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OK I have been wondering about motor cycle tires and how they are balanced. Can anyone tell me how it is done? I see no weights on the rims now and was curious.
 
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Two methods, stick on and clip on weights. FWIW, I haven't balanced a tire in years on a bike beyond the original weights that I feel do more to balance the rim rather than the tire, and have never had vibration or wear issues.
 
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Balance!

When mounting a tire you have to see where the tire has the yellow or white dot! It depends on the tire company what color they use. Line that up with the valve stem and place on a spin balancer. Sometimes youll get lucky and need very little or no weight. If it needs a lot of weight change the location of the tire (DOT) by letting air out and turning the tire(DOT) either foreward/backwards from the valve stem until least amount of weight is needed. Dont forget to watch the direction arrows on tire. (Direction of rotation) If mount/spin the tire in wrong direction it will never balance! Always worked good for me! Bob.
 
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The last three sets I have bought have been Michelin's (most recently a set of Anakees last week) and they had no dots indicating the light spot. Others I have talked to, say fewer tires now have them. I can only conclude that tires are better balanced overall than they used to be.
 

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Cheff said:
This is what I use, and it works great. Even on the XR650 that has 2 rim locks there is no bouncing. I use it on the CTD3500 with 35" tires and no vibration.

http://www.innovativebalancing.com/

I have used other balancing media over the years, but this is the best so far.
Cheff, that looks real interesting! Do you change the tires yourself, then just pour the beads in for balancing? What all is needed to change tubeless tires? I've changed tubed tires before (tractor) but never before on my bike -- my last bike had tubed tires and I took the wheels off and took them to the dealer for install :oops: If I can avoid that scenario in the future, I would consider that a good thing :D
 

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Interesting topic, it seems to me in the US and Canada you guys do these tyre issues usually yourself? In Hungary (Europe) we have a lot of shops exclusively doing tyre repairs. We simply remove the tyres at home and let them do the job. They get special machines for both the tyre removal/reinstall and the balancing. Not too expensive and they have professional tools avoiding to hurt the rims of the tyres.
 

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In the US it is apparently expensive to get tires mounted (I have seen prices quoted of $70.00 per tire) Here in Toronto I have a small independant mech who charges $10.00 if I bring him the rim & tires. He charges $30.00 if he has to remove them from the bike 8) Sounds like we get a great deal in comparison to my American friends

mokusbajusz said:
Interesting topic, it seems to me in the US and Canada you guys do these tyre issues usually yourself? In Hungary (Europe) we have a lot of shops exclusively doing tyre repairs. We simply remove the tyres at home and let them do the job. They get special machines for both the tyre removal/reinstall and the balancing. Not too expensive and they have professional tools avoiding to hurt the rims of the tyres.
 

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kurt1305 said:
The last three sets I have bought have been Michelin's (most recently a set of Anakees last week) and they had no dots indicating the light spot. Others I have talked to, say fewer tires now have them. I can only conclude that tires are better balanced overall than they used to be.
Yup. Tires are much better than they used to be.. Maybe part of the whole radial tire thing??

Tire changing around the midwest seems pretty pricey, which is why I've changed my own for the last 10+ years.. With the cost of tire mounting, because I do my own, every third to forth tire is free..

I also buy from SWMototire.com, where shipping is free if you buy 2 or more tires at the same time.. Never much of a problem for me. I'm either in need of 2 tires, or I have a buddy in need of one, too.. :wink:
 

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sasquatch said:
Cheff, that looks real interesting! Do you change the tires yourself, then just pour the beads in for balancing? What all is needed to change tubeless tires? I've changed tubed tires before (tractor) but never before on my bike -- my last bike had tubed tires and I took the wheels off and took them to the dealer for install :oops: If I can avoid that scenario in the future, I would consider that a good thing :D
It really works, no kidding here, and no affiliation to any one. Yes I change the tires my self, have been on all my bikes, and my friends bikes for years now.

I change the tires (tube or no tube) then pour the dynabeads in through the valve stem. You do need a filtered valve core so the beads won’t clog it. The tire stays balanced all the time, no matter the wear pattern. That is the best part of this stuff.

Some of the earlier stuff I tried would rust, or clump with moisture, and was way more expensive. This little marbles work great and are comparable to paying for lifetime balancing (which when I did pay for it, I never had it done).

The hardest part of tubless tires is the breaking of the bead and the seating of the bead. But I have never had real trouble with motorcycle tires. One good way to break the bead is to roll the bike while the valve core is out. The weight of the bike will usually break the bead. I have a bead breaker so I only do this while on the road/trail to change a tube. (that is if the flat did not already break the bead while I was riding :) )
 
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Tires!

Mokusbajusz! Your right! Getting tires mounted is a mess here. Im also used to going to any tire dealership in Germany/Austria and buying tires and getting them mounted. It was quite a shock to come to the States and find out nobody does bike tires but bike dealers! And it gets expensive. I sure miss Reifen Tennnert in Erlangen. Bob.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you for the replys. I am not in any need of tire balancing but was curious because I have no weights at all on the rims. Thank you
 
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Balance Marks!

Kurt! Its funny that you dont have any balance marks on your Anakees! Im looking at my new unmounted ones now and found the marks at the edge of the bead. White dots. Ive never seen a set or tire without them. Bob.
 
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Re: Balance Marks!

Euro Rider said:
Kurt! Its funny that you dont have any balance marks on your Anakees! Im looking at my new unmounted ones now and found the marks at the edge of the bead. White dots. Ive never seen a set or tire without them. Bob.
I looked long and hard for a mark, but never found one on the front or rear. The last tires I mounted that had marks were a set of BT020's (other than tubed Pirelli MT21's for a dual sport). The original Trailwings had marks too.
 

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Best to find the heavy spot on you rim and put the dot
by that instead of assuming that the valve stem is the heavy
spot. Use a punch and make a mark on the rim for future use so
you don't have to keep finding it everytime you change a tire.


Some links about tire changing.
http://www.clarity.net/~adam/tire-changing-doc.html

http://www.vfrdiscussion.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=4206
Tire balancer, neat little gadget.

http://www.marcparnes.com/

This is from the FAQ on the site, the RueGlyde is the key to tire changing.

The very first thing we suggest to callers looking for tips is to go down to their local NAPA auto parts store and get a gallon of RuGlyde rubber lubricant. This stuff is magic for removing and installing tires. We put some on a sponge and smear it on the bead when removing and installing the tire. It works wonders! Our second tip, if you're going to be changing tires manually, is to get the 3 piece set of MotionPro tire irons which is their part# 08-0049.
 
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mike183 said:
This is from the FAQ on the site, the RueGlyde is the key to tire changing.

The very first thing we suggest to callers looking for tips is to go down to their local NAPA auto parts store and get a gallon of RuGlyde rubber lubricant.
I buy the Yamaha spray on tire lubricant and it works very well. One $5 can does two or three sets of tires and I don't have that gallon can sitting around in the mean time. Regardless of what you use, they are correct, lubrication makes the difference between breaking a sweat and the tires just slipping right on.
 
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