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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I had a rear tire puncture while riding, recently. :furious: In a location with no cell service. And was not prepared.

So, now to be able to deal with it next time.... (hopefully there isn't a next time)
Can I plug a tire, so I can get home? Is there a preferred kit?
What is a good way to inflate a tire, on the road, that can be carried on a bike?
 

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With our tubless tires the easiest way is to plug it, air back up and ride. I carry a tire plug kit(about $2 at wallyworld) and a small 12v air compressor under my seat. Motorcycle specific plug kits also offer Co2 cartridges instead of a air pump....it's your choice:
GENUINE INNOVATIONS - Ultraflate Plus CO2 Tire Inflation and Repair Kit - Tubes - Tire Accessories - Tires - Cycle Gear

Slime Deluxe Reamer Plugger - Walmart.com

Slime Top Off Tire Inflator - Walmart.com

Now, once plugged you have to make a decision. Go with the tire company's recommendation and replace that tire as soon as possible. Or, ride it until it's worn out. It is a personal choice on how much risk you are willing to take. Personally I have well over 100,000 miles on plugged tires without an issue. I have never seen a plugged tire blow out, but have seen many virgin one's let go so in my opinion it's all a crap shoot.
 

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Yes you can plug a tire to get home. Many people will tell you that the plug is ok to ride on for the rest of the life of the tire, just as many will tell you to replace the tire as soon as possible. The choice is yours. There are also many tire plug kits out there. Personally I carry the Nealy kit. Nealey Tire Repair Kit - Repair Kits. It is small and inexpensive so if it gets old I can easily and i expensively replace it. Make sure you have a pump too. I carry this one http://www.slime.com/us/products/auto/inflators/12v-auto-/power-sport.php A bit or research on the interwebs will give you many choices.
Ride well,
John
 

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I carry the "Dynaplug" kit. Not sure it's the best but very small.
I now carry a small air compressor because the CO2 cartridge put just enough air in the tire to leave it mushy and once I was out of CO2 cartridges I had to ride that way till I found a gas station with air.

I bought a small air compressed at a garage sale and removed all the plastic to reduce its size. The compressor gets very hot so I have a thin copper wire attached to it to use as a handle so I can hold it.
 

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I have the Stop n' Go compressor with the mushroom plug kit. I added string plugs just in case. I never leave home with out it.
 

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The mushroom plugs are useless...the strings work fine ..that Compressor is fine too.
We had to use two strings to plug the Wee rear after two mushroom plugs failed to seal (you might get to a service station is all ).

That string patch is now a year old and holding perfectly. The strings actually vulcanize into the tire and it's mature technology. Several experienced riders I know have run plugs til the tire is worn out.

Much depends on where the leak is ....mine was in an ideal position to patch. A tire is tough so good tools to get the plug seated is important.
 
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aka Rick in Alabama
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Over the last 25 years I've plugged and or patched a half-dozen motorcycle tires (or tubes) with no problems. Only once have I had a failure after patching a tube, and that was because I pinched the tube when reinstalling the tire. I've never had a plug fail after plugging a tire.

I do have several guidelines for what I consider to be safe/unsafe for plugging:

1. The hole must be pluggable with one cord type plug. If it's larger than that the tire is either replaced, gets an inside cord-type plug/patch, or gets the plug/patch and a tube.

2. The hole cannot be more than an inch off of either side of centerline or I (a) install a tube, or (be) replace the tire

3. A hole or cut in the sidewall gets an immediate tire replacement

Patches on tubes are a creature all their own. The tube I mentioned above ended up with 3 patches on it. I finished the last half of a 5,500 mile trip running that tube, and replaced it only when I replaced the tires a year later.

I carry a Slime tire kit and compressor, and an extra set of cord type plugs from Autozone.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, everybody for the tips. I was initially thinking of a plug kit to be able to "limp" the bike home. From your info it seems that a tire with a good quality plug can be used to the end of it's life if I decide to.
I live 45 miles from the nearest Walmart/Tractor Supply/NAPA, etc, but I will check them for a repair kit and small compressor the next time I am near.
 

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I like the brown gummy strings- any hardware or autoparts store has them. Use the rubber cement from the kit to lube the hole when you apply them. They bond well to the inside of the tire; they will not pop out-- it's hard to 'push a rope'-- like some of the mushroom plugs do (personal experience with both.)

The failure mode for a gummy string would be a small leak around the string, much smaller than the original hole you started with.

I became very confident in these strings when I had a bike with tire pressure monitors. Mile after mile at regular highway speeds, no pressure loss. I monitored one plug repair for several thousand miles until the tire was worn out.

I have had leaks that could not be fixed by strings (a small slash from a piece of metal) but a couple of strings stuffed in there kept it inflated enough to ride safely to a shop for a new tire. I stopped every couple of hours to add air to the tire.

Drill a few holes in an old tire you are replacing and practice using your kit in the garage, instead of doing it for the first time in the rain, in the dark without a flashlight, or on the wrong side of the tracks. :frown:

................shu
 

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PLUG TIRE- Harbor Freight

...will check them for a repair kit and small compressor the next time I am near.
Harbor Freight tools: The Reamer, probe and PLUG (5) KIT runs about $ 5.00 or $3.99 with coupon.
They also have a small yellow compressor about the size of a Gatorade bottle. Thats about $ 10.00 or less. It comes with a ciggy lighter "plug" on it but you can cut it off and replace with alligator clips and go straight to battery.
These may be cheap Chinese knockoffs of the REAL stuff but they work fine, bout 15 bucks. You can also pick up a pressure CAN of FIX A FLAT at Walmart for $ 6.00 Having a Leatherman on your belt also helps a lot when preforming these repairs.
 

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There is no perfect 100% reliable plug or patch. Sometimes the steel belts cut the rubber plug.

I use the Nealy kit. I had one last a year before it leaked and couldn't be re-plugged. With the Nealy kit the string is rotated to form a mushroom head inside the tire.
Nealey Tire Repair Kit - Contact Us
 

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Discussion Starter #13
With our tubless tires the easiest way is to plug it, air back up and ride. I carry a tire plug kit(about $2 at wallyworld) and a small 12v air compressor under my seat. Motorcycle specific plug kits also offer Co2 cartridges instead of a air pump....it's your choice:
GENUINE INNOVATIONS - Ultraflate Plus CO2 Tire Inflation and Repair Kit - Tubes - Tire Accessories - Tires - Cycle Gear

Slime Deluxe Reamer Plugger - Walmart.com

Slime Top Off Tire Inflator - Walmart.com

Now, once plugged you have to make a decision. Go with the tire company's recommendation and replace that tire as soon as possible. Or, ride it until it's worn out. It is a personal choice on how much risk you are willing to take. Personally I have well over 100,000 miles on plugged tires without an issue. I have never seen a plugged tire blow out, but have seen many virgin one's let go so in my opinion it's all a crap shoot.
I picked up the same inflator, some spare plugs, and found a kit similar to the WalMart one right at our local builder's supply. All for about $25. Plugged the tire, let it set for 1/2hr(ish) before inflating and went for a short ride. I checked the tire a couple days later, and holding pressure.
I'll keep an eye on it. That gives me a chance to shop around, decide whether to buy online and mount one myself, or buy one from a shop and have them mount it.
I have been contemplating the Harbor Freight changing system. What do you folks do about balancing?
 

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I bought a tire balancer from MJ Moto Gear Stands, Tire Warmers, Other Track Gear,. Mark Parnes sells a similar one. The one from MJ Motogear is $36.00. I built a simple wooden jig to hold the tire balancer; the jig fits in my old Black and Decker workbench. When I'm not using the jig, it hangs on my garage wall. It works great, for all different sized motorcycle tires.

Some guys use Dynabeads. Some guys don't balance them at all, unless they ride them and notice that there's a vibration. I guess I'm old school, and still use wheel weights.
 

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I have been contemplating the Harbor Freight changing system. What do you folks do about balancing?
I also have the HF MC changer. I used to balance my own tires with two jack stands and a shaft to go through the rim and rest on the jacks, then add or subtract lead. Now I use Ride-On...no more balancing, and the bonus is the puncture protection:
http://www.amazon.com/Ride-Tire-Balancer-Sealant-41208/dp/B0016680T0

Here is my thread on the HF tire changer:
http://www.stromtrooper.com/general-v-strom-discussion/274890-how-do-you-spoon-off-tire-without-tearing-up-powder-coating.html
 
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