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Hey all,

I'm new to these forums so I hope this is an OK topic...

I want to do a fair amount of weekend camping this summer. Does anyone have a packing list they use - or a recommendation for a good tent?

It's just for me but I think I want a four person so I have enough room for my stuff and to be comfortable.

Any recommendations?
 

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REI is always a good place to go. 100% satisfaction or your money back. First 2 years of MC camping I used gear from discounters, and it did OK in good weather($100 for tent, sleeping bag and mat.). Not so well in the wind and cold. I now have better stuff from REI($400+ using sales in the spring) and been comfortable at low 20 degrees. 65 mph winds my tent was still standing. Over the last 6 years it has saved me $1000s in motels and is a lot more fun.
 

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You might check out Eureka Tetragon 8. IMO it's the Strom of the tent world. Not state of the art but does everything well. Four person,easy set-up/ take down, good ventilation, leak free and reasonably priced. On sale now at Campmor for $92.00. :mrgreen:
 

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Big Agnes

After lots of research I bought a Big Agnes Copper Spur Ultra Light 2 man tent.
Lots of space and very lightweight. I got it recently so haven't had a chance to use it yet.
 

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I picked up a Coleman Exponent Inyo 2 a few years ago and liked it well. Packs easily for the bike, sets up easily, a lot of mesh, and the 2 man has room for stuff inside out of the weather. I think you can still get them for $50-60 if you look around. I think they were something like $150 back then.
 

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I'll second the Eureka timberline. Been using one for 30+ years. Will take alot of abuse, relatively inexpensive and roomy enough. But then I'll also take only a 10'x10' sheet of painters plastic when I want to travel as a minimalist and leave the tent home. My son uses a Tadpole, by North Face I believe. Newer design, lighter material, breaths very well. Has a great screen roof for those times not using a rainfly.
 

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4 person tent

At the Vstrom East Gathering last year at Iron Horse, my next door neighbor had a huge (to me) 4-5 person tent. He carried it in (along with his folding chair, cot [or was it an air mattress...I forget], cooler, etc, etc. I asked him why he used such a large tent for one person. The reason: it allows him to stand up in the tent to get dressed. How hard is it for you to crawl out of your sleeping bag and get fully dressed in a 1-2 man tent.....probably in a horizontal position?? (for me, at 56 yrs old, I'm not as limber as I once was) I was jealous of his mobile "man-cave". I can see his point. Going from a 2-man tent to a 4-man tent does not cost double the price, and probably packs-down close-to a smaller tent.
 

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Started off motocamping with a 3 person tent, went to a 4 person. About 1.5lb difference in weight. Packs close to the same size. Doesn't feel nearly as cramped. Course the size of the rider is a major factor.
 

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If I don't have to carry it on my back, I don't care about a little extra weight for a whole lot more comfort.
 

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Before you buy a tent look very carefully at the pole length, I finally ended up with a Eureka Apex 2 man because the poles are only 15" long, makes packing a lot less bulky. Kieth:beatnik:
 

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As others have suggested the Eureka Timberline is a great tent. The only issue I have is it packs a little large.

The Eureka Adventure Apex is good light tent that packs small. Try to get the aluminum poles vs fiberglass as they are stronger in high wind.

Both tents are bargains at there current prices.

I would suggest also cutting some cheap Walmart tarp materiel to a footprint just slightly smaller than the tent's to protect the tent bottom from dirt and punctures.
 

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I'll second the Eureka timberline. Been using one for 30+ years. Will take alot of abuse, relatively inexpensive and roomy enough. But then I'll also take only a 10'x10' sheet of painters plastic when I want to travel as a minimalist and leave the tent home. My son uses a Tadpole, by North Face I believe. Newer design, lighter material, breaths very well. Has a great screen roof for those times not using a rainfly.
+3 on the Timberline. $79 @ Unclesams get the online coupon.
 

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Before you buy a tent look very carefully at the pole length, I finally ended up with a Eureka Apex 2 man because the poles are only 15" long, makes packing a lot less bulky. Kieth:beatnik:
That's why I got the apex 3xta (3-man, aluminum poles). It packs down bag and all to 18" long. Can't stand up in it but has gobs of room. Alot of good features and a couple of bad ones (for me). Been using it now for 7-8 years.

edit: I think the new name for them is "Pinnacle Pass".
 

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I've had two motorcycle camping tents and recommend a 7X7 floor, with a low dome shape. The Fly should extend almost to the ground on the sides of the tent, instead of being just part way down the sides, for better rain resistance. The low dome shape takes wind much better than higher tents that you can stand in. The 7x7 floor design will enable you to put yourself and any equipment and cases that you could possible fit on your bike inside. It also is roomy enough for an extra person and their gear. I have a Eureka Tetragon 7 and this is one of the best designs for a camping tent- a square dome of any good brand. Eureka Timberline series were the standard for scouting tents and are a good tent.
In case you're new to camping:
Stay away from the poly floors which look like tarps- they wear and leak quickly. Seal the seams in your tent floor as soon s you buy it, even if they say they are sealed.
Also, cut two pieces of 4 mil plastic and roll it up with your tent- one just undersize of the floor to go under the tent so that it prevents ground moisture but does not stick out and collect rain, and one piece for the inside that extends 3 inches up the sides of the tent on all sides. you will never be wet even if your campsite becomes a pond overnight. The most common mistake I see in the campground is people putting a tarp under their tent which sticks out a few feet, or two tents on one large tarp, which will collect rain water and trap it between the tent bottom and the tarp.

To waterproof your packed tent, roll it up as usual, but before putting it in it's stuff sack, put it into a garbage bag (the smallest bag which will work) and then squeeze the air out of it and loosly tie it, and then slide it in it's stuff sack to tie on the bike.
 

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