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Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to get opinions on what people here consider the essential tools required to maintain a DL-650, as well as tools you'd really like to have, but can live without.

Thanks.
 

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12mm hex socket for the front axle
torgue wrench
hex sockets for 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, etc.
metric sockets of various sizes (rear axle - 22mm & 24mm I think)
front stand and rear stand are nice (Pit Bull, etc.)
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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i still have all the tools i used to have when i was modifying bikes in my younger days except for the air tools and the welder. sockets and wrenches are a must and air tools would be nice though an impact driver can handle a lot of situations. an air wrench is very handy for removing the front sprocket nut. a torque wrench is one must have tool. i wish i had a lift.
 

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I pack a 12 mm Allen wrench and two real, full size rear axle wrenches under the seat. May never need them on the road but you never know.
 

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One of the handiest tools I have in my 3 tier toolbox is a simple little bit from Sears.

Why is this such a little gem? Well to date I have never, ever had a screw that I could not remove.

One day a friend had broken the head off of his oil plug. I simply put a straight bit in and using a jack as a source of pressure, worked the threaded part out of the oil pan for him.

Know those pesky little screws - the ones that are about the consistency of overcooked oatmeal on the master cylinders for the clutch and front brake? All you do is use this and tap with a hammer as you start to remove the screw. It comes right out.

The price is very low for the things you can do with this tool!
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Impact driver. Hex ball drivers (look like screw drivers but with a ball hex bit)

 

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I have a Pit Bull NewFront stand. It lifts the front end by the steering tube and leaves you free to remove the fork tubes. It holds the bike securely when I am working on it. The DL650 requires its own special pin - 8T (8 Tall). Try finding that kind of information from your Chinese knock-off.

I have some T-handled allen wrenches 4,5,6 mm. They have the ball end which has munged up the cap screws on my fairings. When I find somebody with a bench grinder I am going to grind off the ball-ends.

I looked for a set of allen sockets. Sears had a set but it only went up to 10 mm. I found a single 12 mm socket by SK for 22.00. Then I found a whole set at Harbor Freight for 11.99. It includes 12 mm, 14 mm and 17 mm. Now those are sockets! I am going to carry a 12 mm with me. Not every mechanic would have one of those.

Metric sockets and a torque wrench. I like the kind that click when you reach the torque setting. 24 mm socket for the rear castle-nut. 22 mm open end wrench for the head of the rear axle.

medium quality crimpers - $10-15. I find them much better than the cheapo versions. I also have two high end wire strippers, the kind that cut and remove the insulation in one fluid movement. One is for wire sizes 26-16. The other is for 16 thru 10. If you match the wire size, they never nick the copper. $25 each. Check out Radar Electronics in Seattle.

Soldering station. Liquid flux.

I bought a mechanics stool from Sears before my last weekend of farkling. Cheap Chinese construction.. square holes in a flange were too big for the carriage bolts. This requires some post-processing. It has an adjustable seat and a tray to hold tools and parts. I should have thought of this 30 years ago.

Oh yeah, a rubber mallet is something I haven't heard mentioned.

Volt-ohmmeter.

A blunt ended punch is good for removing the plastic retainers on the fairings.

Needle-nosed pliers, diagonal cutters.

Inexpensive plastic caliper for measuring inner and outer diameters of bolts and sleeves. I used this to determine that I needed a 12 mm allen socket for the front axle.

Shop rags - lots of shop rags. And hand cleaner.

Tool for removing the oil filter. Mine is a Chevron version.

I am trying to put together a minimal set of tools to carry under the seat, so I am watching this thread for hints.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Be careful with liquid fluxes. They are usually acid based and not to be used for electrical work. Rosin based flux will not attack the metal when cool. Make sure any liquid flux is marked safe for electrical work.
 

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Well, if you buy liquid flux from Home Depot, you could have a problem. But if you buy your liquid flux from an electronics supply house and it is labelled rosin-based, then you are OK. Liquid flux is really useful if you have a large soldering area and/or the connectors have a hint of corrosion or oxidation. It makes the solder flow smoothly instead of forming little balls due to surface tension.
 

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- A l o n g set of needle nosed pliers, for attaching the throttle body extension tubes, and turning the darn screw.

I second the volt meter and the wheeled stool. My painters knees can't kneel very well. Once I learned about the stool I cannot work without it.

I do not own one, but a friend has a tool, sort of a vaccum pump making bleedling brakes a one man job. The tool has a guage making it a good tool for many other jobs as well.

Best tool for me though is a helping hand. A well put together young lady, blonde, err, usually for me that isn't the case. My kids or the neighbor kids are often more than willing to hold things, grab tools and ask tons of questions. Usually requires payment like a ride around the block, or wheelies down the street on the YZ or quad.
 
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