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I'm new to this forum. I just bought a new wee 650. I love it. I have added about $3000 in extras. List to long to write. What I didn't buy, I made at work. Yes I'm a fabriquator by trade. Welding, Cnc , sheet metal, press brakes, lasers, tube banders, welders, you name it. All for me to play with. Any ways, my question is in reguards to tire balancing. Every one talks about installing their own tires. Buying a tire mounting table at harbor freight. But what about balancing the tires?????? Please help on this topic. I would like to be able to change from on road to off road tires. What is the process? Paying to have it done just doesn't seem right. To much money. Please help. I'm new on the forum, I don't really know my way around. Help and thank you for your time.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I just take mine to the dealer. $25 to mount and balance a tire (if it's off the bike) once or twice a year isn't worth messing with to me.
 

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1---make a static balancer. You just need a frame and a pair of cones on a shaft to center the wheel. You might use a pair of ball bearings on each side so the shaft turns easily.
http://roadstarclinic.com/content/view/83/130/

2---Balance with Dynabeads. Works well for me.
 

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I bought and like this one- http://www.marcparnes.com/Suzuki_Motorcycle_Wheel_Balancer.htm
I set it between two gallon oil jugs, and make sure they are level by unscrewing one of their caps with a level setting on them.
Also you will need a set of tire irons, a set of rim protectors, some stick-on wheel weights, and a bead breaker: http://www.webbikeworld.com/t2/bead-breaker/motorcycle-tire-bead-breaker.htm (I use my back porch, not my vehicle)
Then search for and read every motorcycle tire changing post you can find on the internet till you get a good idea which is easiest or best.
I have three motorcycles, so the cost was quickly paid for- and what else is there to do on rainy days?
I did try Dyna beads on two bikes tires, and they seemed to work. If they can be recovered easily when i change tires, I will stick with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for the info. That helps. So the tires do have to be balanced. $25 doesn't sound like a bad idea.
 

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tire

i replaced a rear tire and didnt do any balanceing . the bike is smooth to top speed . front might be more critical
 

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1---make a static balancer. You just need a frame and a pair of cones on a shaft to center the wheel. You might use a pair of ball bearings on each side so the shaft turns easily.
http://roadstarclinic.com/content/view/83/130/

2---Balance with Dynabeads. Works well for me.
Like PTRider I use a rod with end cones and balance my tires. I do that because I can get the balance closer doing that than they can at the dealership with a computerized balancer. THEN I put in Dynabeads, like putting icing on the cake. I know it's said you don't need to do that, but there is no reason why I can't get the tire as close to balance as I can before I let the Dynabeads do their thing. My bike is smooth and that's all I care about.

PS if you are going to do it that way make sure you get some type of tire repair kit to put under your seat in case you have a flat on the road
 

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I have put on more sets of tires than I can remember. The Harbor Freight tire changing machine is worth the price to break the beads and hold the rim in place while changing. But I still usually "spoon" the tire on. As for balancing, I don't balance my tires. If I see a paint mark on the sidewall I align it with the valve stem. Not sure if that means anything but some stories told indicate that is where the manufacurer wants them mounted. I have never had a vibration, wear issues that are not the same as everyone else. On dirt bike tires I have had vibration, but sometimes the rim locks and construction of tire are the cause. If I did have a vibration after mounting I would be VERY suspicious of a problem with that tire. Your results may vary.....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
dynabeeds

Every body keeps talking about dynabeeds. I don't understand how they work. What are they? What's the process? cost? and so on.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I made a static balancer and it is easy to get the balance with in a couple of grams. I do my friends balancing for free and have had 100% satisfaction so far. It is enjoyable to do this kind of 'purifying' of your bike at home.
 

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Tire Balancing

Just balanced my rear tire on my 09 wee. I liked the OEM trailwings (lasted 13k miles) but decided to try anakee 2 due to their claim of better tread life. The tire required 23 grams to get it in balance. The picture shows not only my balancer but all the tools to change a tire. (6 inch C clamp, spoons, siding, 2 by 4's etc) The material cost for my balancer was under $10 bucks. (the bearings were free from a scrap drive assembly at work) The real cost is in your time and labor. Hope this post helps......

WD

 

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lateral balance

The axle-type balancers will give you radial balance, but not lateral balance. Not that important for a back tire, since it can't move around much. But on a front tire, if the heavy spot is on the left side, and you put the balance weight on the right side, the tire will appear balanced on an axle-type balancer, but the tire will cause a steering shimmy. Most computer balance machines will avoid this issue. As to not balancing tires at all (and not using a balancing medium like DynaBeads or similar) I should relate that, when I bought my old Airhead BMW, the PO had evidently installed the tires without balancing them, and it had a fairly severe rear-end shake at high speeds, which contributed to numb butt when riding for any length of time. When a new tire went on, and I had it balanced by the dealer, no more shake.
 

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With all those toys at your disposal, it should be easy to whip up a simple balancer. I find, with some patience, I can balance to within 1/8 ounce. I use a couple of floor stands to support it at the bearings.



 

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The axle-type balancers will give you radial balance, but not lateral balance. Not that important for a back tire, since it can't move around much. But on a front tire, if the heavy spot is on the left side, and you put the balance weight on the right side, the tire will appear balanced on an axle-type balancer, but the tire will cause a steering shimmy. Most computer balance machines will avoid this issue. As to not balancing tires at all (and not using a balancing medium like DynaBeads or similar) I should relate that, when I bought my old Airhead BMW, the PO had evidently installed the tires without balancing them, and it had a fairly severe rear-end shake at high speeds, which contributed to numb butt when riding for any length of time. When a new tire went on, and I had it balanced by the dealer, no more shake.
Jimding,

Good Point, but most shops that use a computer balancer use CLIP TYPE WEIGHTS that can only be mounted on the rim of the tire. You can never get a true lateral balance with only one weight. The balancer is just choosing one of only two locations. (right or left side of the rim) The tape type weights are trimmed to the ounce and can be placed in the center of the tire/rim axis for the best alignment.

My 09 wee came with no weights on the rear tire. (was it balanced???) I have put over 2,000 additional miles (since my tire change) on my bike and have not has any seat issues. I now have no complaints about the stock seat. It's like killing two birds with one stone. Best no cost FARKEL to date.

WD
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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First, read THIS because this topic is already being talked about just a few threads up from here.

Second, if you want to balance your tires the "traditional" way, you don't need any fancy equipment. Everything you need is right there. Slide the axle through the wheel hub and suspend the assembly between two buckets, two blocks of wood, two chairs; whatever you have that can lift the axle and wheel assembly off of the ground. Then, spin the tire. It only takes a little shove to determine what weight you will need.

Personally, I don't balance my tires anymore.

In real life, the wheel assembly is spinning around the axle, so just use that.

But, please follow my link to read more in the other thread that is going on.

B.
 

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+1 for Dynabeads. I've been running them for about 4000 miles and have had ZERO issues with them. whether you're cruising at 65 or at redline, never felt any out-of-balance issues.:hurray:
 
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