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I started just to change my air filter and ended up installing the TBS hoses. The key to my success was the small hands of my 12 yo grandson , AJ and an odd looking curved set of pliers I got as a three plier set from Harbor Freight.

This is for a 2003 DL 1000. The sources I have are the Procedure Notes for DL650 for Throttle Body Synchronisation by RBS_Cairns and How do I adjust my throttle bodies from the vstrom forum. Some of the pics on the Cairns notes don't match what I could find on my 1000. I am not sure if it is because of the difference between the 1000 and the 650.

The removal of the gas tank was done to get access to the air filter. It had nothing to do with any instructions I have read about the TB hose installation. Although the tank removal helped in getting some good pictures of the TB connections.

Some of the pic are from a previous set about the fairing removal.

After the tank removed



This is the right side of bike. The pencil is point to the rear TB connection.



Another closer look at the rear TB connector.



Another close look at the rear connector with the hose attached. The wooden pointer tip is touching the hose.



The pliers used to install the hose.







The front TB is access while looking up under the bike like this.

This is AJ adding hose to front TB



This looking up at the front TB with black rubber cap on .



This is pic with blue arrow marking hose on TB connection



Next I route the hoses to the right side on the bike. I use plastic connectors and the black rubber caps to seal the hose.



Now I think I have the hoses connected to the TB correctly.

Next is to find the Balancing screw. The Cairns pic of the screw looks like this,


Is this it ?



Pic further back



Based on the description in the Vstrom Wiki

"located on right side of bike, on the front TB."


I borrowed a TwinMax from Chuck, Gilk51 , and will test how well I understand the process. Wish be luck cause I need it. If anyone can add to the location of the adjustment screw I would welcome the help.

Also , AJ is for hire if someone in the Arlington Texas area wants this done. It took him less than 10 min to install both hoses. :D

Bill
 

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Thank you very much for taking the time to take and post those pictures!

Very useful!
 

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Just did mine yesterday...used a small ratchet made for screwdriver bits...allows a 90 deg angle and very low profile. The best part is it allows very fine tuning...using coloured water in a home-made manometer, I got the levels to line up perfectly!
 

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3/16" vacuum hose from the local automotive shop. Internal diameter ~ 4mm. Other notes:

- I recommend longer lengths (1 1/2') to route them up and away from the engine block.
- I wasn't able to get the spring clamps back on, so used zip ties.
- I put a few drops of red food coloring in water for the homemade manometer. Those tube lengths were so long that it would only be sucked up if I am completely careless.
 

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If you already have the tank off it only take a few minutes to remove the air cleaner, gives you a better view of the whole system, and you can adjust the TB with a screwdriver.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
805gregg said:
If you already have the tank off it only take a few minutes to remove the air cleaner, gives you a better view of the whole system, and you can adjust the TB with a screwdriver.
OK, I thought in order to sync the TB that the bike had to be in operating mode. The engine is running and the valves properly adjusted, air cleaner in place and you adjust the TB as you vary the RPM range while monitoring the sync tool, manometer or TwinMax and adjust as needed. That’s why I took the time to install the TB sync hoses. How can the bike be running without the tank and air cleaner in place. Did I miss something. :?


Please help me out here . Pretend I am from Missouri (the show me state) and show what you are saying can happen. A link to a site that details this process would be wonderful. :D

I am always looking for a better way to work on my bike.

Bill
 

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What I'm hearing (reading) is that it's easier to get to the nipples with the airbox removed.

When I do the sync, I just lift the tank which allows me to get to the screw and I adjust it while the bike is running.

I haven't removed the tank (to remove the airbox) and haven't disconnected anything else. It was tough to get to the nipples, but the front one can be done with just your hands, and I used a screwdriver to pry the rear one off (from the right side of the bike).
 

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Quick question for you guys. I made the yard stick manometer using tranny fluid. When I tried to sync them up, they would line up perfectly and I would blip the throttle. As soon as I let it idle, the fluid would start creeping,(sometimes a fast creep :shock: ) way out of sync.
Is that normal?

Jeremy
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I also tried the manometer thing. The TB were way off. It took me two full turns before they lined up. Once they fluid lined up it didn't matter if it was in idle or 5000 rpm the fluid stayed level. I thought it worked very well.

Bill
 

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Purpose of screw?

I found the adjustment screw right where I left it. :D



I will use a long set of pliers to adjust the screw.

Can anybody tell me what the function of the above pictured screw is? (The horizontal one at the left; not the TBS synch screw.)

I'm trying to synch the throttle bodies on my V, and mistakenly assumed that was the idle speed adjustment. It does affect the idle speed for sure, but I later discovered the proper screw to adjust is the really obvious one on the left side of the bike. (That's what reading the manual will do for you. :???: ) I had to speed up the idle because the idle really dropped while synchronizing.

The balance was way out (16 inches or so above and below level, using ATF). I had to turn the synch screw clockwise quite a bit, maybe half a turn to get it close. It seems that the idle speed really makes a difference to the synching as well. A difference of 100 RPM can totally change the vacuum balance.
 

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Can anybody tell me what the function of the above pictured screw is? (The horizontal one at the left; not the TBS synch screw.)

Larolco
That screw is called the throttle linkage stop screw, with the engine off set the clearence on that screw at .31 mm or .012 thousands make this adjustment before you sync the throttle bodys. Usually correct from the factory and seldom needs adjustment unless it is turned in error. As you have found out it does affect the idle and makes sync'ing the throttle bodys difficult, also if set too tight sometimes the engine will spit back through the front TB.
 

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Many thanks

Thank you very much, Mortaine.

I appreciate the info.

Actually, I reset it by guess and by golly, and re-did the TBS. I think I've got it pretty close. When I hooked the manometer back up, it was way out in the opposite direction from the first adjustment. Certainly runs better after the second adjustment (an added benefit -- no pinging anymore).

It was stalling and making some rather disconcerting clunking noises from a cold start with the "throttle linkage stop screw" out of adjustment.

Now, I just have to wait for it to cool down and try another cold start to be sure.

First, though, I'll get out my feeler gauges and see how close I got it.

Thanks again. It's folks like you that make this forum such a wonderful resource. ;)
 

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Curses! I just put my bike back together.

Thanks for the bump, though. The Vee and Wee engines are different enough to be confusing. The pictures are great because I didn't understand how the hose extensions were suppose to work.
 

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TBS summary

I had planned to post a whole bunch of pics, documenting the process on a V, but it seems posting photos is an entirely seperate kettle of fish. I'm still figuring that one out. In any case, all the info is out there, just not in one spot. Once I figure out how to post photos efficiently, I'll start a new thread so everyone can find them easily.

For those who are thinking about doing a TBS on their own, I can say it really is a straightforward and relatively simple process, provided you know which screws to turn and you have a couple of useful tools like a long pair of needlenose pliers for adjusting the sync screw (sorry Mortaine :oops: ) and perhaps a hemostat (scissor-like, ratcheting plier-type thingies that look like they should come with a nurse to hand them to you while you clamp off an artery during open-heart surgery) to help installing the vacuum lines.

Though I took the entire fairing and gas tank off, that's really not necessary, especially the second time around, when you've already got the vacuum hoses installed. I wanted to take everything apart just out of curiosity. Removing the tank is a snap, though I did lose some fuel (I left the tank off overnight), so I would recommend putting the fuel line in a bucket or something if you're worried about spillage (half a cup at the most). It is useful to remove the left-side fairing to help with the vacuum hose installation. The right-side fairing pretty much has to come off to allow access to the sync screw. If you haven't taken the fairing off before, be gentle and look for hidden screws. I could imagine someone missing the 4 phillips-head screws at the very front of the fairing and snapping the plastic.

As for the home-built manometer, it's a crude instrument and need not be precision crafted. All it is is a clear plastic tube (1/4" ID worked fine) routed in a 'U' shape with coloured fluid (ATF worked well for me) collected in the bottom half of the 'U'. I poured it in through a tiny funnel with no fuss at all. I made mine about 60 inches high because I happened to have a scrap piece of plywood that size. I've seen photos of manometers built around yardsticks, but you don't actually have to measure anything; you're just trying to get the two columns of fluid to be at the same level. Don't worry about sucking fluid into the engine. You'd have to be entirely incompetent to do that, and that would be a good indication you shouldn't be riding a bike anyway. Seriously, the fluid doesn't climb quickly at all ('creeps' is more like it). Just make sure you've left 15 or 20 inches of tube for it to climb and that's plenty (that also means you need an equal distance for the other side to drop...)

First, adjust the idle-speed to 1100-1300 rpm using the highly-obvious phillips-head screw on the left side of the bike. It's mounted to the frame for easy access and your owner's manual shows you where it is anyway. It's green on my bike.

Then, shut the engine down, hook up the manometer to the vacuum hose extensions, fire the beast up and start adjusting the TBS screw (right side of bike, under the airbox, off the front throttle body) until the two columns are level. It's a vertical screw to the right of a horizontal screw and below a screw at an angle.:rolleyes:

When you're done, make sure you cap the vacuum hose extensions, otherwise you'll have a vacuum leak, which would defeat the whole purpose of the TBS.

Happy TBSing.
 

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Yep, the yardstick device is freaking excellent.

I found that you gotta give it a second to settle each time you adjust and make sure you're maintaining the idle at the right spot. After a bit of jiggering (Idle, sync, idle, blip, wait, repeat) you should find that it'll stabilize itself pretty well.
 
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