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Long story short, I am a dumb rookie mechanic to my own vstrom. I threaded my rear axle because I over torqued the nut taking off the wheel and it was a pain in the ass to get off and now I'm afraid to put it back on because the axle threads seems broken. See picture attached. Are my options to buy a new axle or to fix the threads on the axle?

Many thanks
 

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Looks like you suffered from thread galling....occurs because of the dissimilar metals used. It is a common enough issue that the legendary Greywolf advised anti-seize be applied and torque setting reduced to 58 lb ft to compensate for lubricity--before this happens. Unfortunately, you did not get the memo in time.

Replacement is warranted and if you do a quick search on this, you'll find lots of stories and recommendations. Hope this helps.
 

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It is called galling. You can find all about it here with a search on axle torque and galling. I would say new axle and nut. I used never seize the first time I disassembled the rear and under torqued. That is what I did but could not recommend to anyone taking any action other than the manufacturers recommended corrective procedure. kfh000
 

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Hmm.. just torque'd mine down to 72.5 this past weekend. Is the recommendation to use 58 and use red thread locker? Do you have a link to GW's post?
 

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No, anti-seize and 58 foot pounds.
Ahh, thank you for clarifying! I bought red locker with the intent of putting that on.

There's no concern of adding some lubricity to the axle threads from the anti-seize? I have nickel and copper based AS. Any preference?

I suppose I could just re-torque periodically to give me the warm and fuzzy if I'm concerned about the torque setting.

I'm going to redo that tonight. I would hate to run into this scenario.
 

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Ahh, thank you for clarifying! I bought red locker with the intent of putting that on.

There's no concern of adding some lubricity to the axle threads from the anti-seize? I have nickel and copper based AS. Any preference?

I suppose I could just re-torque periodically to give me the warm and fuzzy if I'm concerned about the torque setting.

I'm going to redo that tonight. I would hate to run into this scenario.
That is why the lower torque is used, because of the lubricity and the anti-sieze stops the galling. I have been doing it that way for a couple years, axle has not come loose. I have the silver stuff, I think the copper is for higher temps and should work fine.
 

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Have always wondered if this happens more when bike is warm and axle is expanded form heat from riding...stone cold question. :nerd::confused:
 

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Thanks for the info guys. I ended up managing to get bolt back on and off and on again. I bought a torque wrench and anti seize. 58lbs it is!
 

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Ahh, thank you for clarifying! I bought red locker with the intent of putting that on.

There's no concern of adding some lubricity to the axle threads from the anti-seize? I have nickel and copper based AS. Any preference?

I suppose I could just re-torque periodically to give me the warm and fuzzy if I'm concerned about the torque setting.

I'm going to redo that tonight. I would hate to run into this scenario.
Done it for years on 3 different Stroms, nut never budges and my axles never gall. :wink2:
 

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Ive never had an axle galling issue caused by corrosion. The ones Ive had issues with were waaay over torqued by the ALLEGED mechanic that "serviced" the axle last. #4 on the ol' Ingersoll Rand 460 air impact wrench trigger just dont cut it.
Over torqued, the axle threads stretch to the point where there is simple less thread engagement between the 2. The axle threads are stretched and pulled The nut typically unscrews about 1/4-3/4 turn-then locks up as the threads interfere with each other. Keep going, then youre DONE.
If I run into that situation( and I have more than a few times), I cut a groove in the nut almost down to the axle threads, then use a chisel in the threads to expand the nut and remove it. I use a metric axle die or thread-chaser to attempt to restore the axle threads. If there is any doubt whatsoever, I'll replace the axle and in any case, the nut. If I'm stuck with the old axle, I'll torque the nut to 10% over spec, and if the torque wrench clicks off, I'll back it off and retorque to spec.
Like oil pan drain bolts, remove and over-tighten it enough times, the wear will decrease the thread engagement and something will strip.
 

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Well galling of stainless steel surfaces being under high pressure is not corrosion but friction welding. Most common for the castellated nut because they have a small thread contact surface area. That together with high torque is the kiss of death. I am a cheapskate but if there were any signs of galling on the axle I would buy a new one. It's kind of an important part ;-)

The newer models have gotten rid of the castellated nut, so if you need a replacement nut get one of those! I changed mine out as a precaution and had never a problem with my WEE. Always used anti-seize, as per Greywolf.
 

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The root problem is that the spec'd torque is too high. No need for 72ft-lbs on the axle, 50-ish is fine. Not the only place the spec'd torque is wrong, the sprocket bolts also have too high a value in the manual. 25 or so is good for them.

Developing a little feel for what's going on at the thread interface is worth a bunch, and yields (that's a funny y'all :)) better results than blindly relying on a torque wrench.

If you hang out on motorcycle forums a while, you'll realize that most posts about stripped threads involve a torque wrench. That's not a coincidence.
 

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And some people have NO feel for torque, do not know the proper use of a torque wrench, and have never had theirs checked for calibration.
I torque mine tio spec with calibrated Snap-on torque wrenches, not Horror-Freight specials that Ive personally witnessed being 20-30% off on torque wrench calibration testers.
Ive never stripped a fastener or galled threads using a torque wrench, including the axle on my '81 Honda CB750K I bought new and still own.
The last bike with galled rear axle threads was an '05 Yamaha R1, and I had torqued the original nut and axle to spec. When it came to me later for a chain and sprockets, the nut was galled, the axle threads pulled and distorted. That was one of 4 I had to cut off to to remove the axle. When I questioned the owner as to how it was possible for me to hand-torque this nut 3 months prior, he admitted he had a flat tire, the nut came off without a problem, got the tire changed...and tightened the axle nut by standing on a breaker bar until the nut would no longer move.
My own personal bikes, I torque to spec with the threads dry, and have NEVER had a problem in 40 years. And if I ever do, it'll get a new axle and nut and I'll move on.
But, like everything else in life, do as you like what gives you peace of mind, because that's what youre going to do anyway. To each his own!

In this subject, the only item I take issue with is the factory service manual specifies changing the rear axle nut every time it's moved. Which means that, at $26 a pop I'd be out $130 for the chain adjustments and tire change I did in my garage. Notgonnahappen.com. When I questioned the Suzuki Regional Service Rep he said that was "Excessive". He advised to torque to spec with no lube, and to change the nut on an as-needed basis. The dealer service advisor, when I told him of this service manual issue said they usually change the nut every other oil change or if the threads are damaged.
But...as I pointed out that the factory service manual can be construed as a legal document, they allowed that they are probably going to charge out a nut every time one is moved on a customers bike.
Work at dealers long enough and you see the dark side of documentation real quick.
 

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Ok - lets say theoretically I am torquing that axle nut to spec on dry threads. If I hear a loud squeak, would that indicate I have gone too far and risk galling or worse? That sound and this forum would send me to the anti-seize and lower torque setting for sure. How many here have heard of a rear axle loosening? kfh000
 

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Ive torqued motorcycle axles for decades, never had that happen. But if I feel binding during loosening I already know the axle and nut threads are compromised.
I have had any problems with corrosion, but I have had issues with threads that have been stretched, pulled, or otherwise deformed through over-torquing by people that should be arrested for impersonating a mechanic. And as I've said, torque any fastener enough times, you can, not necessarily will developed enough wear in mating threads to reduce engagement and gall, or strip threads.
But it's weird, I tell ya...I just replace worn or damaged parts with new and I'm back in the game, no muss no fuss, then move on.
 

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I know...I am ...."that guy". I only use a torque wrench on engine bolts....everything else I go by feel. I always use never-seize on the axle and have never stripped one.....I'm either lucky ......or ....damn good....lol!
 
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