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Do you people carry around a torque wrench with you?
 

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Tighten it up till it strips and back it off a hair. I do mine by feel. Never had a issue. Except when I was 12 on my 1968 Honda 90. It generally helps if you tighten up the axle nut when you adjust chain. It is hell finding all the Cush drive rubbers in a field:furious:.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Do you people carry around a torque wrench with you?
No. I changed a rear tire on the road once. It isn't a delicate part but it's a good idea to coat the threads with anti seize to prevent galling. Unless you do a lot of water crossings, enough will remain on the threads to prevent galling after removal and replacement. With a torque wrench and anti seize, it still takes 58lb-ft. to put on the nut. A mildly educated arm will get you in the ball park. The nut's locking mechanism will keep it from coming off. With the tool kit tools, it will be hard to over torque the nut with your arm. You might have use a foot on the tool with the extension included to break the nut free.
 

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Do you people carry around a torque wrench with you?
I do. A 3/8 and a 1/2 in, but only on long trips like my trip across Canada last year. For shorter trips, where I have to take off the rear wheel, I simply mark (scratch) the nut prior to removal & put it in the same position on reassembly. Not perfect but it works.

I don't use anti seize as i figure enough axle grease got onto the threaded part to protect it.

Brian
 

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I carry a 22mm and a 24mm socket with a 1/2 inch breaker bar just for that axle nut. I've found most stock tool kits to be inadequate to work on the bike. I add my own tools as needed.
 

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I am a torque wrench fanatic at home in the comfort of my shop. On the road, I do not take them due to weight and space. If concerned you can always make your repair on the roadway, then stop at a Autozone or a motorcycle shop, introduce yourself and your issue and ask to borrow a torque wrench.

Carrying 20 pounds of tools to remove an engine with seems counter productive for a bike that is already pretty heavy.
 

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IMO, and I'm sure I'll catch all kinds of Hell here for saying this, people are too anal about this kinda crap. Guess I'm old school, but in my 40 years of riding and working on bikes (and cars) I've never used a torque wrench on anything besides internal engine parts. As Grey mentioned, after you've tightened about a million nuts over the course of a lifetime, you tend to develop a feel for how tight it should be. And no, not since I was a kid have I stripped a nut and I've never had anything come loose or fall off... Well aside from my license plate bolts this past weekend, lol. So if you're worried about carrying a freaking torque wrench on a bike trip, just leave it at home, exercise common sense, and you'll be fine. You have a cotter pin on the nut so it's not gonna come off......
 

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I never use a torque wrench on my bikes. I bet more people have stripped threads using a torque wrench than those that go by feel, particularly since some of the torques listed in the shop manual are wrong. It does not take much wrenching experience and only a little common sense to develop a sense of feel for the nuts/bolts on a piece of machinery.
 

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IMO, and I'm sure I'll catch all kinds of Hell here for saying this, people are too anal about this kinda crap. Guess I'm old school, but in my 40 years of riding and working on bikes (and cars) I've never used a torque wrench on anything besides internal engine parts. As Grey mentioned, after you've tightened about a million nuts over the course of a lifetime, you tend to develop a feel for how tight it should be. And no, not since I was a kid have I stripped a nut and I've never had anything come loose or fall off... Well aside from my license plate bolts this past weekend, lol. So if you're worried about carrying a freaking torque wrench on a bike trip, just leave it at home, exercise common sense, and you'll be fine. You have a cotter pin on the nut so it's not gonna come off......
I never use a torque wrench on my bikes. I bet more people have stripped threads using a torque wrench than those that go by feel, particularly since some of the torques listed in the shop manual are wrong. It does not take much wrenching experience and only a little common sense to develop a sense of feel for the nuts/bolts on a piece of machinery.
+1 to both of ya. :) Torque wrenches cause far more stripped threads than they prevent.
 

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I use a torque wrench on the odd bolt when at home but would never consider taking one on a trip. Why bother? The basic stuff you need is in the tool kit and you should be able to get things close enough. If you thought it was critical go to a shop and ask to either use someone's torque wrench or have them trorque it.

..Tom
 

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Yay for the guys who don't use a torque wrench. :mrgreen:
I figure on not having a problem in a trip of only a few thousand miles. It's why we do regular maintenance.
 

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Long trips I'm taking along a 1/2" ratchet, the socket for the rear axle as well as the allen-socket tool for the front axle, this thing..



Under the seat in a pouch I stuff right in front of the tail light I always have a 3/8" ratchet with 8-16mm sockets, a set of L-shaped Allen keys, spare fuses, some zipties, small roll of electrical tape, valve core tool and tire plugging tools.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Mechanic's feel.
I get the impression some people think of the proper torque as a point, maybe because that's how manuals are written. It's actually a range. The simplified version is a fastener that is tight enough to hold things together without loosening yet loose enough not to cause damage is in the range. In some situations, that range is pretty small. Those situations are the ones where it pays to own a torque wrench.

The bolts that attached the drive shaft to the engine on my old BMW R90S are a good example. The range was so narrow, new bolts were required each time they were replaced so the bolt stretch was just right. It's stretch that keeps a bolt in place. Small bolts that connect to shallow holes in aluminum may be in the smallest range category on V-Stroms.
 

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You anti torque wrench guys crack me up. Its like the wrench is possessed and out to destroy your bike. Its a calibrated ratchet. If it doesn't feel right (mechanics feel as you call it just stop).

Good mechanics use torque wrenchs, not gut feel when its important.
Doctors use scalpels, not kitchen knives...for the same reason.

If you have bothered to pay attention even decent tire shops use wiggle stick extensions to gauge wheel lug torque on tire installs. I will not let a shop mount tires on my vehicles with out them. I have had them strip or snap lugs by "mechanics feel" and worse, warp brake discs due to uneven torque. Do I carry a Twrench to change a flat...nope. But I do recheck the torque with a wrench when home.

I suspect most who are against the practice are too cheap to invest a couple hundred dollars in quality tools.

To follow up on GW post...torque is an indirect measure of bolt tension, nothing more, nothing less. Metals have two strengths...elastic - where when released from stress the bolt returns to its original length (thing rubber band) and plastic - where the bolt gets a permanent stretch and is longer than before (think chewing gum). Threads have the same two values. Torque wrenches and torque values exist to make sure the fastener is not tightened past the elastic range plus a margin of error. Therefore you do not subject the bolt to tensions that cause it to permanently stretch. Too loose and it just falls off or allows a part to slip if a shear force is involved.
 

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yikes... i've never checked mine... I road all of last year without ever checking it... Is this something I should be doing on a regular basis? i do have a torque wrench.
 

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You anti torque wrench guys crack me up. Its like the wrench is possessed and out to destroy your bike. Its a calibrated ratchet. If it doesn't feel right (mechanics feel as you call it just stop).
I'm not against proper torque, but out of the three torque wrenches I do own, I trust only one of them to not break bolts or strip threads. None of them were cheap bargain basement wrenches.

I never broke bolts in the 50 years before I bought the torque wrenches and I bought them specifically to work on the bike when I got back into riding in 2003.
 

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You anti torque wrench guys crack me up. Its like the wrench is possessed and out to destroy your bike. Its a calibrated ratchet. If it doesn't feel right (mechanics feel as you call it just stop).


To follow up on GW post...torque is an indirect measure of bolt tension, nothing more, nothing less. Metals have two strengths...elastic - where when released from stress the bolt returns to its original length (thing rubber band) and plastic - where the bolt gets a permanent stretch and is longer than before (think chewing gum). Threads have the same two values. Torque wrenches and torque values exist to make sure the fastener is not tightened past the elastic range plus a margin of error. Therefore you do not subject the bolt to tensions that cause it to permanently stretch. Too loose and it just falls off or allows a part to slip if a shear force is involved.
In addition there's also tensile strength. Easily calculated without a torque wrench. Tighten until the bolt breaks, then back off a quarter turn.
 
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