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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all

If you remember, I shipped my Vee to Belize a few months ago and have had a black cloud over me.. The day I picked it up I stupidly dropped it at the gas station busting the headlight assembly.. This trip I replaced the assembly and took it for a quick spin around the development. Pulled in the garage and found a screw in the rear tire!

I pulled it and put in a rope plug. I am looking for new tires.... The roads are not that great here and main roads are asphalt but many are unimproved (dirt, rock, and pot holes).

I was looking at the Anakee III's but they are described as 85/15.. Would these handle the rough roads here or should I be looking at something else?

Mark
 

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If there are bad roads then I think that tire thickness is very important.

YOU have to decide how aggressive your road riding.
The size of your chicken strips, because if your not very aggressive then you can get
real semi knobs

TKC 80 or Heidenaus where ther is knobs but like 5/18 of rubber

anakee3 are street tires with BS wider groves
 

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I run the Anakee 3s. They are a good compromise until you get into mud. They handle gravel and dry dirt well and will last on rough pavement just fine. The Heindenau scouts are well reviewed and hold up very well on the road and are better than decent off road. The Heindenau is not a radial and does not do as well on wet roads as an Anakee. In a third world area I would use the Heindenau personally. The TKC tires just do not last on the rear, if you need them they are great but plan on replacing them every 3000 to 4000 miles, they can go further but by that mileage the knobs are worn enough they are equivalent to a street tire.
 

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plus 2 on the heidenaus. expensive but worth it.
 

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K60's. The fact they aren't radials isn't going to make a critical difference, but they'll stand up to bad roads and get decent life.

Pete
 

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I run a K60 on the rear and TKC in front, and can tell you that there is not one problem with the bias K60. They handle the tarmac well, wet or dry. They do lack a little in the sand and mud, but for your application, should be just fine.

The current rear has 8000 miles with over half that 2-up on bad roads/trails. the rest of the mile are commuting with a quick spin on the interstate twice a day.
 

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My old stand by tire for adventure bikes is the original Tourance. Good all around tires.

Michelin has a new TKC 70 that looks like a Tourance alternative. That might be a another option for a mild all purpose tire.


The one on the rear is a Tourance:


IMO, the TKC-80 tires didn't last long enough for me and I live on a dirt road. They handle loose stuff better though, but I like a better road tire.

I also run the cheap Shinko 705, they are a decent choice actually. Its best to learn how to change your own tires and keep a few on hand. I have a manual tire changer myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My fear with the bias tires is heat dissipation.... It is hot here in Belize and the roads are blazin hot. I am a big guy and I don't want to over stress them

Mark
 

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i'm not a tire expert but i can tell you this: i run dunlop 606's on my dr650 in nicaragua and although i hate riding road, at times its inevitable. i'm a big fat bastard myself and have never worried about the tires overheating.

keep your rubber properly inflated and they'll be fine. one more thing, belize isn't famous for having much super slab and there are few places in that country you will be able to get up to and maintain high speeds for long enough to make a difference.
 

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Mitas

E10 front ( knobby)

E07 rear

This combo Copes well in hot Australian back roads, or what they call roads here.
 
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