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Discussion Starter #1
2013 650 with 5000 mile Michelin ROAD 5 tires. The rear has started to cup slightly. I have been running 33 psi front and 36 rear as the owners manual states. I weigh 190 and ride solo.

Would higher pressure help and what about the damping adjuster on the 25,000 mile shock? I think the shock is original.
 

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In my expierence all tires eventually cup to some degree. Some worse than others with Shinko 705 fronts being the top dog.

How much thread is left?
 

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It could be suspension.
If you have a raised area on either the leading or back edge of the tread, this is a strong sign that rebound damping on the forks or shock is set either too fast or too slow. Usually if it’s on the leading edge rebound is too slow, and if it’s on the back edge it’s too fast.
By answering the above questions, you should be able to determine whether or not you have a suspension related issue.
You can Google "motorcycle tire wear patterns" and there is a ton of information.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It could be suspension.
If you have a raised area on either the leading or back edge of the tread, this is a strong sign that rebound damping on the forks or shock is set either too fast or too slow. Usually if it’s on the leading edge rebound is too slow, and if it’s on the back edge it’s too fast.
By answering the above questions, you should be able to determine whether or not you have a suspension related issue.
You can Google "motorcycle tire wear patterns" and there is a ton of information.
It could be suspension.
If you have a raised area on either the leading or back edge of the tread, this is a strong sign that rebound damping on the forks or shock is set either too fast or too slow. Usually if it’s on the leading edge rebound is too slow, and if it’s on the back edge it’s too fast.
By answering the above questions, you should be able to determine whether or not you have a suspension related issue.
You can Google "motorcycle tire wear patterns" and there is a ton of information.
The back edge is higher. Looking at the owners manual it refers to the adjustment as STIFF and SOFT. Which way and how much should I turn the screw?
 

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I use Ride-on sealant/tire balancing compound and haven’t had cupping in 34k miles. Two fronts, and three rears (three different flavors of Mitas E-07s).


I’ve bought it from my local Cycle-Gear, but don’t see it on their website.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My question is how do FAST/SLOW and SOFT/STIFF correlate? I have done some research and it seems that in order to slow the rebound down, I should turn the screw in. Am I on the right track?
 

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There are many, many Youtube vids on setting up the suspension on your bike. Watch a few. You don't just crank in a few clicks. For setting rebound, you bounce the bike and watch how the suspension reacts, make an adjustment and bounce again. After setting your rebound, you see how the tire wear has changed after 400 or so miles and then make a minor adjustment but you first have to get it in the ballpark.
 

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My question is how do FAST/SLOW and SOFT/STIFF correlate? I have done some research and it seems that in order to slow the rebound down, I should turn the screw in. Am I on the right track?
Fast means soft, as in a soft suspension bounces quickly and easily, whereas a stiff suspension is slower to bounce.
First thing is to get the preload set for the correct sag, then start with the rebound damping in the standard position as described in the owner's manual. Take a few rides over the same route, (with a few bumps, dips and curves), and experiment with minor changes until you get the ride with which you are most happy. This will vary for everyone depending on whether you want soft and cushy over bumps, or firm for tight, technical corners. As mentioned by others, you may also want to make minor adjustments based on long term tire wear.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for your concise answer to my last question. The adjuster was about 1/2 turn to the stiff side when I started, so I will go 1/2 more and increase the tire pressure.
 

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Fast means soft, as in a soft suspension bounces quickly and easily, whereas a stiff suspension is slower to bounce.
First thing is to get the preload set for the correct sag, then start with the rebound damping in the standard position as described in the owner's manual. Take a few rides over the same route, (with a few bumps, dips and curves), and experiment with minor changes until you get the ride with which you are most happy. This will vary for everyone depending on whether you want soft and cushy over bumps, or firm for tight, technical corners. As mentioned by others, you may also want to make minor adjustments based on long term tire wear.
You got rebound backwards. Soft is slow and hard is fast. If the rebound is set slow, the wheel will bounce a couple of times before settling and provide a softer ride. If the rebound is set fast, the wheel bounces and then stops so the suspension will feel hard. Now it gets even more complicated when you hit a series of bumps and you get into rebound packing.
 

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Fast and slow have to do with rebound damping, stiff and soft with compression damping. you only have to worry about rebound.

If rebound is too slow, the suspension won't spring back soon enough to take the next hit. Enough hits in row, and you can end up with no suspension travel left. It will be packed down.

If rebound is too fast, you can end up with a very bouncy ride, and the suspension will seem out of sync.

I've only ever had one rear tire cup, and that was a K60 Scout. I attribute that to the hard compound. I would quite literally drift the rear tire through corners. I'm thinking the drift caused the very scalloped wear pattern. I don't see this being a problem on a PR5. Certainly don't increase tire pressure above 36psi.
 

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I have seen Michelins cup on Stroms, GSs ,Road King's, and now my used multistrada. I believe the tire structure causes a rythmic bounce that cause it.
My '15 Wee trashed a set of Pr5s in 5k miles, without any suspension changes, I installed a set of trailwings and got over8 k miles and the wear was smooth .
An old race tech (Smokey Unik?) Spoke of tire hysteresis and how different carcass will have a different hysteresis, kind of like a frequency of bounce that exscapes the suspensions capabilities.
The RoadKing that I spoke of was a 2010 model that I bought used with the already cupped Micheline on it. It was by far the worst handling two wheeler I have ever been on. It squirmed in turns sometimes, it followed the edge of road patches like it was an a squiggly slot car track. After spending a lot of time proofing the suspension,mounts and bearings to no avail, I replaced the Michelins with Harley recommended Dunlops - done! It was fixed.
I love Micheline on my big GM 4x4s, but I will not have them on another bike, just my 87 cents worth
 

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Similar experience with PR5 tires, 7500 kms, badly cupped. Had PR4 before no problem and now riding on Metzler Roadtec 01 for 7,000 kms with no issues.
 
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