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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I bought some new grips and decided I may as well throw some heaters under them while I'm at it. Well i made the change which was easier than i thought it would be and the new grips are great...

My problem is wiring the heaters - every cable on this bike is wrapped like a sausage and its mighty difficult to access even the obvious ones like the headlight... I would like to use the spare connection though since it would be a no brainer for an extra farkle requiring a circuit.

My priblem is I can't get to the damn thing! It's buried so far in the middle of the bike and is so bloody short I can't manouver with it at all... How did everyone lese manage? I supose it would be easier if I had the right conector to fit to ther other end of it - anyone know if this is a standard piece? I MAY be able to hook something up under there if it was that simple, but even then the hope of getting to it is dim. I'm thinking I might have to try and remove the two adapters that are also attached to that line (no clue how I can do that with one crumpled hand and no line of sight) and pull the whole cord out the left side to get access... My problem then would be hooking it all back up. am I missing something? Is mone worse then others?

I've removed fairings, lifted the gas tank - nothing helps me get to it!
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I used a box cutter blade hot glued to a wooden dowel to cut the tape holding the connector in place. Then the connector was just barely reachable. Pliers with a very long nose will help and also be useful for throttle body synchronization.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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No. The only part moved was the hockey stick shaped black plastic part under the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Warren said:
Mine was taped down so short and tight I had to pull the tank and airbox to get to it. :roll:
Mine's bloody short too. Not sure what I'll do... this "swinging forward" of the radiator mentioned - is it doable?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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It is doable. In fact, it is the standard method to access the front spark plug with the tool kit's plug wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
greywolf said:
It is doable. In fact, it is the standard method to access the front spark plug with the tool kit's plug wrench.
Ohh, that gives me hope - I'll look at my service manual - thanks for the Idea!
 

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I had to unbolt my radiator to get to my connector. Good news is you just unbolt one side, then slide it off the fixed mounts on the other side. That gives you enough room to reach in & untape that rascal. It doesn't have much excess, so it doesn't move much. You can hook up to it using a horn connector, but mark the + and - sides of that thing 'cause both it's wires are the same color.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
fantastic - swinging the rad forward was the key!

thanks all - this is a key piece of info I haven't seen in any forums so far. Grip heaters rigged and ready to rock.
 

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I've been hunting for the mysterious connector to hook up my Tomtom ever since greywolf mentioned it. I was a bit reluctant to pull my bike apart when I wasn't exactly sure where the dang thing was. Anyhow I managed to find it (I think) so I took a picture -

This pic was taken from under the left side of the bike looking up behind the front cyl. Greywolf can you confirm that this is the correct connector?
Hope this helps.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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It does look like it. If the orange wire has a green stripe, it could be I guess. It should be between the front cylinder and the radiator though so I hesitate to confirm it for sure. Normally it's near the middle behind the radiator usually a little on the left side. It's taped to the wiring harness and has a black wire with a white stripe for ground and an orange wire with a green stripe for hot. The short lead that connects to the horn will have a connector opposite the horn end that will fit it.
 

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The colours are correct so I'll assume this is the plug, now I just need to be patient while the slow boat from japan take the 4 - 8 weeks to deliver the horn wire.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So it seems I may have clumsily crossed the wires - the thing is that its difficult to tell which wire leads to which socket within the stock connector bracket... The grips do heat up - can someone tell me if they are crossed would the grips still "work"? I'm presuming th eanswer is yes and that this is a no-no, but just want to be sure before I re-disect my bike!
 

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There is no polarity involved in heaters. There are two wires on each grip and two wires on the connector. As long as any one wire on the connector goes to any one wire on each grip and the remaining wire on each grip goes to the remaining wire on the connector, you're fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
phew splendid... that saves me a headache. I wasn't worried about anything blowing up but didn't want problems down the road seeing as how I've buried these things under glue beneath my grips!
 

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This uses the foam grip over the heater where the heater is attached over the stock grips with a bunch of advantages.
Has any one used PVC insulation instead of the store bought foam grips ??

Thanks
D-Dog


19.03.2005 12:50 Reply to Thread Quote

Member




Signup date: 23.12.2004 05:01
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 130
V-Strom Model: DL1000K4
I like the feel of foam grips and also wanted heated grips with a throttle lock and here's what I did.

First, I installed the NEP CC-4 cruise as described here:
http://11109.rapidforum.com/topic=112278931108

The NEP cruise control, the Symtec heated grip elements and the Grip-Tek foam grip covers that I used are all quite inexpensive and reasonably priced. Here's the link to the foam grip covers that I used (1.10 to 1.25" is the size I used):
http://www.grip-tek.com/detail.aspx?ID=36

As far as heated grips go, I decided against the Suzuki heated grips because others have reported that the heat is given off on the wrong parts of the grips, plus they are quite expensive. I didn't want to pay a high price for a sub-standard product.

I decided to install a set of Symtec ATV style heated grip elements over the stock grips and then cover the grip heater elements with foam grip covers. I used hair spray to lubricate the foam grip covers for an easy install.

The reason that I chose the ATV style grip elements and not the motorcycle style grip elements is because with my setup, the elements are at the same distance from the hands, plus the thick clutch side stock grip offers excellent insulation from the metal handle bar. I did some initial testing with my setup and it feels like I have even heat on both hands (so far, so good). Here's a few photos:









The Symtec ATV grip heater elements have equal wattage on both sides and produce 24 watts on high and 14 watts on low for each grip. Warning! Symtec warns that applying 24 watts of heat on a motorcycle throttle tube might melt the tube.

The Symtec motorcycle grip heater elements produce a different wattage on each grip with the idea that most people put the heater elements under the grips, so the clutch side heater element has more wattage because it is under a much thicker grip and there is less insulation between the heater element and the metal handle bar. (In my case I put the elements over the stock grips which is why I didn't use the motorcycle style grip heater elements.) The Symtec motorcycle style grip heater elements produce 18 watts on high and 9 watts on low on the throttle side.

So, is 24 watts too much heat for the V-Strom's throttle tube? Well, I don't know for certain, but here is what I've found out...

According to Symtec and V-Strom owners who have installed the Symtec motorcycle style heated grip elements, 18 watts of heat is safe for the throttle tube. A fellow V-Strommer reported that when he combined the high and low wires from the Symtec motorcycle style grip heater elements for the secret "super-heat" setting (9 watts + 18 watts = 27 watts), the throttle tube started to melt.

I figure that I'll play things safe and here is what I plan to do next:

I'll add resistors to reduce the Symtec ATV style grip heater elements high setting of 24 watts for both grips down to 18 watts. I've done some calculations and plan to add two 10 watt 5 ohm resistors in parralel to the high setting wires. With this setup, low will be 14 watts on each grip and high will be 18 watts on each grip (assuming that I got my calculations right).

If I get ambitious, I might also add LED indicator lights (in series with a 10 ohm resistor) for the heated grip elements.

Here is a useful grip heater FAQ page that I found:
http://faq.f650.com/FAQs/HotGripsInstallationFAQ.htm

Update: After using this setup for over a year now, I wouldn't change a thing. The heated grips have been great! I've only used them on low power, never needed the hi. Sometimes I would turn the grips on and off to regulate heat if too much. A lower power setting would be a welcome addition (I might add a resistor circuit to achieve this so that I'd have low power and super low power).


Post last edited by mark30pwr on 01.06.2006 08:38.

I like the feel of foam grips and also wanted heated grips with a throttle lock and here's what I did.

First, I installed the NEP CC-4 cruise as described here:
http://11109.rapidforum.com/topic=112278931108

The NEP cruise control, the Symtec heated grip elements and the Grip-Tek foam grip covers that I used are all quite inexpensive and reasonably priced. Here's the link to the foam grip covers that I used (1.10 to 1.25" is the size I used):
http://www.grip-tek.com/detail.aspx?ID=36

As far as heated grips go, I decided against the Suzuki heated grips because others have reported that the heat is given off on the wrong parts of the grips, plus they are quite expensive. I didn't want to pay a high price for a sub-standard product.

I decided to install a set of Symtec ATV style heated grip elements over the stock grips and then cover the grip heater elements with foam grip covers. I used hair spray to lubricate the foam grip covers for an easy install.

The reason that I chose the ATV style grip elements and not the motorcycle style grip elements is because with my setup, the elements are at the same distance from the hands, plus the thick clutch side stock grip offers excellent insulation from the metal handle bar. I did some initial testing with my setup and it feels like I have even heat on both hands (so far, so good). Here's a few photos:









The Symtec ATV grip heater elements have equal wattage on both sides and produce 24 watts on high and 14 watts on low for each grip. Warning! Symtec warns that applying 24 watts of heat on a motorcycle throttle tube might melt the tube.

The Symtec motorcycle grip heater elements produce a different wattage on each grip with the idea that most people put the heater elements under the grips, so the clutch side heater element has more wattage because it is under a much thicker grip and there is less insulation between the heater element and the metal handle bar. (In my case I put the elements over the stock grips which is why I didn't use the motorcycle style grip heater elements.) The Symtec motorcycle style grip heater elements produce 18 watts on high and 9 watts on low on the throttle side.

So, is 24 watts too much heat for the V-Strom's throttle tube? Well, I don't know for certain, but here is what I've found out...

According to Symtec and V-Strom owners who have installed the Symtec motorcycle style heated grip elements, 18 watts of heat is safe for the throttle tube. A fellow V-Strommer reported that when he combined the high and low wires from the Symtec motorcycle style grip heater elements for the secret "super-heat" setting (9 watts + 18 watts = 27 watts), the throttle tube started to melt.

I figure that I'll play things safe and here is what I plan to do next:

I'll add resistors to reduce the Symtec ATV style grip heater elements high setting of 24 watts for both grips down to 18 watts. I've done some calculations and plan to add two 10 watt 5 ohm resistors in parralel to the high setting wires. With this setup, low will be 14 watts on each grip and high will be 18 watts on each grip (assuming that I got my calculations right).

If I get ambitious, I might also add LED indicator lights (in series with a 10 ohm resistor) for the heated grip elements.

Here is a useful grip heater FAQ page that I found:
http://faq.f650.com/FAQs/HotGripsInstallationFAQ.htm

Update: After using this setup for over a year now, I wouldn't change a thing. The heated grips have been great! I've only used them on low power, never needed the hi. Sometimes I would turn the grips on and off to regulate heat if too much. A lower power setting would be a welcome addition (I might add a resistor circuit to achieve this so that I'd have low power and super low power).


Post last edited by mark30pwr on 01.06.2006 08:38.



VStrom Tom
19.03.2005 14:33 Reply to Thread Quote

Twist of the Wrist!
Member




Signup date: 09.12.2004 18:56
Location: Cochrane, Alberta
Posts: 184
V-Strom Model: DL650K5
Thanks for the info/links Mark. I have been pondering a similar type of setup and ran into the same dilemma with the Symtec elements. I have been experimenting with 32 gauge wire which seems to work well but was unsure as to the best wattage, I will shoot for 18 watts as your info suggests. Where did you order your NEP cruise from? Lets us know how your setup turns out.



mark30pwr
19.03.2005 15:09 Reply to Thread Quote

Member




Signup date: 23.12.2004 05:01
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 130
V-Strom Model: DL1000K4

Quote:
VStrom Tom wrote on 19.03.2005 13:33
Where did you order your NEP cruise from?



From my local motorcycle shop, they ordered it in for me.



mark30pwr
20.03.2005 00:11 Reply to Thread Quote

Member




Signup date: 23.12.2004 05:01
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 130
V-Strom Model: DL1000K4

Quote:
mark30pwr wrote on 19.03.2005 11:50
I'll add resistors to reduce the Symtec ATV style grip heater elements high setting of 24 watts for both grips down to 18 watts. I've done some calculations and plan to add two 10 watt 5 ohm resistors in parralel to the high setting wires. With this setup, low will be 14 watts on each grip and high will be 18 watts on each grip (assuming that I got my calculations right).
 

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Farmerjoe, here's your quote:
phew splendid... that saves me a headache. I wasn't worried about anything blowing up but didn't want problems down the road seeing as how I've buried these things under glue beneath my grips!

Question IS, what do you mean ? Did you try this idea of glueing over the rubber grips, then foam grips over the heater?
Sounds like great idea, but I have not tried it and have you tried the hardware store pvc pipe insutlation ?

thanks
D-dog
 

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Also the missing answer is how and where do you run the power to the grips , the horn plug, tail light run light or where ?
 

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Great and much appreciated on the advice on the grip mounting. Looks socool and how do people come up with these ideas?

The question is where and how did you run your power wires a[FONT COLOR=dark blue]nd wire size, from the horrible to get at horn extension, tail light run light or where? any photos would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
D-dog
 
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