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Don't recall seeing a thread like this, or if there has been, it's been a while. So figured I'd get things started.

With the wealth of knowledge and experience (ie, old farts like me) on this site, we've all learned handy tips and tidbits through the years that are worth passing along. Whether it be bike maintenance, gear, setup, or whatever really, lets see if we can all learn something new.

I'll get things started:

1- When it's time to wash the helmet liner, use the same hair shampoo that you use in the shower, Head & Shoulders, Pert, etc. This helps prevent head itch which can be caused by the harsh detergents in laundry soap.

2 - In the winter, spray your bare feet with aerosol anti perspirant such as Right Guard, before putting on socks. Helps keep your feet from sweating which in turn keeps them from getting cold.

3- Hair spray works great for installing new grips. Works as a lubricant during installation, and once dry, it acts as an adhesive. Through the years I've rarely ever had to use grip glue, even on dirt bikes.

4- Before mounting up new tires, put them out in the sun for a couple hours to soften the rubber. Or in the winter, bring them inside the house overnight. Makes the job much easier.

5- OK, this one requires some background info. Through the years I've gotten to be good internet friends with a certain RTW ADV rider from England whose widely known over on the ADV Rider website. So before you slam me with "WTF man" comments, just know that this bit-o-info was not my idea. It came from him. But I will admit I have used it, and it freakin works great.....

Ok, here we go. When we go on long extended trips on a motorcycle we're limited to packing only the bare minimum in regards to clothing. The gear on our bodies is most of it, along with a pair of shorts or pants for dinner and a couple extra pairs of socks and skivvies. Lots of guys like the new type of synthetic or nylon underwear as it's cool, wicks sweat, can be washed out in the sink, and will be dry come morning. However, I prefer to wear tight nylon bike shorts under my textile pants and no skivvies, so no seams to get uncomfortable. And they also wick sweat as well as provide support for Mr Happy and the Twins. However, they do not dry quick when washed so laundry is an issue, and when on the bike for multiple days, there's not room to bring along 10 pairs (not to mention expensive).

Not sure how to stay politically correct describing this, so I'll just jump right in. As was told to me, line the crotch of your bike shorts with women's thin style pads, AKA, "panty liners". They work great at keeping your bike shorts fresh and clean. And at the end of the day, replace as necessary, and you're good for another day......... I know, I know, it just don't sound right and it's damn hard to convince yourself to give it a try, but go ahead, steal some from the old lady's bathroom next time you take a multi-day trip. I do, and I've worn the same bike shorts for a week straight doing this......

I'm comfortable in my manliness, so let the bashing begin!!!!
 

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I'm comfortable in my manliness, so let the bashing begin!!!![/QUOTE]

You being comfortable in your manliness really takes the fun out of bashing...:frown:

Pretty good tips though.
 

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Ok, here we go. When we go on long extended trips on a motorcycle we're limited to packing only the bare minimum in regards to clothing. The gear on our bodies is most of it, along with a pair of shorts or pants for dinner and a couple extra pairs of socks and skivvies. Lots of guys like the new type of synthetic or nylon underwear as it's cool, wicks sweat, can be washed out in the sink, and will be dry come morning. However, I prefer to wear tight nylon bike shorts under my textile pants and no skivvies, so no seams to get uncomfortable. And they also wick sweat as well as provide support for Mr Happy and the Twins. However, they do not dry quick when washed so laundry is an issue, and when on the bike for multiple days, there's not room to bring along 10 pairs (not to mention expensive).

Not sure how to stay politically correct describing this, so I'll just jump right in. As was told to me, line the crotch of your bike shorts with women's thin style pads, AKA, "panty liners". They work great at keeping your bike shorts fresh and clean. And at the end of the day, replace as necessary, and you're good for another day......... I know, I know, it just don't sound right and it's damn hard to convince yourself to give it a try, but go ahead, steal some from the old lady's bathroom next time you take a multi-day trip. I do, and I've worn the same bike shorts for a week straight doing this......

I'm comfortable in my manliness, so let the bashing begin!!!!
Once upon a time I would use a pad inside my football helmet to keep sweat out of my eyes buy that just seems... wrong.

On a similar note though, I stick with underarmour. I was skeptical initially when they were issued to me the first time 10 years ago, but it wasn't long before I was sold. They're light, pack extremely well and they are great for wicking sweat and staying dry.

As far as the pantyliners, in that kind of situation I'll stick with a quick baby wipe "bath", and a fresh dry pair of underarmor. I can always rinse out the sweaty pair somewhere and they'll dry quickly. :D
 

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All good tips, I think. I make it a little simpler for long rides, though, as I have several pairs of old bicycling shorts around. If I am going long and planning to spend all day on either motorcycle, I wear them under my regular clothes, the padded chamois crotch and no seams avoids a lot of the crotch discomfort.
 

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Ok, here we go. When we go on long extended trips on a motorcycle we're limited to packing only the bare minimum in regards to clothing. The gear on our bodies is most of it, along with a pair of shorts or pants for dinner and a couple extra pairs of socks and skivvies. Lots of guys like the new type of synthetic or nylon underwear as it's cool, wicks sweat, can be washed out in the sink, and will be dry come morning. However, I prefer to wear tight nylon bike shorts under my textile pants and no skivvies, so no seams to get uncomfortable. And they also wick sweat as well as provide support for Mr Happy and the Twins. However, they do not dry quick when washed so laundry is an issue, and when on the bike for multiple days, there's not room to bring along 10 pairs (not to mention expensive).

Not sure how to stay politically correct describing this, so I'll just jump right in. As was told to me, line the crotch of your bike shorts with women's thin style pads, AKA, "panty liners". They work great at keeping your bike shorts fresh and clean. And at the end of the day, replace as necessary, and you're good for another day......... I know, I know, it just don't sound right and it's damn hard to convince yourself to give it a try, but go ahead, steal some from the old lady's bathroom next time you take a multi-day trip. I do, and I've worn the same bike shorts for a week straight doing this......
Anybody else got anything worth sharing?
I think that you have already shared way too much!! :green_lol::green_lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Here's another

Here's another one.

Rather than dropping $100 - $200 on a thermarest pad, I use a rectangular inflatable pool float. I didn't go the cheap $5 route from the dollar store, instead I got mine from a pool supply store for $20 and it's made of much thicker suede type vinyl. And its elevated at the head so I have a built-in pillow. As an added bonus my 12V DC Slime tire pump handles inflation in about 3 minutes. But the big kicker for me is that it packs down ultra small, way smaller than any thermarest, to about the size of a tennis shoe and weighs only about 6 ounces.....
 

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Good thread, I'm sure people will add bits as they think of them. :thumbup:

Put your wallet and mobile phone in ziplock sandwich bags to keep them dry on rainy days [even if you have a "waterproof" jacket sometimes the pockets get damp/wet].

A strip of duct tape or electrical tape across the BOTTOM of your visor will act as a sun shield/peak when the visor is open on a sunny day.

Having a small pack of wet wipes under the seat or in your luggage is handy for cleaning your hands/helmet visor/backside. :jawdrop:

A bootlace or other piece of string is handy for tying the front brake lever before you pick the bike back up off the ground :yikes: stops the bike rolling if you are on a bit of a slope [don't forget to deploy the sidestand before picking it up if the bike is lying on its right hand side- saves picking it up twice :fineprint: ].
 

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Long ride coming up
Baby powder or talcum on your junk

Car Before winter use Silicone Spray wipe onto your rubber door gaskets , they won't freeze together.

Remove the old tire use a lube spray like wd40 to help it slip off the rim. Clean it off before new tire, but its worth it.
 

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On longer trips ALL my underclothing -- shirts, shorts and socks -- is of the quick-wash-and-dry polypropylene variety. Three of each is sufficient and provides a margin if you can't do the washing for a day or so.

And I like diluted liquid soap for tire removal/installation. Easy to rinse off, and cleans the rim as well for better bead seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Good stuff

A bootlace or other piece of string is handy for tying the front brake lever before you pick the bike back up off the ground :yikes: stops the bike rolling if you are on a bit of a slope [don't forget to deploy the sidestand before picking it up if the bike is lying on its right hand side- saves picking it up twice :fineprint: ].
Great one and absolutely makes sense. Good stuff!

And as Rich suggested, I too like WD-40 for doing tires. Works really well.
 

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Wd40

A small bottle of WD40 is a staple in my on-bike tool kit. Also works great for spraying down the bike before a mud ride. Coated all surfaces of my Wee (aside from seat and controls, for obvious reasons) before I rode the haul road to Deadhorse a couple years back and made getting the calcium chloride off much easier afterwards. And if you want to be more environmentally friendly, Pam cooking spray will also work.....
 

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Here's one of a different nature. When camping out at the motel, ask the clerk at the front desk if they have any terrycloth rags/old towels that you can use for cleaning your windshield. They almost always do and are happy to give you some so you don't use the good towels from the room. At one motel we stayed at this summer, the lady there was so happy we asked that she gave us a handful of old towels and a 2-gallon bucket of hot water. Makes for good PR.
 

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Women's Wear Daily

Don't forget the panty hose. Under your other appropriate clothing, they really do help to keep you warm, but don't seem to contribute much to overheating when temps swing the other way. I've used them for hunting and other cold/foul weather sports activities since Joe Willie Namath wore them in the '68 Super Bowl and admitted it. Panty hose also work well under wet suits when diving or on a watertoy. The problem with panty hose comes when you take them off and the hair on your legs and butt objects to having been turned backwards for a while.
 

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Don't forget the panty hose. Under your other appropriate clothing, they really do help to keep you warm, but don't seem to contribute much to overheating when temps swing the other way. I've used them for hunting and other cold/foul weather sports activities since Joe Willie Namath wore them in the '68 Super Bowl and admitted it. Panty hose also work well under wet suits when diving or on a watertoy. The problem with panty hose comes when you take them off and the hair on your legs and butt objects to having been turned backwards for a while.
Or black lycra/spandex cyclists' tights. Requires only slightly less self confidence. :)

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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-Tilley Travel Dress Socks are wonderful for riding and everyday use! They dry overnight when hand washed, last forever, are very comfortable i nalmsot any condition. I have used them at 126 degrees F in Death Valley and commuting in below-freezing temperatures. They are my only normal socks. (Thanks Greywolf for pointing this out to me years ago!)

-I keep a couple of microfibre cloths in my topcase. One is in a largish freezer bag and is wet. The other is dry. These are great for cleaning bugs off faceshields while on the road. Lately I also keep a microfibre cloth in my tankbag so I can use it while riding if needs be.

-Keep a pen or pencil in your top case with some duct tape wrapped around it. Duct tape is always useful but you don't usually need a full roll.

-a small electirc air pump and a string type patch kit will fit under the seat of your bike. If you don't have (or want) a cigarette lighter socket then get a aligator clips to cigarette lighter adaptpter or add clips to the wires of the pump.

..Tom
 

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When riding in rain, especially heavy rain, tuck your gloves inside your jacket sleeves to keep your hands dry. Experience has taught me that I get very little to no moisture up my sleeves than I do seepage down into my gloves ( when they are tucked in ). Also, when it's hot don't cinch down your cuffs....allow some airflow up your sleeves.

Wicking skivvies ( no cotton content ), it's the only type I own, I wear them everyday. Long sleeve wicking shirts work great too. Lightweight in the Summer and medium or heavyweight in the Winter. I also wear wicking socks when riding.

On long trips keep some NSAIDs ( anti-inflamatory ) handy. I use to take them before and after a long ride, but now I just take them when I feel the need.

Also, one that we all know, but I tend to forget too often. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. You'll last much longer...
 

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From a hygiene stand point , I always carry two items on long road trips , that have totally been worth the ridicule. 1. Baby wipes (good for more than just your smelly butt). 2. Anti-fungal spray. After a shower house gives you a good case of Athletes foot , you won't go without. Both pack down so small , you won't miss the space they use.
 

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Helmet Shield Cleaning

Tiny Spray Bottle sold at Walmart in optical dept.

Microfiber cloth, bug windshield wash, 3m liquid compounding. also Walmart

Daily cleaning on a ride with spray and microfiber
and periodic rub out with 3m with microfiber will actually

IMPROVE the face shield clarity. I have been a happy Shoei shield for 3 years as before 1 a year
 
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