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I installed a HaloCam M1 system a couple of years ago and have been please with it. From the description of the Innov K2, it sounds very comparable. The HaloCam lacks the parked mode monitoring, which would be nice for when I'm out and about, but I keep it locked up at home, so it's not as much of a concern for me there. Once thing I really like about it is that you can either hardwire it into the electrical system, or you can use an included USB pigtail. I purchased a USB power convertor and hardwired that into the electrical under the seat, and now I have an extra USB power port available if I need it. Unfortunately, the M1 doesn't seem to be available any more. They were working on an upgrade to it, but I don't know what's happened since the whole pandemic thing started.
 
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Discussion Starter #62
The Innovv K2 can be powered via USB as well. There is a micro USB input port under the rubber weatherproofing flap. DVR doesn't draw much power so pretty much any USB charger will do.

However, powering the K2 via USB means you can't use the parking mode features, since the way most people have their bikes set up means the USB charger only gets power when the key is "on."

It also means no graceful shutdown - the DVR simply stops recording when you turn the key off. The last 2 video files (one each front and rear) get corrupted.

Well, it also means the DVR's waterproofing is compromised, as you must have the rubber flap out of the way to plug in USB power.

Powering the K2 by USB is therefore really only good for bench testing, or in case you have a problem with the 12V power converter. I had my K2 set up on USB power for a while, when I was having trouble with the old, defective power converters.
 

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Thanks so much for this. It's maybe the only comprehensive review I've found of the Blueskysea B1M, ever, that wasn't a YouTube video.

Nothing wrong with YouTube reviews per se, but I prefer text with photos vs. video most of the time.
Some more details since you may be interested in them.
  • Videos are cut at 3, 4 or 5 minutes only and numbered secuentially with an F for front and a B for back cameras, so you end up with bunches of them.
  • GPS is now working fine. The coordinates are burn into the video and displays the speed calculated from it, along with the timestamp. Timestamp has a setting for timezones.
  • You can choose to display mph or kmph.
  • It has a remote control with a button for locking the current video from being over written later, and some status leds.
  • It also has bump detection to lock videos with 3 degrees of sensitivity, tough is way too sensitive.
  • Can be run on motorcycle current or from USB power.
  • The manual is not that deep and many things you'll just have to figure them out.
  • The mic is on the remote control and doesn't have wind protection so you'll have to add your own if you want to have useful sound.
  • There are settings in the app that only display of there's a GPS module connected (you should totally get it)
Honestly, if you're not looking for vlogging the videos, I think is a very nice device for the price.

If at all possible, I'll upload a couple videos so you can judge by yourself.

Sorry for the typos, I'm on mobile and sorry for my English too.

Cheers.
 

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Here are the videos:
Front and back.

Keep in mind both cameras are shaky, missaligned and a bit dirty (front one a bit more)

Firmware is 20200901 version, which fixes some of the sharpening that the previous ones had.

Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
So Blueskysea is still providing firmware updates for the B1M? Nice. Some manufacturers wouldn't bother to keep supporting an older product.

I've been impressed by the work that both Innovv and Viofo have put in to firmwares for their respective systems. We keep getting bug fixes and occasionally new features. Updates to the corresponding Android apps continue as well. Innovv has the more polished Android app of the two, which is good as the app is the only access to system settings.
 

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That wind rustle is what I always get at speed, except for the camera on my Versys as that camera is on a shelf behind the screen. That is not where I really want to mount the camera, but at least it is quiet and records the engine noise.
I'm thinking that the only cure is a remote microphone somewhere out of the wind-stream.

Iker, I suggest that you experiment with different strips of rubber, or rubber mounts, and the tension under which you tighten them. I found something like this 10 Pack Screw On Rubber Door Stoppers, With Screw, Bumper, Stopper, Protection | eBay at the local hardware store and put one above, and one below the shelf with a bolt to hold the camera mount to the shelf.
With a bar mount experiment with different/more strips of rubber and better bar end weights.
 

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Have any of you tried post processing stabilization?
 

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Not me. My Mobius though does have a vibration stabilisation on/off feature in its software.
 

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Unfortunately software stabilization does not work, the vibrations captured are to heavy. Trying to stabilize only makes the quality even more worse.
Interesting. I would have thought that the type of vibration you get on a bike would be relatively easy to correct for.
Perhaps this thinking bit isn't my strong suit. :)
 

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That wind rustle is what I always get at speed, except for the camera on my Versys as that camera is on a shelf behind the screen. That is not where I really want to mount the camera, but at least it is quiet and records the engine noise.
I'm thinking that the only cure is a remote microphone somewhere out of the wind-stream.

Iker, I suggest that you experiment with different strips of rubber, or rubber mounts, and the tension under which you tighten them. I found something like this 10 Pack Screw On Rubber Door Stoppers, With Screw, Bumper, Stopper, Protection | eBay at the local hardware store and put one above, and one below the shelf with a bolt to hold the camera mount to the shelf.
With a bar mount experiment with different/more strips of rubber and better bar end weights.
I bet that it has to be with the weight of the camera and the fact that its atached from a single point, rather than from the entire length of the body.

I tried to put some rubber ring around the camera but then the attachment ring wouldn't fit and I ran out of ideas.

In any case, the topbox plate vibrates already so maybe finding a less shaky place would be the place to start and then mount it from two points with rubber only.
 

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Interesting. I would have thought that the type of vibration you get on a bike would be relatively easy to correct for.
Perhaps this thinking bit isn't my strong suit. :)
There is nothing wrong with your line of thoughts!
Warping (or stabilizing) was the first thing I tried. But the Jello effect vibrations does not go away, stabilizing in post only makes them more terrible. And it takes for ever, even with a powerful computer.
Only thing that would help is a better constructed camera lens and EIS (Electronic Image Stabilization).
 

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Discussion Starter #78
I'm not surprised that post-processing EIS doesn't work on the dashcam video. The software is mostly guessing at the corrections needed. I would think you would need to incorporate some kind of extra data (perhaps accelerometer readings) to have a chance at accurately removing the unwanted camera movements. That would get complicated really quickly.

I'm not sure how GoPro does it, but they're supposedly really good at electronic image stabilization. But, if I understand correctly, it's done during recording somehow.

I also feel like there should be some way to build a mechanically-stabilized camera mount. It wouldn't have to be precisely machined or use gyroscopes or be too elaborate. I think if you could damp out the higher-frequency vibrations, reducing it to a gentle swaying at worst, it would help a lot. Camera mass and geometry are known and fixed, so it shouldn't be an impossible engineering problem.
 

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I'm new to this thread and am just beginning to get into moto-video.
Is it just smoke when I read descriptions like: "Equipped with the enhanced brushless motor and iSteady 3.0 Anti-Shake algorithm, iSteady X foldable gimbal for iPhone can help you eliminate shakes to a large extent and product smooth footages."
Have these been tried and abandoned?
 

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Discussion Starter #80 (Edited)
Sounds like marketing nonsense. That phone mount seems intended for handheld or tabletop use. I'm not convinced it would work when mounted on a bike, & dealing with constant vibrations. That's assuming you could find a good way to mount it.

Moreover, an iPhone would make a lousy dashcam.

Such a device might work on a proper dashcam camera, but at $70 each would be a really expensive method.

I need to find some un-YouTub'd video of the Thinkware M1 showing its EIS. Curious whether it really works.
 
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