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So I added gold valves and .90kg springs to the front forks and damn what a difference. Didn't notice much on the ride to work today other then very little dive on braking, but took the dirt home and wow what a difference :thumbup:

But now I need to address the rear.
 

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So I added gold valves and .90kg springs to the front forks and damn what a difference. Didn't notice much on the ride to work today other then very little dive on braking
You havn't got it right yet then ;).

When the front is really well set up it's noticeable on my commute, really takes the sharp edges out of those urban obstacle courses.
Try lowering the fork oil level - that'll make it more compliant on the small hits.

It's really amazing how good you can get the suspension on a Wee - and yeah - the rear, $$$, but worth it.

Pete
 

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When the front is really well set up .... it takes the sharp edges out of those urban obstacle courses.
Pete
I talked to Sasquatch at length at the July West Fest Rally in Darby, MT. I plan on doing the Wee's suspension (both ends) this winter.

He said that properly set up, the bike would tend to "float over" the small, sharp bumps in the road (smooth them out) rather than be jolted by them. He said that the valving that was selected for each installation (which depends on our weight, riding style, bike load, etc), the springs that are installed (more a function of our weight and bike load) and the weight of the fork oil used (he strongly recommends Synthetic ATF) are the determining factors in the smoothness of operation of the suspension.

I assume the OP used the correct amount of fork oil during the rebuild. I guess I don't understand why lowering the level is going to help make changes to how the front suspension functions.
 

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I talked to Sasquatch at length at the July West Fest Rally in Darby, MT. I plan on doing the Wee's suspension (both ends) this winter.

He said that properly set up, the bike would tend to "float over" the small, sharp bumps in the road (smooth them out) rather than be jolted by them. He said that the valving that was selected for each installation (which depends on our weight, riding style, bike load, etc), the springs that are installed (more a function of our weight and bike load) and the weight of the fork oil used (he strongly recommends Synthetic ATF) are the determining factors in the smoothness of operation of the suspension.

I assume the OP used the correct amount of fork oil during the rebuild. I guess I don't understand why lowering the level is going to help make changes to how the front suspension functions.
With a high oil level you have a very non-linear air-shock in parallel with the oil/spring circuit. If the oil level is too high it's much harsher as the effective spring rate with small displacements is too high.

That assumes the emulator/oil weight is roughly right to start with.

Pete
 

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"He said that properly set up, the bike would tend to "float over" the small, sharp bumps in the road (smooth them out) rather than be jolted by them."

I have stock suspension and can't afford to replace it but was wondering if ATF would help stop the jolting. The rear I can soften up nicely but the front sucks. I'm about 165 pounds which is I think, why I feel a very harsh ride from the front. I've adjusted the preload up and down which has some effect on the dive when braking but almost no effect on the harshness. I'm guessing that would be caused by to much damping for my weight. I've also tried lowering the front to shift some weight forward and adjusting the rear to stop the jolting. It's the only feature of the bike bike that I hate so it would be great if it can be fixed without spending a bunch of money. Any suggestions?
 

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Dino M;724944 I'm about 165 pounds [/QUOTE said:
Dino, First, you're at the wonderful personal weight -- 165#. You're at the weight that most motorcycles are set up for from the factory -- 165#. That means that the spring rates are correct for you at your weight, but that does not mean the valving (or lack of valving) is correct for you and your riding style, loading, etc.

I would suggest you contact Sasquatch at "Suspension by Sasquatch" or some other similar suspension rebuilder and see what they suggest to you.
 

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Dino, First, you're at the wonderful personal weight -- 165#. You're at the weight that most motorcycles are set up for from the factory -- 165#. That means that the spring rates are correct for you at your weight...
Chuck, that's just not right. The Stroms are "set up" for someone who weighs about 70 lbs. Overall, bikes have a huge range of spring rates, in some cases bordering on the nonsensical. For example, the Kawasaki Ninja 500 and Ninja 650 are very close to the same weight. The 500 has .59 springs, barely enough for the weight of the bike alone, while the 650 has progressive springs that start at 1.2 and go up to 1.6, good for someone who weighs north of 400lbs.

I'm 165 and use 0.90s, 0.85s are about the minimum for that weight. Stock is 0.70.
 

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Chuck, that's just not right. The Stroms are "set up" for someone who weighs about 70 lbs.
Sorry, Dino. My mistake. Thanks Rich for correcting me. I was going with what I had always heard -- bikes are originally set up for someone in the 165# range.
 

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I talked to Sasquatch at length at the July West Fest Rally in Darby, MT. I plan on doing the Wee's suspension (both ends) this winter.

He said that properly set up, the bike would tend to "float over" the small, sharp bumps in the road (smooth them out) rather than be jolted by them. He said that the valving that was selected for each installation (which depends on our weight, riding style, bike load, etc), the springs that are installed (more a function of our weight and bike load) and the weight of the fork oil used (he strongly recommends Synthetic ATF) are the determining factors in the smoothness of operation of the suspension.

I assume the OP used the correct amount of fork oil during the rebuild. I guess I don't understand why lowering the level is going to help make changes to how the front suspension functions.
Chuck, do you plan to do that work yourself, or are you going to ride the bike out there? I'm interested in that work as well.
 

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Do you plan to do that work yourself?
John,

I'm planning on sending the rear shock out to Boise for the rebuild and doing the front forks here at home. Sasquatch says his normal turn-around time for a rear shock rebuild is about a week, if he has it in the schedule. I'll buy the fork springs and valving from him and use the instructions for the rebuild, etc. I've got a long time rider/mechanic friend just down the road for technical resource/assistance if necessary.

However, I won't do anything, other than ride, until winter sets in. I still have four or five rallies to attend (~5K miles) before then. The suspension work will happen when I strip everything else off and check the valves and do the other preventive work. This may also be time to think about a chain and sprockets -- I have 19K+ on it now. The miles are rolling up fast.
 

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John,

I'm planning on sending the rear shock out to Boise for the rebuild and doing the front forks here at home. Sasquatch says his normal turn-around time for a rear shock rebuild is about a week, if he has it in the schedule. I'll buy the fork springs and valving from him and use the instructions for the rebuild, etc. I've got a long time rider/mechanic friend just down the road for technical resource/assistance if necessary.

However, I won't do anything, other than ride, until winter sets in. I still have four or five rallies to attend (~5K miles) before then. The suspension work will happen when I strip everything else off and check the valves and do the other preventive work. This may also be time to think about a chain and sprockets -- I have 19K+ on it now. The miles are rolling up fast.
Me too, Chuck. 9600 on the Wee and 2200 on the DR since May. Retirement is the best job I ever had:hurray:
 

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Retirement is the best job I ever had:hurray:
Ain't it the truth. The good news is I'll have income as long as the State Universities' Retirement system is solvent. The bad news is the state is Illinois and SURS keeps most of its money in stocks.:scared:
 

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Ain't it the truth. The good news is I'll have income as long as the State Universities' Retirement system is solvent. The bad news is the state is Illinois and SURS keeps most of its money in stocks.:scared:
I hear ya! This country is on the brink......but I still love it.
 
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