StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So. I've almost got the money saved. (My treasurer/wife is big on "no debt for nuttin' that isn't a house.") Been watching here, Craigslist, and ADVRider to see what's available used and what's a good deal vs. not a good deal. Definitely want a 650, ideally already with luggage (my Excel spreadsheet says a used bike with hard top and side bags is on average $456 more than a bike without bags, which is WAY cheaper than buying new).

My big question now is, ABS? Or Not ABS?

The average Not ABS used bike with bags I'm looking at is, say, a 2007 with 35k miles for about $2500-3000.

The average ABS used bike with bags I'm looking at is, say, a 2011 with 15k miles for about $4500-5000.

(And yes, I know a lot of that difference is just "newer vs. older". I estimate about $1300 of the difference is just that.)

Now, I started riding late; learned at age 45 9 years ago, and my last bike died 3+ years ago, so I've not been riding over that time. I'm not the best rider out there, and I know it. I'm also an out-of-shape lardass, for whatever difference that makes. (6'1", should be 200 lb, actually 260 lb.)

So is ABS likely to be a lifesaver for me? A big enough difference to get a newer bike even at a higher price? Or should I save my simoleons and just get a good less-expensive non-ABS bike?

(I'm in California and would ride year-round, some commuting and some weekend touring, if that helps.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Wait around and find a good deal on exactly what you want. I managed to snatch an 08 ABS with (translating from units that make sense for the benefit of americans) roughly 30k miles for $2800, and it has pelican case panniers, a top box, a skid plate, crash bars and heated grips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,473 Posts
Abs is nice but not a deal breaker. Others will argue that since you can buy ABS bikes, why not. Having had ABS bikes you get so used to not skidding you don't give it a thought.
I got my 04 Wee, without ABS, and laid a long rear tire mark while the bike squirmed around under me when I stomped on the brakes at speed.
I was amused and then could recall older bike before the ABS god came to be. It's better with. But I'm not upgrading just to get it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
I wouldn't buy a bike without it. Lookup youtube wet motorcycle braking with/without abs.

Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Wait around and find a good deal on exactly what you want. I managed to snatch an 08 ABS with (translating from units that make sense for the benefit of americans) roughly 30k miles for $2800, and it has pelican case panniers, a top box, a skid plate, crash bars and heated grips.
Canadian here, so you didn't have to translate for me. :) I just happen to be working and living in Los Angeles now. Learned to ride when I first came to the US for work in 2008. And yes, an 08 ABS at that price would be PERFECT! Congrats on the lucky buy!

(I'm actually including BC and AB in my search for bikes on Craigslist ... but I need to find out how expensive/time-consuming/difficult it would be to import a bike to the US.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,146 Posts
Canadian here, so you didn't have to translate for me. :) I just happen to be working and living in Los Angeles now. Learned to ride when I first came to the US for work in 2008. And yes, an 08 ABS at that price would be PERFECT! Congrats on the lucky buy!

(I'm actually including BC and AB in my search for bikes on Craigslist ... but I need to find out how expensive/time-consuming/difficult it would be to import a bike to the US.)
Speaking to your last comment, first. You do not want to try and bring a Canadian bike into California. Or any bike or car from out of state. It can be done but it would take a really strong bargain and you have to have the right attitude to make any sense. Besides there are a ton of just-right-bikes here.

AS for getting a newer ABS bike - my opinion is an evangelistic yes. The V-Stroms are reliable and long lived. Still, newer is newer. The ABS when put to its intended use is a major upgrade. By intended use I mean that ABS is not just about stopping without a skid. It is about being able continue to steer around a corner or around an obstacle with the brakes jammed on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Can you put a price on SAFETY?

Kidding, but seriously if the price is slightly higher for something that can potentially save you from personal injury or worse, bike injury, it's almost as good as insurance imo. The argument of "you learn to ride worse with ABS" is almost meaningless to me because if you own a bike with ABS, that's what you ride. And in the future, every bike will have ABS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
I've never owned a bike with ABS, but have had enough unexpected front end lockups that my next touring bike will have to have it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,860 Posts
In addition to ABS vs older I think you need to consider if the bike has upgraded suspension, given your weight. If I were to find a non ABS bike with upgraded front and rear suspension I would probably go for that. Given that you ride basically on dry roads all the time ABS would very rarely come into play. Poor suspension would constantly make the ride less safe or less enjoyable.
 

·
aka Rick in Alabama
Joined
·
501 Posts
ABS is not about your inseam length, undressed field weight, or tenure in the saddle. ABS is about the handling characteristics of the bike in a panic stop or some other crisis braking scenario.

For example, when someone does a U turn in from of you resulting in you slamming on the brakes while leaned over in a turn in the mountains on a rainy day.

ABS saved my bacon on the above referenced adventure, and on one other that was a white-knuckle on the hand brake, practically standing on the foot pedal straight line braking maneuver.

It's worth the extra cost, IMHO.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Speaking to your last comment, first. You do not want to try and bring a Canadian bike into California. Or any bike or car from out of state. It can be done but it would take a really strong bargain and you have to have the right attitude to make any sense. Besides there are a ton of just-right-bikes here.
Would it be that bad for a used bike from elsewhere in the US? Or, for that matter, a new one? (I'm also looking at any deals on "new old stock" bikes out there, after having read this lucky duck's experience.) ISTR reading a couple of things along the lines of:

  1. If a used bike has more than 7,500 miles, you can bring it into CA without it having to meet CA emission standards; and
  2. Many bikes nowadays are done with CA specs for the whole US.
Or are these incorrect?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,146 Posts
Would it be that bad for a used bike from elsewhere in the US? Or, for that matter, a new one? (I'm also looking at any deals on "new old stock" bikes out there, after having read this lucky duck's experience.) ISTR reading a couple of things along the lines of:

  1. If a used bike has more than 7,500 miles, you can bring it into CA without it having to meet CA emission standards; and
  2. Many bikes nowadays are done with CA specs for the whole US.
Or are these incorrect?
AS long as you never forget that this is your time and money we're talking about here_ hold on tightly to it until someone can guarantee you the results you want.

There is a difference between an older, exempted vehicle and new/old stock. If there is a particular NOS deal you want on a out of state bike it should be done via a dealer swap. That is to say your dealer will arrange to get it for you. At that point you may find that they can't do it. Not because they are money-evil-cheaters but because the Cali bikes have different gas tanks and CPUs and carbon canisters which are reflected in the VIN #. The CA DMV computers will spit it back at you. On the other hand they might find you a leftover Cali bike at a great price.
The California Air Resources Board (CA EPA) holds all the cards.

AS far as newish used bikes are concerned, you can try living in the shadows and ride it with out of state plates and have the annual renewal forms mailed to you. Which can blow up on you when you get pulled over with your CA driver's license and Nevada plates. There are title service companies which operate out of Alabama, etc who will "perfect" your title for a couple of hundred bucks. Not sure what the current status is with them.

There are other considerations but like I said originally, you can do it but at what cost do you chase a discount. Those two lines cross pretty early on. Let us know how you do ...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,477 Posts
Unless you are willing and able to really learn how to properly brake a non abs bike, then by all means please buy a abs bike. It's not a slam, I read into your opening post that you already acknowledge your skill limitations at this point in time.
Based on that, i highly recommend abs and want you to think about getting more training/instruction when you do have that new bike. Achieving more skills is a wonderful thing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Unless you are willing and able to really learn how to properly brake a non abs bike, then by all means please buy a abs bike. It's not a slam, I read into your opening post that you already acknowledge your skill limitations at this point in time.
Based on that, i highly recommend abs and want you to think about getting more training/instruction when you do have that new bike. Achieving more skills is a wonderful thing.
Thanks! And yes, I am DEFINITELY going to either re-take the basic rider course, or perhaps at least some kind of "refresher" course. (I found that one local provider of the basic course also offers a refresher course on your own bike, which might be better than spending two days on a different bike.) And much parking lot practice. (Churches on Saturdays are often great for this. :) )
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,802 Posts
There should simply be no question for you given your history ....learning to brake effectively without ABS is a very long learning curve and completely unnecessary.

Get a bike with ABS ....period full stop.

What you don't need to be concerned with is mileage. As long as it's well maintained the Stroms are the energizer bunnies...I bought mine with 100,000 km on it and it has 130,000 on now and aside from a stator issue this summer has been bullet proof.

I got my 2010 with luggage, with upgrade front forks and a few other farkles for $2400. a couple years ago.They are strong reliable bikes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
AS long as you never forget that this is your time and money we're talking about here_ hold on tightly to it until someone can guarantee you the results you want.

There is a difference between an older, exempted vehicle and new/old stock. If there is a particular NOS deal you want on a out of state bike it should be done via a dealer swap. That is to say your dealer will arrange to get it for you. At that point you may find that they can't do it. Not because they are money-evil-cheaters but because the Cali bikes have different gas tanks and CPUs and carbon canisters which are reflected in the VIN #. The CA DMV computers will spit it back at you. On the other hand they might find you a leftover Cali bike at a great price.
The California Air Resources Board (CA EPA) holds all the cards.

AS far as newish used bikes are concerned, you can try living in the shadows and ride it with out of state plates and have the annual renewal forms mailed to you. Which can blow up on you when you get pulled over with your CA driver's license and Nevada plates. There are title service companies which operate out of Alabama, etc who will "perfect" your title for a couple of hundred bucks. Not sure what the current status is with them.

There are other considerations but like I said originally, you can do it but at what cost do you chase a discount. Those two lines cross pretty early on. Let us know how you do ...
Indeed, I know it can be a pain. Hell, when my whole family moved down with me in 2008, it was a hassle just to import our used Dodge Grand Caravan, even though it met CA standards.

Good news is, this page says it should be OK if it's more than 7,500 miles, or if it's good to California standards. So, if it's new old stock, I guess I get them to check the emissions sticker, and then consider talking to a CA dealer for a swap. Thank you very much!
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top