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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm attending a rally in Death Valley in a few weeks that involves riding in some pretty desolate areas and I want to be able to repair a sidewall puncture. I always have a slime compressor and tire worms for nail punctures so that is good to go.
My thoughts are to carry an emergency tube that is sized for the front that I can stuff into the rear if needed. I've never changed a motorcycle tire. So, my question is, can someone point me to a thread or two that describes how to install a tube on the trail and what tools are needed? I can manage to get the wheels off/on the bike using the available tools I carry, including the 16 mm for the the front axel. From my searching, I'll need some tire spoons, a valve puller, a large C clamp, WD-40 for lubing the bead and maybe a ratchet strap.
I am running Anakee III's front and rear and I will not be getting too gnarly offroad, mostly graded dirt with the possibility of some sections having lots of washboard.
Carrying a tube and the neccessary tools may be overkill for this type of riding but the ride leaders are requesting everyone have this ability. I don't know if they realize some of us have tubeless tires.
 

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...My thoughts are to carry an emergency tube that is sized for the front that I can stuff into the rear if needed. I've never changed a motorcycle tire. So, my question is, can someone point me to a thread or two that describes how to install a tube on the trail and what tools are needed? I can manage to get the wheels off/on the bike using the available tools I carry, including the 16 mm for the the front axel. From my searching, I'll need some tire spoons, a valve puller, a large C clamp, WD-40 for lubing the bead and maybe a ratchet strap...
While anything can happen, if you keep reasonable air pressure in your tires the odds of that sort of puncture happening are really low, IMO.
If you do really want to be ready though I'd recommend practicing at home. Tire changing is one of those things that gets easier with practice, the first few times are often a nightmare. Roadside in the middle of nowhere isn't the place to learn.
 

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I wouldn't worry about it. I've done a fair amount of off road in DV and never been concerned. There are some up hill rocky washes, but most avoid them unless on a smaller bike and have plenary of dirt experience.
Be sure to ride Titus canyon and expect lots of washboard in most areas.
 

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My thought is if you puncture a tubeless tire more than what a worm will fix, you need a new tire, not a tube and possibly a new wheel. I may be over thinking it or wrong but a simple tire repair kit is all you'll need. That's all I carry.

As far as changing the tire on the trail, as mentioned, practice at home. It's not difficult, but it isn't exactly a cake walk either. Particularly when you only have the ground to lay the wheel on and nothing to hold it.
 

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Cheap tire plug kit and a slime pump......good to go!!!!
 

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A sidewall puncture can not be repaired. Use of a tube might get you home, but no high speed highway riding.

You need to remove the wheel, deflate the tire, work one bead off the rim, remove the valve, put the tube in, reseat the bead, inflate, reinstall the wheel. Note the rim hump that the bead needs to slip over to seat on a tubeless wheel. You need lube on this and maybe a compressor with good capacity. Practice at home before you need to do this in the desert.

You'll probably need to break the beads on both sides. To get the bead over the rim, you need to squeeze the beads together and slip the beads on one side into the recessed center of the rim to give room for the bead across the wheel from you to clear over the rim.


(I'm thinking of the wheel as having three parts--hub, spokes, and the rim of the wheel.)
 

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I think I'd break the bead , and try to put a big patch on the inside. Use a lot of glue, and wait a half hour before you try to rebead it. blow it back up pretty tight and replace it ASAP.
If you don't air down for offroad, a sidewall puncture would be rare
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanx all. I think I'm going to stick with what I normally carry and not worry about carrying a tube or the ability to change it.
 

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On my sidecar rig I felt as though I was the flat tire KING. I carried a pair of big dude tire irons that made repairs easy. Tubeless tires are a bugger to get loose and the hole the tube runs through may be smaller the the valve assy. Something you'd want to check before hand.
The tube as a spare isn't a bad one but need some logistics worked out.
 

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As a comment, some of the DL tyres, like the K60, will run flat without major issues for long distances provided you keep the speed down (20kph or so).
And 20kph is still 10x faster than walking ;)

That won't work for ALL DL tyres, but for some it's a viable plan-B ;)

Pete
 
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