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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gave my 03 vee a coolant flush recently and the front connector that the front hose(from the thermostat) connects to ( to the front cylinder)started leaking at the base. Pulled everything out and the 2 hoses were shot. Also the 0 ring seal was shredded (front cylinder connector). Took 4 flushes to run the water clear from a coal black to finally clear ( before i took it apart). I got impatient waiting for the 0 rings from Bandit so tried a few of my own to a no go each time. Used RTV silicone too. Not sure if a sealant is required hear. Well, leaked both times. Even giving it the 24 hours the instructions say. Would appreciate any feedback by anyone that has done this before themselves. Thanks in advance!
 

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No sealant needed. Just clean the cavity with a Scotchbrite pad or something similar. Then apply a thin film of waterproof grease. I just used O-Rings from a kit.
 
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It's a pain in the butt, but you've got to remove the fittings (termed "coolant union") for a thorough cleaning before reassembly.

Mine had a decent amount of corrosion. Cleaned it up with a wire brush, fine sandpaper, and Scotch brite pads.

Some order new coolant unions. Unless the corrosion is very deep and there's pitting, I don't think this is necessary.
 

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You also need to clean the holes in the cylinder head, left when the unions are removed.

In my case the holes had nowhere near as much corrosion as the unions themselves. It was more about getting all the remains of the O rings. As you've seen, they eventually break down into a sticky, leaky mess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's a pain in the butt, but you've got to remove the fittings (termed "coolant union") for a thorough cleaning before reassembly.

Mine had a decent amount of corrosion. Cleaned it up with a wire brush, fine sandpaper, and Scotch brite pads.

Some order new coolant unions. Unless the corrosion is very deep and there's pitting, I don't think this is necessary.
Thanks. To be safe I'm ordering new unions too. Tried two generic 0 rings and did not work.Ordering Suzuki's to compare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You also need to clean the holes in the cylinder head, left when the unions are removed.

In my case the holes had nowhere near as much corrosion as the unions themselves. It was more about getting all the remains of the O rings. As you've seen, they eventually break down into a sticky, leaky mess.
Good advice. That''s why I'm taking out the rear as to referring to the 0 rings breaking down. The rear is not leaking now. I suspect it's responsible for black particles i keep seeing in the flush water.
 

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When you're that deep in the bowels of the engine, you may also want to replace the short section of fuel line that sits between the two brackets that hold the injectors in place. You need nothing fancy, just a short (<10cm) section of FI-rated fuel line with the appropriate inner diameter and two FI-rated hose clamps. Probably about five dollars at the local auto parts store, and five minutes of your time.

According to the manual, fuel line should be replaced every four years. Nobody does that of course, but at some point in time it becomes a good idea anyway.
 

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That's right, you want to do both. With the amount of work involved, doesn't make sense to only replace the o-ring that's leaking today.

Those leaky coolant unions just about drove me to distraction. I don't like replacing things based on a hunch, but the leak defied all my efforts at live observation. It 100% looked as if the thermostat housing was leaking. I think what was really happening was that the O rings would leak, then the loose coolant traveled down the short pipes to the cylinder heads by capillary action.

Speaking of which, I replaced those short pipes too. After some 13 years of service, the rubber was breaking down. It left residue on the union fittings
 

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When you're that deep in the bowels of the engine, you may also want to replace the short section of fuel line that sits between the two brackets that hold the injectors in place. You need nothing fancy, just a short (<10cm) section of FI-rated fuel line with the appropriate inner diameter and two FI-rated hose clamps. Probably about five dollars at the local auto parts store, and five minutes of your time.

According to the manual, fuel line should be replaced every four years. Nobody does that of course, but at some point in time it becomes a good idea anyway.
Sage advice. You'll also want real fuel injection clamps (not generic hose clamps) to replace the crimped-on factory clamps. I believe I used 7mm FI clamps when I did the repair last year. Blue loctite on the FI clamp screws, once they were tight. Just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When you're that deep in the bowels of the engine, you may also want to replace the short section of fuel line that sits between the two brackets that hold the injectors in place. You need nothing fancy, just a short (<10cm) section of FI-rated fuel line with the appropriate inner diameter and two FI-rated hose clamps. Probably about five dollars at the local auto parts store, and five minutes of your time.

According to the manual, fuel line should be replaced every four years. Nobody does that of course, but at some point in time it becomes a good idea anyway.
Are we talk en #8s here?
 

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No, correct general area but it's the short piece of hose that connects the two fuel injector rails. Termed "fuel delivery pipe" iirc. I'll see if I can find the right diagram later.
 

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No. It's component #5 in your last picture. Suzuki only sells the whole assembly consisting of two metal brackets that hold the injectors in place & feed the fuel, plus the short fuel hose between those. But you can easily snip the clamps off the fuel hose, slide the fuel hose off and replace it with new. Add two FI clamps and it's one less thing to worry about for the next decade or so.

Oh, when you refit this fuel delivery assembly, take it slow. Down the bottom of the injectors is the injector "cushion": a rubber ring that seals the gap between the injector and the throttle housing. Make sure they are in the proper place. Then slide the delivery assembly over the injectors while holding the injectors firmly in place. They're at a 90 degree angle but not at the same distance from the apex so there is a specific order to get everything in. 50% chance you'll get it right the first time... It helps if you have an extra pair of hands to hold the injectors. I did this alone in poor lighting conditions and in a bit of a hurry. As a result one of my cushions was not properly seated, so later it split and popped out. Leading to a massive vacuum leak, uneven vacuum across the cylinders and a minimum RPM of 2000 at idle... Not good.

The hoses down the bottom of that picture are not fuel hoses but most likely part of the vacuum system.
 

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Yes those lower hoses are in the vacuum system.

When I did my fuel delivery pipe replacement, I did not remove the fuel injectors. They did not want to come out. Had to remove the old short hose by twisting with needle nose pliers. Had to fold the new hose pretty hard to get it in place. Not ideal but there were no long term ill effects.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
No. It's component #5 in your last picture. Suzuki only sells the whole assembly consisting of two metal brackets that hold the injectors in place & feed the fuel, plus the short fuel hose between those. But you can easily snip the clamps off the fuel hose, slide the fuel hose off and replace it with new. Add two FI clamps and it's one less thing to worry about for the next decade or so.

Oh, when you refit this fuel delivery assembly, take it slow. Down the bottom of the injectors is the injector "cushion": a rubber ring that seals the gap between the injector and the throttle housing. Make sure they are in the proper place. Then slide the delivery assembly over the injectors while holding the injectors firmly in place. They're at a 90 degree angle but not at the same distance from the apex so there is a specific order to get everything in. 50% chance you'll get it right the first time... It helps if you have an extra pair of hands to hold the injectors. I did this alone in poor lighting conditions and in a bit of a hurry. As a result one of my cushions was not properly seated, so later it split and popped out. Leading to a massive vacuum leak, uneven vacuum across the cylinders and a minimum RPM of 2000 at idle... Not good.

The hoses down the bottom of that picture are not fuel hoses but most likely part of the vacuum system.
Ahh. Been coming in from the right side with the engine side bracket(mount) off with a jack under the engine. A couple of years since I took the injectors out to clean them. Will have to come in from the top to get to the rear connector and I'll have a closer look. Thanks for the information.
 

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If you don't have the airbox off yet, it might not be worth doing it. I assumed you came in through the top and then it's most likely you would've removed that fuel delivery assembly anyway for access to the coolant fittings below.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If you don't have the airbox off yet, it might not be worth doing it. I assumed you came in through the top and then it's most likely you would've removed that fuel delivery assembly anyway for access to the coolant fittings below.
I Know. And thanks BackPacker and all for your help. Just looking ahead now as i wait for the parts. Just loosen the boot clamps holding the throttle body on,lift and put on it's side without disconnecting the linkage. I got that right? I should figure this out as i go. Any precautions or short cuts would be appreciated. Thank again.
 

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Are you referring to taking the airbox off? No need mess with throttle body booths or linkage - all that stuff stays in place where it is on the engine. If you look just underneath the airbox you'll see that it's held to the top of the throttle bodies with two clamps. You'll likely need a long philips screwdriver to reach the clamp screws. Then the airbox just lifts straight off.

There is a connector to a sensor inside the airbox, and there's something else that's just mounted on the airbox. So there's two or three connectors to unplug. And there's a drain hose. All very easy to figure out.

This might help as well. The clamps are #7. Suzuki DL1000 V-STROM 2002 AIR CLEANER - MSP
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Are you referring to taking the airbox off? No need mess with throttle body booths or linkage - all that stuff stays in place where it is on the engine. If you look just underneath the airbox you'll see that it's held to the top of the throttle bodies with two clamps. You'll likely need a long philips screwdriver to reach the clamp screws. Then the airbox just lifts straight off.

There is a connector to a sensor inside the airbox, and there's something else that's just mounted on the airbox. So there's two or three connectors to unplug. And there's a drain hose. All very easy to figure out.

This might help as well. The clamps are #7. Suzuki DL1000 V-STROM 2002 AIR CLEANER - MSP
Yes . In my minds eye i thought taking off #7 clamp to take off the linkage was needed. Hopefully i can get at both union hose pieces no problem. I have in hand the two hoses, 0 rings and new clamps.Waiting on the unions . Might just put in what I have and skip the unions. My new engine ice coolant i drained again is turning black and wrecked.I hope its that rear union 0 ring that has turned to liquid coal like the front one so as to fix the problem. Thanks again.
 
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