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Discussion Starter #1
So I hate the process of stripping off the tank and airbox to get to the set screw on the TBS synch. Yeah, I know, you can get some really long needle nose pliers and if your crash bars aren't in the way, you can adjust without having to remove the tank. Well, not for me. My Hepco & Becker bars get right in the way.

I got to thinking; has anyone taken the same assembly for the idle adjustment screw, attached it to the synch screw and mounted it somewhere for easier access? Seems to me that in combination with the vacuum line extensions, this would make for the easiest time adjusting the TBS.
 

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It's been discussed in the past.
It won't work.

The best thing to do is to buy the fancy right angled screwdriver from MotionPro (I think)

I f'ed around with mine, in an attempt to do something different and make it easier. One problem is finding another screw with the same pitch and diameter, I could not.

I f'ed up mine. Ended up brazing the top portion of an allen head socket to the top of it, now I use an allan wrench to do my adjustment.

Do your TBS and use a bit of nail polish where the threads of the screw meet the threaded sheet/nut to give a low strength 'thread lock'...



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Loosen the side panel, have someone hold the bottom out for you, then stick your right hand in there and adjust the screw with your thumb and forefinger. It's warm, but doesn't get much easier than that.
 

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Loosen the side panel, have someone hold the bottom out for you, then stick your right hand in there and adjust the screw with your thumb and forefinger. It's warm, but doesn't get much easier than that.
Depending on the crash bars that you have installed, your method is easier said than done.





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I've got hands like pork chops, there's no way they will fit in the hole to touch the screw. I employ a guy with little hands and it is easy for him to adjust--you just need his co-operation.
Henry, I need to look at your allen head conversion.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks fellas. Yeah, my crash bars are on the same plane as the adjustment screw. Plus I have giant hands. I will have to find the right angle screw driver then.

So the thread pitch is the main issue then. I couldn't imagine it is any different than the idle adjust screw but I trust your word.
 

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The idle adjust screw may be the same size.

I started a thread with this same idea three years ago--NOT!

Part of the issue is that the part that the adjustment screw is attached to moves relative to the throttle body (if I remember correctly) therefore if you attach something to the screw then it has to move around.

I can't seem to locate the thread...

Here it is, but I didn't start it...




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I have a phillips screwdriver about two feet long that reaches this screw easily with the tank mounted and propped up. I think it was about $5 at Menards.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just finished reading that thread. Thanks for finding it.

2 foot screw driver...that can come in handy anyway. I assume you attack it from the front of the bike under the controls.

What about a piece of fuel like and a hose clamp? Just do the work getting it on there and leave it tucked in all the time. Reach in and grab it (along with the vac line extenders) and twist left or right?
 

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Do you think they go out of sync because this screw moves?
I think that's the main cause. I haven't done the sync enough to be sure yet, but mine had backed out which makes sense as it vibrates the spring pressure pushes the screw in that direction. I think somebody's idea of using nail polish as a light thread locker might be a good idea.

I used a very long pair of forceps I picked up at Harbor Freight. It works OK but I'd like a better method. At least with the extended vacuum tubes I didn't have to remove anything to do it, that was nice.

I don't quite understand how the very long screwdriver works, I must be missing something there.
 

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So I hate the process of stripping off the tank and airbox to get to the set screw on the TBS synch. Yeah, I know, you can get some really long needle nose pliers and if your crash bars aren't in the way, you can adjust without having to remove the tank. Well, not for me. My Hepco & Becker bars get right in the way.

I got to thinking; has anyone taken the same assembly for the idle adjustment screw, attached it to the synch screw and mounted it somewhere for easier access? Seems to me that in combination with the vacuum line extensions, this would make for the easiest time adjusting the TBS.
Throttle body sync is not a fun project and is certainly not as easy as some Stromtroopers would have you think. I assume that you have the vacuum hoses hooked up already and brought out to a location that you can get a manometer hooked up to. If that's the case, you need to lift the rear of the tank, take off the boomerang and the right side plastic that says v-strom on it. To get to the adjustment screw (it's the lower one on the TB feeding the front cylinder), you can use the long plier method which I don't find very satisfactory, the long screwdriver method, or buy a Sears Craftsman tool 41380 which is a little knurled cylinder that a phillips screwdriver stub like you buy for drills fits into. Actually, there should be a public lynching of the Suzuki engineers that designed this mess in the first place.
 

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The Go Cart shop next door to my office makes these mixture screws that have a stiff but bendable spring on them and a T nut on the other end for adjusting on the fly I wonder if something like that with a phillips head on the end would work.

Does anyone know the thread pitch size and length of the screw in question.
 

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I just bought the Motion-Pro angled screwdriver and a Harmonizer. They work well for me. My hands are too big reach.
like this one? i'm not sure straight slot would work.

Pilot Screw Adj. Tool

•Designed for those hard-to-reach air/fuel mixture screws on most multi-cylinder motorcycles
Straight-slot blade tip can be rotated by rotating the handle
•Length is 17 inches with a 110 degree angled head to extend reach 1 inch.
•Tip height is adjustable, and can be set in place during use
 

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Discussion Starter #17
like this one? i'm not sure straight slot would work.

Pilot Screw Adj. Tool

•Designed for those hard-to-reach air/fuel mixture screws on most multi-cylinder motorcycles
Straight-slot blade tip can be rotated by rotating the handle
•Length is 17 inches with a 110 degree angled head to extend reach 1 inch.
•Tip height is adjustable, and can be set in place during use
And pilot screws have a much smaller head on them so it might be even worse. There are 90 degree bend screwdrivers...but I need to run out to the bike again and look and see what access is like.

If I can snag the thread pitch, it might be easier to switch it to the 8mm hex Chevy carb adjustment screw. Any parts store has the flexible Chevy adjuster tool for dirt cheap. Dunno, just knocking the idea around.
 

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Loosen the side panel, have someone hold the bottom out for you, then stick your right hand in there and adjust the screw with your thumb and forefinger. It's warm, but doesn't get much easier than that.

YUP!!! I've been doing it that way for years except I use a 9-10" phillips screwdriver propped to hold out the bottom panel out a couple of inches and all it takes is a smidge of a turn one way, read your tubes to see whether you went in the right direction or not, then set it! Takes 10 seconds if that long!!

jeff
 

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Do you think they go out of sync because this screw moves?
Thank you rw, I'm glad you brought that up.
I do agree that the two big cure-all's for any new (or pre-owned) Vee owner are...
1.) Sync the throttle body linkages.
2.) Properly set (and/or replace) the throttle position sender.

But what I do NOT understand is why these things need constant attention?
I have other multi cylinder bikes, but the Vee is the only one that requires more attention than a damn three cylinder 2-stroke! :confused:
Cant help but wonder,
-Ej-
 

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+1 on the MotionPro right-angle screwdriver. I use it w/ my home-made manometer at every oil change. Takes about 15 - 20 minutes and gets the oil nice and warm prior to changing it. I credit the frequent throttle body syncs with the smoothness of the engine throughout the RPM range... but then again maybe I'm just lucky.
 
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