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Tire Mount & Balance Cost at Dealer w/ tire purchase?

  • X < $50/ tire

    Votes: 3 60.0%
  • $51-60/tire

    Votes: 2 40.0%
  • $61-70/tire

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • $71-80/tire

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • $81-90/tire

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • $91+/tire

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    5
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

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Discussion Starter #1
How much should I expect to pay to mount and balance tires for a ‘19 DL1000? Assume that tires are purchased from the dealer and the bike will be dropped off (wheels and tires aren’t removed).

Just curious if the cost I was quoted ($70 front and $90 rear) is par for the course. Thank you.
 

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if they've gotta pull the wheel it takes longer and costs more. i schedule to drop off the wheel and wait the 30 minutes or less it takes to swap and balance. cost about $30CAN and gives me the opportunity to grease everything up on reassembly
 

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Check the labor rates at your dealer. On the bike changes cost more due to the $ Labor Rates. Takes longer than 'Off The Bike'. :cool:
 

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My dealer sell tires at a discount, if I remove them from the bike they mount and balance for free.. :)
 
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Bring the wheels and tire here and I'll change them and properly dispose of the old tires for a case of beer. My tire machine long ago has paid for itself not it works for beer.
Travel cost might be a little high. I must admit I am lazy. My brother has a NOMAR, but he is on the other side of town. I know the service manager at the Yamaha dealer near my office. He personally changes them while I talk smack with him and has treated me very well over the years.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Decided to go the other route. Found a good place locally that will do mount and balance for $28/ea with the wheels removed If you order tires from them. Just have to figure out how I’m going to go about supporting the bike to remove the front wheel.

Looking forward to checking out the Dunlop Trailmax Mission.
 

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Took me about an hour to do my front on the garage floor, partially because after carefully studying out the rotation, I still screwed it up, finding out as I was putting on the bike. Oh well, breaking the bead the 2nd time was very easy. Back tire job starts Tomorrow if it’s raining. My times not worth much anymore. Helps avoid honey do’s.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Aren't the numbers sort of meaningless if the markup on the tires is not included? I've seen some places that have a lower labor fee, but the tires are more costly. A tire price closer to mail order prices will come with a higher mount/balance charge.

I ended up buying a used No-Mar changer from a dealer that was upgrading. It's paid for itself over the years and the convenience of not having to go anywhere is great. No dealers in town except for a Harley/John Deere place, so I order online. I also change rubber for friends that stop by.
 

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Aren't the numbers sort of meaningless if the markup on the tires is not included? I've seen some places that have a lower labor fee, but the tires are more costly. A tire price closer to mail order prices will come with a higher mount/balance charge.

I ended up buying a used No-Mar changer from a dealer that was upgrading. It's paid for itself over the years and the convenience of not having to go anywhere is great. No dealers in town except for a Harley/John Deere place, so I order online. I also change rubber for friends that stop by.

Yes the saving go way beyond the cost of the changing.

1. Buying tires online typically saves 20% to 50% over buying at the dealership.
2. You get to order the tires of you choice when you want and keep riding on the current tires until the new one arrive. No more taking the wheels/bike into the shop and settling for what's in stock or ordering tires then leaving the wheels/bike there and making return trip a day or two later
3. You get to choose when you want to change tires. No more being at the mercy of the dealerships schedule.
4. You can totally wear out tires. I changed lots of tires for friends that had 1,000 or 2,000 miles left in them but they were going on a trip and wanted fresh rubber. If relying on a dealership its not worth reinstalling the used tires when your trip is over but if you change your own it is. I'll put on fresh rubber for a trip then when get home put the old tire on it and finish it up.

If you factor in all the saving the cost of a tire machine pays for itself much faster than you think.

There are negatives as well.

1. You have to have a way to get wheels off and do the work.
2. You have additional tools and machinery taking up space
3. You have to have space to do the work
4. A bigger air compressor is helpful.
5. Not as easy as paying someone else to do it
6. Tire disposal. Around here any shop that sells tires will take old tires for $2 each. But you still gotta get them there.

If you have one bike and go through a set of tires every couple of years it probably not worth investing in the tools and gaining the knowledge to change you own. But if you go through a set per year or more it can easily be worth the investment. Then as soon as your buddies find you have a tire machine look out.
 

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local shop, was a multi bike dealer until recently. Just a shop now. $37.50 for a mount and balance.
Convenient, a mile down the street.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Now that I have all the required tools and equipment, the next tire change should only set me back ~$72 (install cost).

Looks like I’ll have to start commuting again shortly. If I start doing that again, I’ll likely need another set by December, at the latest.
 

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Dealer put Michelin Anakee 2 on the rear Friday. $82

I need to get setup to do it myself it’s just too much money.
 

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I'm happy there's one local shop that only charges $25 per swap. If not for him, I would have set up to do it at home long ago

Everyone else wants $50+ for mount and balance, even if you buy the tire from them, even if you save them labor by bringing just the wheel.

I also bought the tire from the shop this time around. Steep markups aren't universal apparently. I only paid about $9 more than I would have through RevZilla, and I hadn't been able to find it cheaper anywhere else. He had just given me a deal on a fork rebuild so I had no prob throwing an extra $9 his way.
 
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