would be on the street. Despite what some people say, even on dirt the front brake provides most of your stopping power as the rear will lock much quicker on dirt than it does on the street. It has always been my opinion that everyone should start out on a dirt bike before they ride the street. Riders get hurt on the dirt but they get killed on the street!
 

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it has always been my opinion that everyone should start out on a dirt bike before they ride the street. Riders get hurt on the dirt but they get killed on the street!
+1. .
 

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Lee Parks' book, Total Control, has a great diagram of taper braking of the rear brake. The force on the rear relates to the traction the rear offers depending on the weight on the rear.

When starting braking, using both front & rear brakes, progressively increase the rear brake force. As the bike slows and its weight shifts to the front (reducing traction on the rear), progressively reduce the rear brake force. When very slow, rapidly increase the front brake force and reduce the front brake force. Of course, front braking when very slow with the front turned can result in a slow highside--typical beginner crash.
 
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