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I was watching a video on YT from one of the Strommers. He shows riding around his town and everytime he stops at a traffic light he put the bike in 1st and waits with clutch pulled in for the light to change. I also read the comments people put on the video and I came across one that said not to do it as it wears springs in the clutch. Now, I always keep the bike in gear at traffic lights for safety reasons. Does this really have ill effects on the clutch? :confused:
 

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I don't worry about that.

I will do the same if there are less than 4 vehicles behind me. The clutch springs on my 2006 are original (actually all of the clutch is original.)

..Tom
 

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I doubt it has any ill effects on the clutch. But even if it did, I would rather be able to get moving quickly if need be. If I know its going to be a long light I might put it in nuetral after a few cars get stopped behind me.
 

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Yes it wears on the clutch, but it is what the bike and clutch is designed to do.

It gives you a tool to be able to get out of the way if you need to.
 

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If you ever hear squealing tires behind you at a traffic light, you will wish you were in gear. Been there, done that, had to quickly move to the left when a Harley locked up the rear at a red light, I guess he was day dreaming and not paying attention. I got out of the way by sliding up beside a car, he ended up squeezing to the right and missed the car's side by inches as he went off pavement making a hard and wild right turn into a parking lot.

Always watch your mirrors when stopped, especially if there is nothing behind you. I rather not become another dead motorcyclist because I was in neutral and someone fails to stop making me a hood ornament. Always leave yourself some space, a way out if possible. I've seen a commercial truck push cars through an intersection, so I will sometimes put my bike back in gear if a truck etc is coming up to fast even with multiple cars behind. The only time I go to neutral is in stopped construction zones, once the cars pile up way back I'll stop the engine too and stand next to the bike. I hate sitting on a hot bike in stopped traffic when you know its going to be a long wait.
 

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No matter what the topic, I hope you're aware that Youtube comments are a pretty piss-poor source for information, advice, or affirmation of any kind...

In this case, the commenters are dead wrong as usual. Holding the clutch in doesn't place any extra wear on anything and won't make your clutch springs wear out early.

And as noted, there's a significant chance that developing the habit of keeping the bike in gear could literally save your life.

Once, while stopped in heavy traffic on the interstate thanks to a wreck up ahead, I felt the beginnings of a strong shove from the rear. I instantly dropped the clutch and skedaddled around the truck in front of me. Turns out the guy in the truck behind me dropped his phone and took his foot off the brake while reaching for it. The guy was mortified -- he was also a rider and thought he'd never be one of "those blind cagers"...

Upon further inspection, my Vee was entirely unscathed -- I happened to have the Givi bags on that day, and we're pretty sure they took the brunt of the shove, and my reactions kept it from being much worse.
 

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I never use the brakes because that wears out the pads.

My estate will enjoy them upon my premature demise.

105K miles on my clutch.
 

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Give the following driver something to notice--in case they're looking. Extra bright stop lights are good, as are the bright ones that blink before they go steady. Stop to whichever side of the car ahead offers the best escape route. don't stop directly in the center behind a car. There might be an oily spot, but also, the following driver's brain will better notice something to the side than something centered.

In 1st gear,
headed toward an escape route,
on the brakes to keep the brake lights on,
watch the mirrors,
ready for a quick getaway.

So what if the clutch parts wear. Those cost less than having a colorectal surgeon remove a minivan from your....:jawdrop:
 

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I was taught the same -first thing you do when you come to a stop in traffic is plot your escape plan. In gear, one eye on the best rearward facing mirror, the other on the traffic. Be ready to go at all times.


Though one or two time I have wished for a rearward facing FFAR.
 

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Decent quality springs do not wear out or relax. Otherwise your valve springs (and many other types) would all be at risk.

Typical spring failure mode involves fatigue but a good design keeps stresses well below the endurance limit, giving infinite fatigue life in absence of metallurgical defects or surface dings. Garage door springs apparently aren't designed to those criteria though. Many eventually go BANG after as few as 10,000, cycles!

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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I keep the bike in gear until I am sure nothing could ever get to me, so almost always..... 165,000 kms on the stock clutch...chudder be dammed :)
 

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Unless my fingers are really tired and I want to take advantage of the red light to rest my hands a bit, I usually keep it in 1st, ready to take off. But that's on the SV, the Strom rarely ever sees a red light.
 
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