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I've been mostly lurking around here for 3 years since I got my K7 DL650, sucking in a wealth of information. Every spring there's a bunch of posts reporting accidents, and the newspapers telling similar tales. I've come to believe that there are a bunch of genuinely good people that frequent this forum, so I thought I should start giving back with a tip that might just save someone someday.
In WV, on our way home from a 2-up camping trip from PA to the dragon, my wife and I were approached at a gas station by a man that saw our PA plate and struck up a conversation. He told us that he used to ride but gave it up after an accident. He shared this tip: YOUR SHADOW KNOWS. Your shadow tells you from where to expect trouble. When riding, and you see your shadow out in front of you (or somewhat left or right), it means that the sun is low in the sky and your shadow points exactly to the spot where someone would be blinded by the light. I can't say that I've ever heard of this tip put this way on any forum, in the MSF course, or anywhere else.
 

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Something to think about for sure. Also used by fighter pilots to their advantage, I've heard!
 

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Excellent tip that I am glad to have in my arsenal of awareness. Thanx
 

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Something to think about for sure. Also used by fighter pilots to their advantage, I've heard!
I'm thinking if you are a fighter pilot and you are in your plane, and you can see a shadow, you are definitely in the trouble zone :green_lol: Sorry, could not resist, my bad.
 

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Your shadow tells you from where to expect trouble. When riding, and you see your shadow out in front of you (or somewhat left or right), it means that the sun is low in the sky and your shadow points exactly to the spot where someone would be blinded by the light.
Thanks for passing along a great tip....:thumbup:
 

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Thanks for the tip. I've used the opposite when fishing (don't let your shadow hit where your going to cast) but never thought to apply it to motorcycling. Good idea.
 

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I have pondered that myself. If I can see my shadow, it usually means I have no problem seeing oncoming traffic. It was a bit of a revelation when I realized the opposite must be true for them. And vice versa. Good post. :thumbup:
 

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Living the Stereotype
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Thanks fo the tip, I usually try to be aware of when I might be obscured by glare, this is another handy reminder.

Was the "Dragon" a worthy destination?
 

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I commute east in the morning and west in the afternoon. Spring and fall when the sun is low at those times is the worst. Not only can the approaching traffic not see you very well, you can't see any traffic coming up on your 'six'.
 

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Thanks fo the tip, I usually try to be aware of when I might be obscured by glare, this is another handy reminder.

Was the "Dragon" a worthy destination?
Absolutely. Took Skyline Drive, and all but the northernmost 100 miles of the BRP (it was raining and foggy, so went down to I81 to make some time and get to better weather). There was no traffic on the BRP in early October, (summer tourists gone, and no leaf-peepers yet) so I probably averaged 50 mph with occasional blasts higher. In Smoky Mtns NP, I got the idea to go to Cades Cove. Unfortunately there was traffic there, as I'm sure people familiar with the park know. I can't believe how many people have apparently never seen a deer before, or perhaps even a rabbit. It was painful. I was seething silently, but my wife was seething unsilently which made things even worse. We finally got to Parsons Branch Rd (about halfway around the RV-infested loop) after what seemed like hours at a slow crawl in bumper to bumper traffic. I wasn't sure about taking Parsons Branch with my wife on the back and loaded with camping gear, but we talked to some rangers that said they took their car through a few weeks back, but things can change. We went for it anyway. Better to risk disaster than sit for another 2 hours on the other half of the loop.

There are some deep whoopdies at the beginning, but I just explained to my wife beforehand that I may get bogged down, may have to stop, and if the bike wants to go over just get her feet off the pegs and put em on the ground, not under the bike. Anyway, in the whoopdies my wifes whole demeanor changed. She was giggling and may have said "weee!" a couple of times. The rest of Parsons branch was fun and beautiful, and as you know it dumps you right in the middle of the dragon. Didn't even stop, went from trail mode right into dragon mode. I was never on a road like that before by myself, let alone 2-up. I was actually smiling and laughing inside my helmet, and I think a tear came to my eye once or twice. My wife never told me to slow down, and I was going as fast as one could on a 650 with an extra 400 lbs on it. At one point my foot hit the pavement, as did my wifes. (I must ride duck-footed or something.) We both loved it. It was the most fun I ever had with clothes on.

I'm envious of your location.
 
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