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Came home today on a mission to get TBS and TPS adjusted again I'm at 35k on my 02 bought in late 03. Rode the snot out of it down in Dragon country this month. I was playing with the linkage and watching the plates open and close, secondaries removed and it seems the plates don't spring back shut like they should I was going to spray carb cleaner on the springs and in the throttle bodies to see if that got rid of the problem but wondered if and body had seen this before.

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Cables,

Typically, the cables will start to fray and hang up. You should be able to see whether this is the case by watching the cables/throttle mechanism as you open and close the throttles.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Lube it

Took the cables off tonight from the right hand grip lubed cables with Honda multi purpose lube and a zip lock bag zip tied around the cables. I also lubed the housing where the cables go into and the handlebar under the throttle grip. Worked great make sure to check up on this forgotten maintenance item.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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It's normally not a good idea to lube V-Strom cables. They are teflon lined and shouldn't need it. Lube can even soften the teflon and muck things up. It will attract dust and cause problems. I've got to wonder if the cables had been lubed before and that as the source of the problem. The manual says to grease the pivot ends but does not say to lube the cables. The WD40 could have cleaned things out and evaporated away and might have been a better choice.
 

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Teflon cables and lube???

I read your take on lube and modern cables. I also called both my Honda (st1300) and Suzuki (650 strom) dealers and asked the question. These dealers are large modernized shops with certified tecs that I have years of experience with. Both of them say they lube cables all the time with no limit on the type or year of bike. They have not experienced issues with the Teflon coating breaking down or swelling. Is there anything in writing from any bike mfg. about this issue??

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The service manual contains no instructions to ever lube the cables. It isn't in the periodic maintenance chart or the body of cable installation or maintenance. Greasing the pivots is all that is covered. These pages are full of things dealers do and shouldn't or don't do and should. Follow the Suzuki manual.

The years of experience can cause a problem. Lubing goes back to before teflon cables became common and mechanics tend to do things the way they've always done them. Teflon breaking down or swelling would be uncommon. You never know what solvent is in some lube carriers though. The big problem is stickiness. Most cable lubes are designed to be sticky after the solvent evaporates so they stay in place. That attracts dust that causes wear and increased friction as the slick surfaces are abraded. A lube that is more of a flush that evaporates like WD40 probably won't cause any harm but it won't help either unless sticky lube has already gotten into the cable.
 

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All good points. I did notice that the "comes with the bike" manual doesn't specify lube for the cables and that document is usually written for the "new buyer" or first time rider. Maybe with any luck cable lube is a thing of the past...like drum brakes. Now I just have to figure out if the PJ1 that I shot into the clutch cable last month is a ticking time bomb that will go off on my 2000 mile Nova Scotia trip next month.

Thanks,
JP
 
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