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Discussion Starter #1
I was going to go the Harbor Fright, Mojolever route, but when I added it all up, it was about 9 tire changes at about 6-7 years before I broke even. But I am willing to try the spoon method. So, are all tire levers created equal? What about length and other considerations?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info guys. Those Stubbys look pretty good. I think I am going to try a set. If I don't like changing the tires myself, I am not out that much money.
 

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If at all possible, get someone experienced to help you through the first time. It isn't hard to do, but a little know how helps.
Tire irons/spoons with great leverage suggests you're doing it wrong.
Don't use a water based lube.
Be sure that both beads are deep in the center of the rim-opposite of where your "spooning".
Don't damage a rotor in the process.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If at all possible, get someone experienced to help you through the first time. It isn't hard to do, but a little know how helps.
Tire irons/spoons with great leverage suggests you're doing it wrong.
Don't use a water based lube.
Be sure that both beads are deep in the center of the rim-opposite of where your "spooning".
Don't damage a rotor in the process.
Thanks for the advice. I'll be watching some videos for sure. I did buy the Stubbys and their web site said if you don't place the opposite beads in the center of the rim, their spoons will break. I guess they are made of plastic. They also said a soapy water solution was ok. Do you recommend something else?

My next step will be to figure out what bead breaker I will use. Thinking of a home made 2x4 job.
 

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Which tire lube will start another "oil thread." :green_lol:
Try going to NAPA & ask for a lube that isn't water based. The water carries the possibility of oxidation of the rims & spokes. Not so important with mags, but aluminum oxidizes too.
 

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I used Lemon Pledge when I manually changed my tires last time. Worked great and smelled good also. That and I already had it and didn't need to go out and buy something else. One of the YouTube videos that I watched before my attempt mentioned it also.
 

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The Stubby tire levers are not really workable with tubeless tires -- you'll need to get some metal tire irons and use rim guards (pieces of milk jugs or shampoo bottles work fine.)

I have a set of Stubbys, and they're great for getting things started on any tire, but once you're about 3/4 of the way around on a tubeless tire, you'll need to switch. On tubed tires, you can only use Stubbys for a complete tire change on relatively loose-fitting dirtbike tires.

I'd recommend getting a QUALITY set of tire irons. You need at least two shorter irons (make sure they're forged, not the bendy stamped crap sold on cards at many moto shoppes). You'll also want a long tire iron, like this one.

The biggest mistake I see is n00bs who get impatient and try to lever on six inches of tire in one bite. Take it in very small steps, and NEVER allow yourself to get frustrated and yank hard.

With a little experience, you can easily change tires with tire irons much faster than you can with a No-Mar. While the No-Mar owner is still struggling with those stupid clamps, you're getting the job done.

A great guide:
Motorcycle Tire Changing
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The Stubby tire levers are not really workable with tubeless tires -- you'll need to get some metal tire irons and use rim guards (pieces of milk jugs or shampoo bottles work fine.)

I have a set of Stubbys, and they're great for getting things started on any tire, but once you're about 3/4 of the way around on a tubeless tire, you'll need to switch. On tubed tires, you can only use Stubbys for a complete tire change on relatively loose-fitting dirtbike tires.

I'd recommend getting a QUALITY set of tire irons. You need at least two shorter irons (make sure they're forged, not the bendy stamped crap sold on cards at many moto shoppes). You'll also want a long tire iron, like this one.

The biggest mistake I see is n00bs who get impatient and try to lever on six inches of tire in one bite. Take it in very small steps, and NEVER allow yourself to get frustrated and yank hard.

With a little experience, you can easily change tires with tire irons much faster than you can with a No-Mar. While the No-Mar owner is still struggling with those stupid clamps, you're getting the job done.

A great guide:
Motorcycle Tire Changing
Man, I really wish I knew this earlier. But Downs said they work for him? Hmm? I guess I should have just gone steel maybe, seeing the Strom is my only bike. I haven't received them yet, but I guess I'll give them a try unless shipping them back is not too much.
 

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Man, I really wish I knew this earlier. But Downs said they work for him? Hmm? I guess I should have just gone steel maybe, seeing the Strom is my only bike. I haven't received them yet, but I guess I'll give them a try unless shipping them back is not too much.

I wouldn't send them back. The Stubbys are still very useful with tubeless tires -- they're very wide and they're plastic, so you don't need to futz with rim protectors. They're great for quickly demounting the old tires -- you can often get them off all the way with the Stubbys.

They're also useful for getting the new tire most of the way on. But for that last several inches, you're most likely going to need metal tire irons. Especially if this is your first tire 'rasslin' rodeo.

Stubbys probably work a bit better with wide sportbike tires -- these are very easy to mount in the first place, and you could maybe get the job done with a set of Stubbys.

You'll find Motion Pro or Bikemaster forged steel tire irons in any shop that sells dirtbikes, so there's probably not a need to order them from somewhere.
 

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I've replaced 5 sets of tires using the same Stubby "tire irons".
 

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Around here most people use a Harbor Freight set up, even with that awful red bar. IMO its well worth getting a Mojolever for $99 shipped, no need for rim savers or additional levers. The actual tire changer was around $85 on sale when I got mine. I use the mojo blocks also, but you could easily make wood versions, wrap them with some bicycle tube pieces etc. for added bite. When I factor in that the dealer is over 30 miles away and they charge $25 per wheel off the bike I might as well do it myself. Takes less time and it is cheaper! Much cheaper than paying $100 in labor for an on bike change. I bought a cheap balancer from Harbor Freight also, not that great, but it works.

Before the Mojolever/HF combo I preferred the Motion Pro steel 15" levers, I even carried these on my bike with tube tires. You can just stand on the tire and spoon them on with two, saved my knees:



After 4 tire changes the HF set up pays for itself in my case since I have to run 60 plus miles round trip for each change. I usually don't change the front and rears at the same time. Order tires when they are on sale in the winter. Plus you change tires without any drama usually, so I keep good rubber on. Can swap out half used tires before a trip and use them up later because its a simple easy swap at home for very low cost, just a stick on weight or two and some lube.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well, my PR3 finally needed changing so I borrowed a C-clamp, got out the still-new Stubbys and went at it. I placed my rear tire and wheel on an old tire casing on plywood. It was the perfect height for this short guy to either kneel or stand on the tire. Not sure I did it "right," but it got changed using just the two Stubbys. I had a little trouble getting the first bead of the old tire to start coming off the rim. I peeled the other side of the tire off the rim by hand. I used a little WD40 to get the new tire to go over the rim. Down the street to the free air pump, and it inflated and seated fine. Just have to find a way to balance it now. It wasn't too bad over all.
 

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I carry three 8" Stockton Tool compact tire levers

http://www.amazon.com/STOCKTON-TOOL-COMPANY-Compact-Tire/dp/B0089GM2TO/ref=sr_1_18/180-7243769-7415800?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1407862268&sr=1-18

For rim protectors I cut big ovals out of the sides of 1 gallon pool chlorine jugs, but I think Sunny Delight jugs use the same heavy plastic. They are cheap and I don' like how the rim protectors with rope work. I use Windex for lube.

I've done four tires now and I'm getting better. I figured out a new trick this weekend. I tied a rope from a spoke, around the tire and to a lever to hold it in place. That let me use both hands and two levers on the other side easier. Push the near side of the tire into the center of the rim and hold it there with your knees, then keep pushing the sides down into the groove. It's still work, but I'm now confident I can mess with the tires trail-side.


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