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Discussion Starter #1
I realize the topic has been around for years, just wanted to "un-earth" it to see if anyone is using a current model tire monitoring system?? I like the system that supplies a separate monitoring screen (small) vs. using a cellphone app...…..as of right now, I don't ride with my cell phone out in the open to see. There is a Garmin system out there...…..does it send signals to certain Garmin GPS Systems to be displayed?? Pros and Cons of each system, if you are experienced with them. I know at least one system recommends steel valve stems...…...which I don't have and don't feel like installing at the moment.
mark444
 

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My Garmin Zumo 590 GPS has TPMS. Last week (or the week before) I was about 100 km from home and it gave me a low pressure warning for my rear tire. The Garmin system also has an app in the GPS that shows a graph of the pressure drop. From that I was able to see I could make it home if I topped up the tire. I have a plug kit and compressor under the seat and have repaired over 20 punctures but prefer to do it in my heated garage vs roadside when it's just above freezing.

..Tom
 

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I have one that is very similar to this one.
There are many that look identical and they are probably all manufactured by the same outfit and marketed by different outlets. It works fine. Easy to install, accurate, and inexpensive. It does not affect tire balance either.


Also available on Amazon.
 

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I recently upgraded form $0.75 pencil gauges to a $12 slime digital tire gauge to monitor my and adjust my tire pressures. Does this count?
How well does it work while riding?

..Tom
 

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I'm curious:
The accuracy / feature differences between the kind that threads on to the top of the valve stem and the ones which are a part of their own valve stem?
Audio notification to a smart phone?
 

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I have the same system as Tom. You can have the GPS show the pressure real time, if you want, plus it gives you a low pressure (you set the threshold) warning. I have mine mounted on shorty straight metal stems. I had 90* stems before but they were terrible, always wanting to turn and after a few month starting to leak and just a pita. So get the best stems you can find, not the cheapest and never change a stem again, maybe the core.

On one of my trips I had a rear tire blowout, a big hole, at about 75-80 on the interstate in the west. I realized the blowout only once the tire started to disintegrate. It was so damaged that it had a bump and left of center the diameter was larger than at center and it had charcoal like substance on the inside. But thanks to the toughness of these tires, it held air with a double string patch for another 35 or so miles until we reached a Harley dealership two exits further at 4 pm on a Saturday. They held the shop open for us and by 5 pm we were back on the road. I was running a ME880 (Sportster size) tire on my WEE, a real long distance tire, but oversize.

So the take home from this:
1. I can't say more praise about Harley dealerships!
2. A TPM would have allowed me to pull over before the tire was ruined and I could have plugged it and rode the final 1500 miles home with that tire.
 

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Another Garmin TPMS user here, works great for all reasons mentioned above.

Pricey, but worth it if you already have a compatible Garmin TPMS.
 

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Happy with mine. Other one the cap heads got lost when I sold the bike - guy would not return my emails :(
 

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I have a "Mercu Wireless Digital Motorcycle Tire Pressure Gauge Monitoring System", what a mouthful. Looks identical to the ones @drrod & @Macdoc have except for the name. A little fiddly to setup initially but has worked great. The original batteries only lasted about 6 months, but I carry spares.

Oh, and purchased off Amazon for a tad over half of what a single Garmin sensor costs.



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Discussion Starter #12
I don't think my new Gamin 396 LMT-S is capatable with the Garmin Tire Sensors...…..at least I saw that comment on a GPS City reply to someone else. You guys using these sensors, which ones REQUIRE (or recommend by the manufacturer) using metal valve stems ??
 

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I had always heard you should run metal valve stems, probably cause Garmin strongly recommends it with theirs. My off brand ones did not mention it in the manual and I have run with the regular short rubber valve stems for about 7,000 miles and no issues.

I think you are correct, the 396 doesn't do tire sensors.



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I have been using TPMS on my bikes and cars for many years, they are great, most times you get to choose where and when you fix the problem because you get early notification.

I had the Garmin system but gave it away to another forum member for free, it works but I only use my Zumo on long rides and I like to have the pressures constantly displayed.

Sometimes my bike will feel different and the first thought through my head is are my pressures good ? a quick glance and I have my answer.

For my cars I use Tyredog, they have been brilliant.

I tried a number of different brands on my bikes, I found some were just too hard to set up and I like to keep my phone in my pocket, I would not like to be separated from my phone should I crash and burn.

I'm unable to do Ebay links but I can tell you how to find the one I use "Type in motor cycle (two words) TPMS you should find it."

I like that one because it is easy to mount, a cable tie around the right hand mirror stalk will have the display hiding behind the brake master cylinder.

They beep, flash and vibrate when things go wrong.
 

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My Wee caught a bolt and went flat as i was entering the parking lot of Newcombs Ranch on Hwy 2. When I got a trailer and attempted to roll the bike 20-30 feet onto the trailer, the rear Shinko 705 tire just about rolled off the rim.
In the event of a sudden flat at speed I'll be on my ass long before an electronic pressure gauge will bad giving me the bad news.
On another occasion on Hwy 2 A Shinko 705 got a sharp rock puncture from the chip seal that was being applied. Even without a gauge I could tell the tire was going flat. Always carry a repair kit. Knowing you are going flat will not be of use if you can't fix it.
 

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For those that have the Mercu, Sykik or similar:
Are you using them on rubber stems without trouble? They seem to caution against but it's unclear if that's just because of the theft-deterrent locknut, or for some more important reason.
Also, can you set separate alarm limits for front and rear?
 

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My Wee caught a bolt and went flat as i was entering the parking lot of Newcombs Ranch on Hwy 2. When I got a trailer and attempted to roll the bike 20-30 feet onto the trailer, the rear Shinko 705 tire just about rolled off the rim.
In the event of a sudden flat at speed I'll be on my ass long before an electronic pressure gauge will bad giving me the bad news.
On another occasion on Hwy 2 A Shinko 705 got a sharp rock puncture from the chip seal that was being applied. Even without a gauge I could tell the tire was going flat. Always carry a repair kit. Knowing you are going flat will not be of use if you can't fix it.
You could not know at what point you picked up the bolt, I have lost count of the number of times my systems have picked up fast and slow leaks.

I carry repair kits in my cars and bikes but because of the early warning you are not waiting till you loose enough air to feel it, you can run 32psi and have it alarm at 30psi, you will never feel the loss of 2 psi and choosing to fix it in a safe place or under a shade tree on a hold tree hot day is worth the cost of the system in my book.

One example the bride and were out to dinner and had then planned to go to the speedway to watch the cars race, after dinner my alarm sounded to tell me the rear was low on pressure, I found a bolt in the tire, I decided to ride home on the low pressure and watch the pressure did not get too low, I worked out where I could get air if needed, I do carry a pump but the convenience of a stations air made more sense, I made it home and plugged the hole the next day in the comfort and safety of my home not at the car races.

Another time I was holidaying with my family when my cars system told me my back left was loosing air, I drive a wagon and the spare tire and jack are stored under the cargo floor so to get at it would need to empty the all the stuff out of the car, by knowing I was loosing air and knowing just how fast I was loosing air I was able to drive to the next town, pull into a service station, plug the tire and use their compressor to fill it up again, I got to choose where and when I fixed the leak and all without using a jack or removing a wheel, to me that is gold.

Another plus is I have not had a need to check my pressures, there it is right in front of me anytime I want to know and of course you can check your pressures ride for less than one minute and pick up a leak.
 

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My Wee caught a bolt and went flat as i was entering the parking lot of Newcombs Ranch on Hwy 2. When I got a trailer and attempted to roll the bike 20-30 feet onto the trailer, the rear Shinko 705 tire just about rolled off the rim.
In the event of a sudden flat at speed I'll be on my ass long before an electronic pressure gauge will bad giving me the bad news.
On another occasion on Hwy 2 A Shinko 705 got a sharp rock puncture from the chip seal that was being applied. Even without a gauge I could tell the tire was going flat. Always carry a repair kit. Knowing you are going flat will not be of use if you can't fix it.
Cicero, "exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis"

Just as applicable today as 2,000+ years ago.
 

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For those that have the Mercu, Sykik or similar:
Are you using them on rubber stems without trouble? They seem to caution against but it's unclear if that's just because of the theft-deterrent locknut, or for some more important reason.
Also, can you set separate alarm limits for front and rear?
I purchased the Mecru off Amazon, however the display is labeled Newell. No idea what's up with that. It looks exactly like the Sykik and Careud ones currently on Amazon.

As I said above, there was no mention of using metal valve stems with it on-line, there is no mention of it in the manual. I have put about 7,000 miles on it with standard rubber short valve stems. I have had absolutely no issues, so far. The lock nut works fine with the rubber stems, though I suppose someone could cut the valve stem off. Not sure if the sensor is of any use without the display. The display is easily removed for safe keeping, but I never did except to recharge.

It will display Bar or PSI pressures. °C or °F temperatures. You can set high pressure alerts, low pressure / leakage alerts, high temperature alerts, and low battery alerts for the front and rear tires separately.

The sensors use a button type battery. Might want to verify the number as Amazon on-line specs for mine were wrong. The display is rechargeable. I didn't really track it but it got at least several days per charge.



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The sensors use a button type battery. Might want to verify the number as Amazon on-line specs for mine were wrong. The display is rechargeable. I didn't really track it but it got at least several days per charge.
Can the display be used while it's charging?
 
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