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I don't keep track so I can't provide an average, but the longest I've gone on my 2012 is 275.
Most people I know get much better mileage than I do (something to do with riding style :) ); and based on what I have read here on Stromtrooper over the years almost everyone in the USA gets amazingly better mileage than I do.

..Tom
 

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Canadians have stronger wrist muscles, probably from all that snow shoveling. :mrgreen:


I got a negative review for a joke not taken as a joke at another site so I want to be clear.
 

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Truthfully, the Tiger 800XC is next to perfect regarding most of the above requirements. The thrifty side of me made me want the v-strom. To be clear, I have no regrets. Regarding future upgrades:
1) 19" front, spoked tubeless tires
2) Lower first gear
3) Another 20HP/15lb torque for increased fun factor

Everything else, I appreciate the personal choice and taste of farkling. Maintain a healthy aftermarket for upgrades/farkles for personality.
 

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Canadians have stronger wrist muscles, probably from all that snow shoveling. :mrgreen:


I got a negative review for a joke not taken as a joke at another site so I want to be clear.
Being German by Birth I very much understand humour (we had weekly lessons in it) and therefore very much enjoyed your humour.

..Tom
 

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If you ask me, the Wee is *ALMOST* perfect, as is. The only things I'd change:
1) More ground clearance.
2) Spoked wheels.
3) Lighter weight/lower C.G. (but see note below).
4) Smaller, lighter, more aerodynamic front fairing (the 2012 and on Wee's were a step in the right direction).
5) Six gallon gas tank (the 2012's were a step in the *wrong* direction here, although it does help with weight and C.G.).

Pretty much everything else can (and IMHO, should) be aftermarket additions, and to be honest, some of the weight reduction can be achieved through aftermarket, as well. For example, on my K9, I am planning to replace the battery with a Shorai when the OEM gives up the ghost, and if I could stop throwing money at other things long enough to save up a few bucks, I'd put a lighter, less restrictive aftermarket exhaust on.

Honestly, I'm pretty happy with everything else, especially the engine. The 650 is plenty peppy for me, and there's always the 1K if you want to tour with a passenger and camping gear. But for those of us who want a reasonably capable tourer that can also head out into the back country on a whim, light weight, ground clearance, range and robustness are at the top of the wishlist.
 

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Future Wee

Hi, I like my 2010 Wee as it is but many of the suggestions in this thread sound ok, the only one that really made my ears prick up is the shaft drive. Bring that on!
However, I have a 'wish' that I could get a Wee, or any other non - cruiser bike, with the option of forward foot controls. To explain:
To cope with cramped legs and resultant back pain on long rides I have mounted highway pegs as have many others. Mine are bolted across the front of my heavy duty engine guard. This is the perfect place for my legs to stretch out to for comfort. BUT I hate having my feet away from brake and gears. So - what about a repeater for both, out front? Clever designers could design a type that folds up. A brake is only pushed down, so it could fold up on contact with rock or twig. Similarly, if the forward gear arrangement were a 'rocker' ie push back down to go up a gear and front down to go down a gear (Cruiser style) this could fold up also.
Then we'd have a bike that had comfortable highway cruising, as well as existing controls for any dirt stuff.
Comments?
 

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A lot of votes here for wire wheels, I had them on my BMW and hated them. For true off roading they might be needed but I am lazy.

1. Lightweight shaft drive
2. 750cc but just bore or stroke the current motor. Keep the small size.
3. Place the muffler lower or make it an integral bash plate so the saddlebags can tuck in.
4. Better fairing with power adjustable windshield.
5. Make the fuel tank larger and use the larger size to redirect all the air coming up and hitting the rider. Do away with the plastic tank covers and make the tank plastic. The European companies do it. Place the large volume low like the BMW Adventure models for some leg protection.
6. A decent seat.
7. Options that are reasonably priced and work. (I bought the OEM heated grips, saddlebag liners and hand guards for my 2012 Adventure. Sold the grips and the liners. The hand guards may get changed this winter. All expensive junk sold at a huge loss.)
8. A centerstand should be standard or not $250 to $300.
9. Real tires from the factory. The Trail Wings make good rim protectors.
10. Better brakes or at least braided lines.
11. Lighter is always better but may be costly.

Am I willing to pay for this? Yes. If needed make it a new model and if it was $1,500 more than the 650 I'd be there.
 

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Can someone explain the reason for all the shaft drive votes to the slow guy? My first bike (a CB550) was a shaftie, and my cafe racer project (XS750, still under construction) is a shaft drive, too. Personally, I'm much happier with the chain drive on the Wee. The shaft is heavy, complex and too restrictive. On the XS, I am stuck with XS wheels, at least on the back. On the Wee, I can have Woodies make a set of wheels for me if I want or go with OEM, because it's easy to find a hub to take a 525 sprocket. On the Wee, I can -- and did -- change the gearing for more pep in town and better control off pavement. For an upcoming trip with lots of long highway miles, I'll be changing gearing again for smoother highway cruising. With a shaft drive, changing gearing is non-trivial. Finally, while chains require a little more maintenance, cleaning and lubing is a ten minute job even for a complete n00b, and even replacing chains and/or sprockets is rather straightforward. On the other hand, I've heard enough horror stories from the guys riding the big BMW's to make me leery of a shaft drive ADV bike if you're going very far off the beaten path. So what am I missing? What's the big plus to offset these drawbacks?
 

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Less weight, Light makes it right, Spoke wheels 21 in front and 18 in rear
Plastic like the older KLRs that will bend and not break,,, Larger gas tank,
H/P is OK if they can bring the MPG up ,
Of course I got 1000 not a 650,
I have a rule if its over 500 LBs keep it out of the dirt,,,
Mike
 

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I agree with TheWall. Shaft drive would be a major turn-off for me. It is not worth the extra weight. I guess a lot of people are too lazy to oil a chain occasionally.

It's obvious from the variety of responses in this thread that Suzuki would have to have two versions of the new strom, one more off-road oriented, and one more street oriented--similar to the Triumph Tiger 800 and 800XC.
 

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...
Finally, while chains require a little more maintenance, cleaning and lubing is a ten minute job even for a complete n00b, and even replacing chains and/or sprockets is rather straightforward.
...
Since cleaning chains is a waste of time you can scratch that off the list; and lubing the chain with every tank of gas tanks about 10 seconds and lets you chain last 45,000+ miles. Not a lot of extra maintenance compared to repacking a shaft drive system.

..Tom
 

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Since cleaning chains is a waste of time you can scratch that off the list; and lubing the chain with every tank of gas tanks about 10 seconds and lets you chain last 45,000+ miles. Not a lot of extra maintenance compared to repacking a shaft drive system.

..Tom
Not to hijack the thread -- and certainly not to be argumentative -- but at least for my environment and riding style, 45K miles seems a bit optimistic. I didn't clean my chain much although I was pretty good about keeping it lubed. However, at ~16K miles, my front sprocket was showing a pretty significant hook:


...so I replaced the chain and sprockets (both front and rear). The chain still looked pretty good, as did the rear sprocket, but everything I read said change them all when any one is starting to show wear. Is your 45K mile figure based upon mostly street riding, or do you spend much time on dirt and gravel roads? Rain or dry weather? Again, please don't take this wrong; I'm still fairly new to both the Strom and to riding in general, so I'm just curious why your figure is 3x what I experienced on my bike.
 

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Not to hijack the thread -- and certainly not to be argumentative -- but at least for my environment and riding style, 45K miles seems a bit optimistic. I didn't clean my chain much although I was pretty good about keeping it lubed. However, at ~16K miles, my front sprocket was showing a pretty significant hook:


...so I replaced the chain and sprockets (both front and rear). The chain still looked pretty good, as did the rear sprocket, but everything I read said change them all when any one is starting to show wear. Is your 45K mile figure based upon mostly street riding, or do you spend much time on dirt and gravel roads? Rain or dry weather? Again, please don't take this wrong; I'm still fairly new to both the Strom and to riding in general, so I'm just curious why your figure is 3x what I experienced on my bike.
I don't mind people having a different viewpoint than mine! That's how we learn thngs!

Most people lube the chain roughly every 600 miles. The chain needs much more lube than that. Most people clean the chain; My personal thought is that it's highly over-rated. Cleaning is mostly cosmetic. Anything that can get into where it matters is likely to hurt the o-rings andl ubing often tends to remore most grit and stuff.


The last chain I replaced was at 74,845 km or 46,404 miles. I was going to be starting a long trip so replaced it then although it had some life left in it. I think the replacing as a unit isn't important. I tend to use the front sprocket up by around 30,000 miles and put in a new front one with no issues.


I commute a lot, but almost every day as part of my commute I will be riding on gravel roads. Today I think I was on them for about 5 miles maybe more and may be on them on the way home tonight as well (it is pouring rain here so might not as I don't really love riding in mud.). My chain and sprockets look as dirty as yours.

I also routinely ride in rain, often pourig rain. I ride in cold, hot, rain, light snow, have got caught in heavy duty freezing rain, have been caught behind a truck that was "Brining" a hghway and got coated with salt. I have gotten stuck in snow drifts a few times as well.

My friends also say that I am not the most gentle rider either.

..Tom
 

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Interesting...similar riding conditions and similar riding styles, it sounds like, except that I've never been stuck in a snowdrift, lol. I was trying to lube at ~600 mile intervals, since that's what the manual recommends, although there were a few times I didn't lube it quite that often. However, when I installed the new Ek chain, they recommended 300 mile lube intervals, so I've been trying to lube at every tank of gas (as you recommended earlier), and clean every 2 - 3 tanks. Anyway, thanks -- I appreciate the input!
 

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... and clean every 2 - 3 tanks. Anyway, thanks -- I appreciate the input!
Just don't bother cleaning.

I will typically fill up between 300 and 400 km so that is 180 to 240 miles. If I ride in rain I will lube as soon as I can. My first two chains were lubed as per the manual and were replaced at 21,018 miles (OEM) and 23,498 miles (DID X-Ring and this was shot but I didn't know it was shot until a ways into a 3,000 mile ride.)

Edit in case this message is referred to on its own: the next chain, DID X-Ring, lubed with Wurth HHS2000 with every fuel fill and after every rain ride was replaced at 74,845 km or 46,404 miles and had some life left.

I'm pretty into the Wurth stuff.. it sound great and seems to work. Juut makes a huge mess, at least the way I use it.

..Tom
 

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Chain vs Shaft

I would keep the chain for weight and cost considerations as well as the fact that I can easily fix a problem with chain drive. I carry chain wax and WD40 on the bike and with a center stand lubing is not an issue and I never clean a chain as I think it could be pushing grit into areas that could increase wear. 14K and my chain and sprockets look new.
 

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As I prefer to lube from the inside of the chain run it takes longer and normally I put a piece of cardboard behind the chain to keep it off the tire. An original equipment chain oiler or an enclosed chain as on bikes of old would be a good compromise. An enclosed chain in an oil bath would be great but I think it would also be a headache.

Having ridden my 2012 a bit more let me add a switch to turn off the abs. Scared me more than once not being able drag the rear tire. Maybe even different modes similar to an over priced/over rated BMW?
 

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A lot of votes here for wire wheels, I had them on my BMW and hated them. For true off roading they might be needed but I am lazy.

1. Lightweight shaft drive
2. 750cc but just bore or stroke the current motor. Keep the small size.
3. Place the muffler lower or make it an integral bash plate so the saddlebags can tuck in.
4. Better fairing with power adjustable windshield.
5. Make the fuel tank larger and use the larger size to redirect all the air coming up and hitting the rider. Do away with the plastic tank covers and make the tank plastic. The European companies do it. Place the large volume low like the BMW Adventure models for some leg protection.
6. A decent seat.
7. Options that are reasonably priced and work. (I bought the OEM heated grips, saddlebag liners and hand guards for my 2012 Adventure. Sold the grips and the liners. The hand guards may get changed this winter. All expensive junk sold at a huge loss.)
8. A centerstand should be standard or not $250 to $300.
9. Real tires from the factory. The Trail Wings make good rim protectors.
10. Better brakes or at least braided lines.
11. Lighter is always better but may be costly.

Am I willing to pay for this? Yes. If needed make it a new model and if it was $1,500 more than the 650 I'd be there.
I posted this back in June. I have since put almost 7,000 miles on my 2012 650 V-Strom Adventure aeverything stays except I will not condemn the Bridgestones so bad. They have worked much better than I thought after I bumped the pressure above recommended to 38/40. Maybe high for off road but much better on road and they seem to do ok on hard packed dirt and gravel. That said, I doubt I will ever purchase a set. They are not that good but decent OEM tires.
 

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:mrgreen: Larger fuel tank and side bag brackets that don't take up and entire lane of the highway! Compass? Fuel gauge with smaller increments that allow rider to see more accurately how much fuel is left?
 
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