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So I live in NYC and motorcycle shops want 120 to 200 to install a pair of tires, last year same shop did for 80 now wants 125 for pair or 70 for 1. On general principle can't pay that as I can get a car tire patched for 15 to 20 bucks at a local flat fix shop, tip the guy 10 bucks and he looks at u like jesus.... Basically will end up changing own tires not to have a bloody anus. Question is do I really need to balance a nice set of Michelin tires? Cam I just line up valve with light spot and call it a day?
 

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I always just take the wheel in and have them change out the tire and balance. only costs about $30 CAN per wheel. it's the extra labour that's driving up the price.

I'd say that balancing is quite important, you can purchase a unit to do them at home, might pay for itself in time.
 

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Some will say it's ok, some will say your bike will explode. Personal experience, I don't balance and haven't noticed any problems.
 

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I would go ahead and balance the tire as peace of mind.

Motorcycle tire balancers are not very expensive on ebay. pick up some adhesive lead weights while you're at it.

If you have the room in your house. look into a motorcycl tire changer. Like you, I did the math on the cost of mc tire replacement. With just a few tire replacement, you will get your money back. especially when you have dirt bikes.

Check on No-Mar Classic tire changer. I didn't like the bottom tier brand by no-mar. the classic seems like the best for the cost.
 

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I always run Michelin PR4s (or whatever PR version is current).

I always change and balance myself, just balancing the wheel-tire assembly on its axle, suspended over a couple 5-gallon pails. IMHO, that works surprisingly well, and the price is right.

Balance matters, I think, but just my opinion, and maybe only if a lot of time is going to be spent at 80 MPH+ (indicated). (My bike spends a fair amount of time there).

Even with Michelins, I find wheel-tire assemblies always out of balance. The problem is mostly in the wheel, in my experience (I've played around with balancing the wheel only (no tire), and it takes quite a bit of weight just to balance the wheel). On the plus side, little, if any, extra weight is then required to balance the wheel-tire assemblies.

Believe it or not, I'd noticed that, when I'd turn loose, completely, of the handlebars of my bike, the head would shake some. At that time all wheel weights were on one side of the wheel (yeah, dumb, but I didn't think it would matter, being so close to the centerline of the bike). At next tire change I tried to put the same number of weights on both sides of the wheel. Made a big difference in "head shake" with hands off the bars.

Live and learn...

:smile2:
 

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I have a Michelin PR4 on the front of my 650 and a Road 5 on the rear, yes they need balanced. Good luck finding the light spot, Michelins aren't marked. I do them myself with stick on weights and a Harbor Freight balencer except when a friend offers his machines.
 

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So I live in NYC and motorcycle shops want 120 to 200 to install a pair of tires, last year same shop did for 80 now wants 125 for pair or 70 for 1. On general principle can't pay that as I can get a car tire patched for 15 to 20 bucks at a local flat fix shop, tip the guy 10 bucks and he looks at u like jesus.... Basically will end up changing own tires not to have a bloody anus. Question is do I really need to balance a nice set of Michelin tires? Cam I just line up valve with light spot and call it a day?
I dont see how you can compare patching a car tire to replacing motorcycle tires. And are you talking removing and reinstalling the rims yourself?
You dont NEED to do anything! But why wouldnt you balance? And how does someone else's not balancing affect what you do?
If youre that destitute where an additional $40 would keep you from riding, should you even own a motorcycle in the 1st place?
You dont pay to have them balanced. You pay to know they are in balance. Some tires Ive replaced required no weight to balance, but those were few and far between. I have yet to see a motorcycle or car tire manufacturer state that their tires do not need balancing. Have you?
Why would you cheap out on "a nice set of Michelin tires"?
 

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Get some tire levers and change your own tires. It's more of a technique thing than a brute force thing!



I used to balance tires and have used Dyna Beads and Ride On. I don't bother anymore just line up the mark on the tire with the valve stem. Highway speeds here are 80+ mph, bike is smooth. My advice is mount the tires and take it for a ride. If vibration is bothering you balance the tires.
 
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Well this can become a long debate.

You can balance the tire on the axle with suitable support. I use a couple of car jack stands. Takes a bit of patience but it works.

An interesting exercise is to check the balance of the worn old tire before you remove it. Then decide if balancing is not overrated. As mentioned above, if you find vibrations at certain speeds, you may need to go back and balance the wheels.
 

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I won't feel as mad when i pay 80$cdn to have my tires installed...
 

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I have used ride on tire balancing liquid. (thick liquid) in time it turns thicker and doesn't work. I use the tire balancing beads and they work great for me. You could try not balancing your tires and then add the beads if you need to. as good as they work I would just put the beads in when replacing the tires and be done with it.
 

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Is that cost for just bringing the bike in and them doing the removal too. Or that much for you removing them and just dropping the wheels.
 

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Wow! 13 replies following the opening post, and not one response from the OP.
He must've not gotten the answer he was looking for,i.e. the easiest cheapest way out.
 

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I'll never pay someone again to change my motorcycle tires. Even if you take them off yourself, you still have to haul them to a shop (in my case, it's a 50 minute drive one way), and either wait around if they can do it that day, or come back another day to pick them up. It's too much wasted time and money for me. Especially since I go through 3-4 tires every year.

The video posted by Spec is the one that springboarded me into changing my own. You don't need fancy tools; all I have are four spoons, six rim protectors (which aren't necessary, especially if your rims are already old and beat up), something to break the bead, some tire lube, and a compressor. And you don't need a big high powered compressor; I seat the beads using an ancient 12 volt tire inflator compressor. I break the beads with a plastic wedge (a Motion Pro Bead Popper) and a dead blow hammer.

Yesterday I changed both tires on my bike. Took off some E07's and put on some Shinkos. The whole process, including balancing the new tires, took four hours. It would have taken longer than that (and cost a lot more) for me to take them off, schlep them to a shop, wait around, then bring them home and put them on the bike.

I always balance mine, but I'm always tempted not to and see what happens. The main reason I don't is the hassle of taking them off again to balance them, if it turns out they can't go without it. I had to add an ounce of weight to the Shinko rear this time; I don't know if that one ounce would be noticeable or not when riding, if I hadn't done it. I've read lots of accounts from guys on line who don't do it and don't experience any ill effects, but I'll probably always do it. I bought a Marc Parnes balancing stand several years ago and it works great. They're a little pricey, but Harbor Freight makes one with a similar design that's only $40.00.

For what it costs where you live for a shop to change one tire, you could buy all the tools you need to do it yourself, and never again have to pay someone to do it for you.
 

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Decent enough video, but I would add a couple things. Always use a new valve if using rubber, or check the seal and torque if using an aftermarket metal valve. Tie the two rim protectors together with a foot or so of nylon cord. This will help you fish one out from inside the tire if one falls inside.
Be careful where your fingers are when seating the bead. I didn't like how close his left hand was to the rim/tire interface while inflating with the right hand.
Finally, windex contains some glass cleaners which may be harmful to rubber. I use Murphy Oil Soap, a vegetable based cleaner. Slippery as snot and also a good hand cleaner when you're done.
 

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After something Greywolf said years ago, I no longer use any sort of soap for a tire lube. I went to NAPA and bought a jug of RuGlyde. It was only about 10 bucks for a gallon, and it's specifically for tire changes.

LOL, I rarely change my tire stems. I think the one that's in my rear tire now has been there for the past at least three tires.
 

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Yesterday I changed both tires on my bike. Took off some E07's and put on some Shinkos. The whole process, including balancing the new tires, took four hours. It would have taken longer than that (and cost a lot more) for me to take them off, schlep them to a shop, wait around, then bring them home and put them on the bike.

I always balance mine, but I'm always tempted not to and see what happens. The main reason I don't is the hassle of taking them off again to balance them, if it turns out they can't go without it. I had to add an ounce of weight to the Shinko rear this time; I don't know if that one ounce would be noticeable or not when riding, if I hadn't done it. I've read lots of accounts from guys on line who don't do it and don't experience any ill effects, but I'll probably always do it. I bought a Marc Parnes balancing stand several years ago and it works great. They're a little pricey, but Harbor Freight makes one with a similar design that's only $40.00. .
Would you mind sharing as to why you went from Mitas E07 to Shinkos? I presume 804/805?

I am in a position where I will need to replace my tires soon. I been thinking the Mitas E07 in the back and Continental TKC80 in the front. Then I read about how Shinkso 804/805 are good.
If the Mitas E07 did well for you, why was the reason you switched to Shinkos.
Thanks,
 

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LOL, I rarely change my tire stems. I think the one that's in my rear tire now has been there for the past at least three tires.
I'm sure they will last 3 or 4 tires, as they last 50000+ miles on cars, but they are so cheap I like to change them.
As for real tire mounting lube, I can't argue with that, designed for the job, can't go wrong. I use Murphys for wood cleaning and always have some around, guess I've just gotten used to it.
 
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