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Discussion Starter #1
I have new tires on the way and since they aren't what came on the bike, should I use the recommended air pressure?

I'm putting Bridgestone T30's on this time.
 

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The recommended pressure sticker on the swing arm is a good starting point. I find that I like the pressure a little higher (+2 or +3 psi) with my tires and mainly asphalt riding.
 

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Scrubby, you ask a very interesting question. Pls let us know what the sticker on your swing arm calls for.

My '07 wee showed 33F/36R solo and 33/41 2-up. I think in 2009 the DOT stopped manufacturers from listing different pressure for different loads. The sticker had to show only the presure required to carry the max load, 'cuz too many consumers don't deal well with conditionals. My '14 Vee2 shows 36/41 for all conditions. I'm running 36/39 (solo) and really like how it handles. Nothing wrong with higher pressures, but maybe they aren't optimal. Among other things, tires need to be normally warm for best traction. Tires warm mainly by flexing, and flexing is controlled by both load and the air pressure. A bit less pressure in cold weather and a bit more in hot weather has some things to recommend it. Some people will say that the pressure on the side wall is the required pressure (not true), and some will say that this max pressure gives better tire life. Maybe, but at the cost of perhaps less traction and a harsher ride.

So...start with the swingarm sticker pressure, but be open to some reasonable experimentation.

How well does my Vee2 handle at 36/39? Yesterday I was riding a fun road (Washington's SR-112) which has some Slow To 15 and Slow to 20 curves. Once I set the radius in the curves, I could have let go of the grips and the bike held its radius around the curve. Your bike weighs a little less, so a bit lower pressures will work well for you. My favorite NoCal road?...US-199 is a good one.

And, let us know how you like the T30s.
 

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PT is right. Tire pressure can vary quite a bit depending on what you are doing and the temperature, too. For race track riding, like a track day, you actually reduce the pressure to around 30 on the front and 32 on the rear. When the tires warm up, they really stick. But never do that with a heavy load on a long trip. The tires will overheat. In the dirt, some riders only use mid-20s or perhaps lower in their tires to increase traction. (at the risk of bending a rim) So try the recommended and experiment from there. The 20s are NOT recommended for the street. Potholes and such can ruin a tire and rim in one bump. I usually run about 34-38. I'm using battle wings, I think. Not typical Adventure bike tires. Street tires.
 

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I can't vouch for the info but a long distance BMW shop owner told me he puts 48-50 pounds in the tires when he does his 4 corners, iron butt things. Says he gets the best tire life that way.
That's the extreme I guess. I've run 36/40 in all my radial tired bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Scrubby, you ask a very interesting question. Pls let us know what the sticker on your swing arm calls for.

My '07 wee showed 33F/36R solo and 33/41 2-up. I think in 2009 the DOT stopped manufacturers from listing different pressure for different loads. The sticker had to show only the presure required to carry the max load, 'cuz too many consumers don't deal well with conditionals. My '14 Vee2 shows 36/41 for all conditions. I'm running 36/39 (solo) and really like how it handles. Nothing wrong with higher pressures, but maybe they aren't optimal. Among other things, tires need to be normally warm for best traction. Tires warm mainly by flexing, and flexing is controlled by both load and the air pressure. A bit less pressure in cold weather and a bit more in hot weather has some things to recommend it. Some people will say that the pressure on the side wall is the required pressure (not true), and some will say that this max pressure gives better tire life. Maybe, but at the cost of perhaps less traction and a harsher ride.

So...start with the swingarm sticker pressure, but be open to some reasonable experimentation.

How well does my Vee2 handle at 36/39? Yesterday I was riding a fun road (Washington's SR-112) which has some Slow To 15 and Slow to 20 curves. Once I set the radius in the curves, I could have let go of the grips and the bike held its radius around the curve. Your bike weighs a little less, so a bit lower pressures will work well for you. My favorite NoCal road?...US-199 is a good one.

And, let us know how you like the T30s.
Mine is a 2011 Wee and the sticker says 33/36 and I can't remember the 2 up.
I had some issues with the stock TW's on a couple of the roads I like, the bike felt squirrley, so I went up to 36/39 and it felt good again. I have 36/36 right now, still TW's and it feels good too, considering they're done.
 

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Also 2011 Wee. Yes, 33/36 and 41 with two. I've always done 2 more than recommended and check every time I ride. Do 2 more on cars also and check monthly--if lose 1 or 2 it won't be below recommendation.
 

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+2 isn't a bad idea, and we never know how accurate the tire pressure gauge is. I gathered all my gauges, maybe a half dozen, checked on the same tire, 5 were within 1 or 2 psi of each other, so they were probably OK, one was way off and went into the trash.
 
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