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Hi All,

Have been riding a v-Strom dl650 for a couple of years. I'm in sydney and planning a trip up north into Queensland and left into Northern Territory. A lot will be on gravel roads, probably sandy in parts.

I have raised my handlebars and have angled the levers down a bit, but still find it pretty uncomfortable riding and changing gears standing.

So how important is it to be able to stand through the slippery bits and sandy corners?

Do you folks sit or stand the rough on a vStrom?

I'm hoping not to have to lower the foot pegs.

Thanks for your help - Matthew.
 

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standing is a lot better for my back, less jolting, i don't do it for hours at a time, just the bad parts, and i don't do much shifting at these times, mostly gas and brakes, and hang on,, when two up, i don't stand, just the added weight smooths out the jolts and i get the added traction,,
 
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Standing and separating your weight from the bikes weight when necessary can be helpful when things get rough but it also takes a lot of energy, your fitness will play a big part.

Raising the height of your bars is the first thing, you can lower the pegs too.

Slippery bits are not so important, just try to become one with the bike but on rutted and sandy roads being able to move your weight around will help.

When sitting if you hit a bump you and the bike will bounce, if you can stand up comfortably only the bike will bounce your legs will absorb the shock.
 

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The ability to comfortably stand on the pegs is just as import for me on or off road. I like to be able to move around and stretch my legs when riding.

So you answer your question, YES!
Same here. Standing is a MUST no matter what the road conditions are like. I'll stand for 10 minute bouts on back country roads after sitting for a while. Great way to stretch the legs, get some fresh air and a new perspective. Also my go to when I feel a bit tired 😁

When I traded my 650 for the 1000, first thing I did was migrate my sw-motech foot pegs.

The benefit of being short... there wasn't much other than a pair of barbacks for my DL650 to get a perfect stand up riding ergo.
 

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When you stand on the pegs you want to be in a relaxed balanced position. Legs mostly straight slight forward lean. It shouldn't be a strain to maintain the position.

Not like this hunched over:



But like this upright and relaxed:

 

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'14 DL1000A ~_/) ~ '14 GSX1300R
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+1 to all of the above. I would go as far as to say learning to ride standing (comfortably) is mandatory in virtually all off-pavement environs. And don't be afraid to lean forward while up there.
My current fitness level limits me to about 5 mins in this position at which point my legs feel more like a pair of sewing machines
 

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I have not yet been pulled over for it but I have been told in my state it is against the law to stand up while on the move unless it is to avoid something on the road.

I believe it is to stop standup wheel stands ?

The law suggests if you wish to stretch your legs stop and get off ?

When I get sick of sitting I stand up and my bride gives my butt a massage, it helps extend my ride times.
 
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Personally, I don't spend that much time standing, but I'm more on pavement now. If I'm on gravel I'll sit too. I rode dirt bikes before so if the bike is a little squirrelly under me I'm used to it (it doesn't freak me out). I'll stand for a short time if I'm hitting potholes or big bumps. Speed is a factor too. I don't hit the gravel fast like I did on my dirt bike & I'm going slower than if I was on pavement. Tire choice comes into it too. If you're running a strictly street tire you'll have to be more careful. Personally, I like to run a little bit more aggressive just incase I find a forest service road I want to go down. I don't go on the backwoods dirt bike trails on my V-strom. If you're on some Outback rut road you may need to stand in some areas. I've been on plenty of those albeit in a ute. I lived outside Brisbane for a while in Albany Creek (back in America now).
 

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You don't have to stand up all the time but it gives you much better control over the bike. Better for your back too - you don't want to be seating when going 60 miles/h or faster on rough full of potholes road. And no straight legs is not a proper technique when riding in standing position. I definitely recommend to change stock brake and clutch levers to set of shorty's. Bar raisers and off road foot pegs. They work better (for me) with lowering kit.
 

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I don't like to shift while standing, but the strom's motor is so tractable I rarely need to, just need to pick the right gear and let it do its thing. If in doubt I go a gear higher, because:
1. The motor doesn't mind lugging, and even below 3000 rpm there's some grunt available.
2. Downshifting while standing is easy, kicking the lever down is easier than threading your toe underneath it.
3. Being lower in the revs makes the motor less responsive, which is a good thing if bumpy terrain causes you to accidentally give the throttle a twist.
 

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100% for standing. The difference in stability and control is huge. There are a million opinions on how to stand, basically find a position that is comfy for you and practice. Watch a bunch of youtube videos on how to stand on an adventure bike, there are hundreds of them.

Two things everyone agrees on:
1. Don't deathgrip the handlebars, you should have a relaxed grip so you can use the controls
2. Grip the bike with you knees
 

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No need to suddenly stand up just because you hit a regular old dirt road. A friend of mine lives on a well maintained dirt road here in Vermont and he is making fun of the GS groups going by his house all standing while going half the speed of the big Harleys who are all sitting down, lol. It's ok to stand if it helps you relax on gravel, but not the entire time to the point of getting tired or making it a chore.

I stand mainly when I see a technical section coming up, or to stretch my legs and just change position for a bit to stay limber and loose.
If you stand, move around, stay loose, don't just stand stock straight like the guy in picture above (he looks like he is just going slow and planning his next move)
  • If you go down a steep hill or through a water crossing/deep sand/gravel section, bring your weight all the way back to the point of almost sitting on the back seat
  • A steep uphill, bring your weight forward over the tank and handlebar
  • A tight slow technical turn on dirt, move your weight to the outside of the turn
 

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Hi Matthew, and Welcome! (not sure what you've been doing the last two years),

My limited understanding (no pun intended) of standing is that is lowers the effective centre of gravity of you and your bike overall; when standing, your body weight is now on the foot pegs, rather than being on or about the seat height. That said, except for stretching and catching some air and a better view, it is really a soft-surface technique. I am a slow and careful rider off road, and one bit of advice I was given has been a good general rule; 'stand when you need to, sit when you can'. It does help in dealing with the soggy and unstable bits. @Hogges three points above are a perfect short course in standing body positions. @vanislejay too, as well as other offerings.

I have a bit of up 'n back on my bars and it has been a massive improvement both when on my butt and on my feet.
 

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I ride a trials bike. Standing on the pegs is a way of life. So far the only bike I can stand on comfortably is my trials bike. I raised the bars on my '14 dl1000 so could stand on it easier but it changed its cornering characteristics on the street to the worse. And the street is where I like to ride it so I moved them back. The GS stand on the pegs thing seems a little ridiculous to me.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

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Go out and watch an observed trials competition and see what can be accomplished by standing up. don't try to do every thing they do with your 'strom.
 

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Raise the bars, lower the pegs. Adjust until you can comfortably stand for periods of time. Up on the Dempster, you have to be able to stand up as the road changes from hard rock, to deep gravel, to smooth dirt, to deep mud in the blink of an eye, and if you are sitting down during the transition it can get pretty darn scary. When you stand, it becomes more like surfing, you can almost steer with your feet by applying weight to the footpegs, and if the bike suddenly goes up/down, or left/right, you can easily compensate, your legs do it naturally. I can imagine Australian roads are similar.
Add a steering stabilizer too, and then you are covered for everything short of a major hole.
 

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Big ADV bikes aren't dirt bikes. You don't ride then in the attack position, butt back leaning over the bars with elbows up. You have very little body influence on a bike that's over 500 lbs.

Riding in an upright position lets you relax and ride extended distances. Yea your legs are mostly straight and your body is slightly leaning forward most of the time.

 
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