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Discussion Starter #1
Initially tried this last week on my 2007 DL1000, and ran into some problems right from the get go. The main one being that the tool I was using didn't have enough fluid in it (Motion Pro SyncPro). That caused air to get into/under the columns of fluid, and also made it easier for the engine to suck the fluid right out.

So, today we tried again, after a refill of the SyncPro tool with new fluid. Initially, my front TB seemed to be pulling more vacuum (higher column of fluid). My understanding was that turning the adjustment screw clockwise would open the plate more in the front (less vacuum) and close the plate in the rear throttle body (more vacuum). To simulate turning the screw in, you can gently pry up on the linkage below the screw with a flat blade screwdiver, and check results on the tool. Well, when I did this, the results were the opposite of what I expected. The fluid for the front TB rose higher, and the fluid for the rear dropped lower, and the bike acted like it wanted to stall. So, I ended up turning the screw out (counterclockwise) just a smidge. This got the two columns almost perfectly level with each other. Opened the throttle a few times and let it settle, still almost dead level. So I called that good.

The adjustment screw seems like it is only still held in by one or two threads after sync was obtained. Is that typical?

I took all the fairing pieces off to get to the throttle body vacuum ports to attach extension hoses that I ran out to the side of the frame. This proved easier than I thought it would be. Turning the screw with an 11" set of curved tip long nose pliers proved to not work as good as I thought it would. It was hard to tell whether or not I was actually turning the screw, and often it appeared I wasn't. I could not turn it with my fingers very well either. A screwdriver bit with a nut around it or something similar would be just about perfect. Even the cheap right angle ratcheting low-profile screwdriver I got from Harbor Freight was a little too tall to work.

I checked my rear throttle body boot, the one that is notorious for being blown off, and it was still solidly attached.

Bike seems to run well now, although it had started to run well before I did this procedure. I say "started" because I'd been experiencing times when shortly after a cold start, like after a minute or two, the bike would just cut off. Like you'd hit the kill switch. Before this happened it sounded like it was hunting a bit for idle. Also, it seemed to be more ornery than normal in the 3000 to 4000 constant throttle/load range. So, thought it might be time to check the TBs.

I'll see how she runs out on the road this weekend.
 

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This procedure can be quite finicky, turning the tbs screw one direction moves the adjuster off its seat resulting in no sync change until you squeeze the mechanizum back on its seat, turning the screw the other direction results in a synch responce.Those needle nose pliers need to be squeezed extra hard to turn the adjuster screw.Your idle hunting speed varations may be caused by too small a gap at the throttle lever gap,manual calls for. 012" inch.I've struggled with the tbs adjustments and learned slowly of the many mistakes that can be made.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So does my finding sound right to others who have done this procedure, that turning the screw counterclockwise OPENS the front throttle body primary, and closes the rear? I could have sworn I've read other people state the opposite.
 

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I haven't a clue which way the screws need to be turned to get a desired result...I just watch the manometer to see what happens when one is turned. if the fluid column (I use ATF in vinyl tubing) goes the way I want, fine, if not just turn the other way. A minor adjustment makes an easily discernable difference, at least in the apparatus I'm using.

But mine is a 650.
 
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