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Yes I know safety checks are on me. However, this is something that could be easily prevented by just putting on a drop of threadlock at the factory (as well as spec for service technicians)
1) Front ABS sensor mounting bolt vibrated out and the sensor was found dangling by its wire after braking got weird and herky jerky.
2) Front left brake caliper mounting bolt vibrated out and the caliper rotated off the brake disk with the remaining bolt as the axis. Discovered this as I lost front braking doing 80mph on the way to work. Scared the crap out of me. I feel truly alive now.
 

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Then again one reads of horror stories about fasteners that won't come loose. Personally, I don't like thread locker fluids. A nice little washer will work well as will proper tension applied at installation.
Only bolts I've had come loose are the ones I sloppily didn't tighten properly. I gotten get me a better mechanic!
 

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On the other hand, the front fender bolt that goes into the captured nut in the plastic fender should never have been thread locked. That was a mistake.
 

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If you use any thread locker on any screw that goes through plastic, use sparingly and let it dry a few minutes before putting it through the plastic.... threadlocker eats plastic.
 

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Most common thread lockers do not dry- so waiting a few minutes does nothing. They are anaerobic- only cure, rather than dry, in an air free environment.
Most even require metal to be present- IOW threadlocker on a nylon screw threaded into plastic will never cure for most of them.

If threadlocker eats plastic- how does it stay contained in a plastic bottle or tube?>:)
 

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There was a thread here a while back on what kind of plastic some parts were made of. A spec sheet on the plastic indicated some agents that caused it to get brittle and crack and it included thread locker ingredients. There have been a number of threads about cracked plastics caused by thread locker contact. The tube is made of a different type of plastic. I'll second the warning. Keep thread locker off plastic parts. Even a small amount of contact causes deterioration over a wide expanse.
 

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Cyanoacrylate is used to threadlock plastic substrates, such as Loctite 425. You would not want to use an anaerobic type, such as 242, which contains polyglycol dimethacrylate.

You can just use superglue for plastic substrates, but it has a higher strength than Loctite 425 so you have to be careful to just use a tiny dab.
 

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There have been a number of threads about cracked plastics caused by thread locker contact. The tube is made of a different type of plastic.
Interesting- I've used a lot of Loctite over the years but have never tried to use it on plastic and apparently never got any on plastic accidently...as I've never observed that.
So some plastics have an aversion to it but some don't.
My favorite is the blue LocTite gel in the push up tube. Much easier to use and never leaks in your toolbox.

I remember back when Timex came out with one of their first digital watches and it was plastic. I had one and I inadvertently splashed some solvent (IIRC acetone) on it and it crumbled into little pieces right before my eyes, didn't melt, crumbled. Weird.
 

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Here is a reference that discusses some bolting strategies. I think there are several more if you go looking.

Bolt Science Web Site

Tests were done (video) that demonstrate you are better off without a lock washer than with one.

There's lots of good info but I recall there was more some years ago.

The conclusion I read previously suggested to do away with lock washers and use either Nyloc nuts or a chemical fastener (Loctite)
 

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Don't forget the two bolts that hold the front headlight/fairing mount on the Wee (and probably the Vee) frame. Many have vibrated out.
 

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Also, don't over do it using loctite on steel bolts going in to aluminum threads. Had to replace the entire throttle body on my Ford truck because of it.
 

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I'm not a chemist, but I'll try to clarify my post based on my experience from a lot of wrenching bikes. The liquid types do seem to have a carrier solvent that will dry off (albeit slowly), and the applicator tip will plug up if you leave the lid off. You hardly ever need to use more than one drop, which will flash off a lot faster than 3 drops. In the OEM auto biz we had many fasteners pre-coated with Loctite patches, which were yellow, blue, orange, or red. Likely a different formula than what we buy off the shelf, but they had dried similar to a dried soap. Anyway, I'm mostly referring to the blue liquid type I think most of us use.

IMHO you have to evaluate the need for Loctite for each joint, e.g., anywhere there is a rubber grommet/washer, which perhaps has a shoulder on the screw that bottoms out, you likely don't have to use it unless it is chronically vibrating loose. Then, use sparingly so no excess gets on fairing/fender plastics (which could be ABS, PPE) as it will eat those. I've never used Loctite on any plastic screw or threaded nut.

I do use it on critical or safety fasteners like caliper bolts, pinch bolts, brake rotor bolts, etc., and treat it like a lubricated fastener when torquing. A bi-metal galvanic reaction will occur with aluminum to varying degrees depending if it is steel, stainless, galvanized, copper. If you remove/replace the fastener often enough, not so bad. If it's an engine mount bolt that you rarely if ever remove, then use some anti-seize on the threads. Galvanized into aluminum is the worst and reacts in the shortest time. Always use an impact driver to remove stubborn ones of any type.
So, use sparingly, and you'll have to decide in individual fastening cases to use thread locker, anti-seize or nothing.
 

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Aside from those particular fasteners the factory states should have a drop of Loctite, I don't use the stuff. I just go over the bike front to back, top to bottom when I bring it home and make sure the smaller fasteners are snugged down (bodywork, engine case covers, etc) and the rest I check with a torque wrench. No issues with things falling off or coming apart in the 4 years since I purchased it.
 
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