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Cat Herder
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You'll never see one on a HD.

They wouldn't be able to "lay 'er down" incase something went wrong.
 

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Cowboys aint easy to love
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2,115 Posts
The Scotts Steering Stabilizer people will have to buy that product and quietly take it off the market. That's the American way, right?
 

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2,170 Posts
Please allow me to rant about this "product" for just a moment.

In a younger life, I spent 5 years working in a bicycle shop. In 5 years, i never once failed to train a child how to become proficient at riding a bicycle, without training wheels, in under 15 minutes.

Buffy and Kyle would stroll into the shop looking for a ride for their little darling. I treated them with tough love. The parents, that is. "Put training wheels on my child's new bike."

"No. Allow me a few moments of time out in the parking lot with your kid and his/her new bike. You stay in here and watch through the window, and don't come out until I say so."

"But... but... but..."

"I said shut your pie hole and stay inside. Little Johnny/Janie will be just fine."

And lo and behold, little Johnny/Janie was just fine, and once they discovered how their sense of balance worked, which takes less than a couple minutes with young kids, they were cruising around, looking at where they wanted to go (sound familiar, all you motorcyclists?), starting, stopping, and handling their new machine like a little Lance Armstrong. It was a beautiful thing. Then I'd tell Mom and Dad to drive immediately to the biggest quiet parking lot in their neighborhood and spend the afternoon reinforcing and practicing the new skills the kid just learned, so the muscle memory aspects of the training would take hold fast and stay in place.

If a child needs training wheels, the child is not yet physically developed to the point of safely being on a bicycle. Such is life, come back next summer and we'll try again. We'd like to make sure your child is not needlessly put in danger if we can help it. If a parent came into the shop for a second set of training wheels because the first pair was worn out, then I called the cops and child protective services at had the parent charged for the crime of being unable to teach a child anything. (Ever see a kid slowly riding a bike down a sidewalk, leaning to the side, riding on 3 wheels? That's not what they are for. A sign of an incompetent parent.) By the way, regardless of how big or strong or smart a child is, I never felt that kids younger than about 6-7 years old truly had what it takes to safely ride a bicycle, and my experience supported this theory every time the parents of a 4-5 year old brought their kids in to try out a bike. The mental maturity just wasn't there. (By the way, never, ever get a bicycle for young kids that have hand brakes or multiple gears that need shifting- they simply don't have the hand size, strength or coordination to operate such things. And those parts are usually of such low quality even an adult has trouble actuating those controls.) With kids younger than that age (~6-7), the concepts and skills necessary to successfully operate a piece of mechanized equipment is just a bit beyond their developed skill level, not to mention the maturity needed to take care of it, and by that I mean not laying it on the ground behind Mom's car, etc.

Phew. Where did that come from? Oh, well, thanks for letting me blow some long pent up steam.
 

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953 Posts
Still, this doesn't teach bad habits, it simply lowers the bar by increasing the resistance to falling over, and you can transition off it gradually.

Seems like a no-brainer to me if its not too expensive.

Technology is awesome! :thumbup:

Still waiting forever for my barely legal asian triplet femmebots/holo-sluts though, but I'm rooting on the Japanese for that one!
 

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Keith Code

As Keith Code says in his book, the problem we all have is that our first introduction to operating a two wheeled vehicle was a bicycle. The problem is, motorcycle counter-steer. When you add training wheels, you introduce that horrible notion that pointing the bars left makes you go left and vice versa.

Lucikly for me, my dad never let me have training wheels. He put me in a parking stall and said "ride around in circles. I'll come back in half an hour." When I had that down, he said, "okay, now coast down the hill." After that day, I could ride a bike. Now when panic situations come up in my motorcycle, I never steer the wrong way under duress. I might brake too hard, but I intuitively know how to move on a bike.

So, if this product doesn't screw up the counter steering effect, it'll make for good future BMW S1000RR owners.
 
S

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The way to experience this same phenomenon on a mc is to ride it faster than a few mph. :confused:
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #11
Sure, except it seems that most people here fall over when stopped, or at very low speeds.

The way to experience this same phenomenon on a mc is to ride it faster than a few mph. :confused:
 

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There was guy that did wheelies in 80's using a Kaw 1300 6 cylinder with a driveshaft. He used a gyro in his front wheel. I think he died here in Houston doing a thrill show. Doug with a Greek last name. He was a great stunt man.
 

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Premium Member
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LOST:mrgreen:

Have you never dropped your bike ?? What is the first thing to explode on impact ?? ................that dam blinky thing on the front.
 

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A high tech solution to a problem that didn't need one.
 

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Control Systems

We have traction control that can put 200 hp to the ground on a bike at full lean. ABS and Linked ABS systems can put a near-rookie at the same level of braking control as a 10 year veteran. Even ECUs have selectable modes now to keep the power under control in various conditions.

It seems to me that having an active system to control the bike's spatial orientation is next. Imagine a system that keeps the front wheel from washing out from under you, even if it means you're moving horizontally across the pavement...or simply keeps you from dumping it in a tight u-turn.

It's only a matter of time I suspect.
 

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I was upset with my daughter as she had training wheels on my 5 year old grandsons bicycle. They would lift the rear wheel going around turns and almost throw him. "But he needs them to ride, Daddy!" I took them off and prepared to take him to a park with lots of room to keep him from getting hurt if he fell. He asked if he could just try it one time before we left. I said yes and cancelled the park trip and he took off and didn't stop until I made him. Then he fell as he forgot to put his leg out! Never fell again and Grandaddy looked like the genius that he is. IMHO
 

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learning

As to bike learning, one good way is to remove the pedals, lower the seat a little so the kid can easily reach the ground, and let them scoot around on a flat parking lot or driveway. With no obstructions to trip them, and no way to get going too fast, along with easy ground access in case of a wobble, kids learn quick, and often will achieve some pretty impressive lean angles. They get tired of pushing pretty soon, and ask for the pedals.

As regards the gyro wheel, on a motorcycle it'd make the steering feel extremely heavy, and left-right transitions would be real work (power steering, anyone?). And it still wouldn't be strong enough to keep the bike from tipping. I suppose one could put a pair of pivoted ultra-high speed flywheels in a casing at the center of mass of the bike, with high-torque clutched motors on the pivots to effect attitude, heading, and lean changes when directed to do so by the three-axis autopilot. Might even have an auto-wheelie button, that interfaces with the ECU and antilock brakes to hold stable wheelies.
 
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