StromTrooper banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Thinking of getting the Bags-Connection "Daypack II" tank bag - my main requirement is to put my Nikon DLSR (with 18-200 lens) and maybe a small bottle of water.
Does any have success with that configuration?
The tank bag looks a bit small, not sure the DSLR and lens would fit.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I would be concerned with vibration when the camera is on the tank like that. You don't want your mirror assembly or lens getting damaged from prolonged exposure to vibration.

Just my $0.02

... and first post... so you can possibly ignore me. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would be concerned with vibration when the camera is on the tank like that. You don't want your mirror assembly or lens getting damaged from prolonged exposure to vibration.

Just my $0.02

... and first post... so you can possibly ignore me. ;)
First post..congrats :)

Well, regd. vibrations - it is a valid point. But the DL650 doesn't have that many vibrations.
I was thinking of putting the camera in some foam to hold it - the foam would suppress most of the vibrations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I've been trying to solve this same delimma myself. A tank bag is ideal because it's right in front of you where you can easily access your camera when you need it.

The downside is vibration as Darkstar mentioned, and also the possibility of the tank bag getting launched in a crash or falling off on a lay down. I'm leaning more toward putting mine in the trunk, secured in a load of foam rubber as you mentioned. It's much more secure, padded much better, but you've got to get off of the bike to access the camera.

I've considered something like a small Givi hard bag attached to the crash bars. Assuming that the hard bag could be padded well enough and assuming the bag will not collapse in a drop this might be an option which would allow the camera to be easily accessible.

My cameras get used a lot while hiking and camping, so they do get a few small bumps, but I do worry that a constant vibration, however slight, might loosen screws and adhesives in the body.

If you make a decision or find a solution that you like please post photos. I'm still pondering this and there are probably solutions that I haven't yet considered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've been trying to solve this same delimma myself. A tank bag is ideal because it's right in front of you where you can easily access your camera when you need it.

The downside is vibration as Darkstar mentioned, and also the possibility of the tank bag getting launched in a crash or falling off on a lay down. I'm leaning more toward putting mine in the trunk, secured in a load of foam rubber as you mentioned. It's much more secure, padded much better, but you've got to get off of the bike to access the camera.

I've considered something like a small Givi hard bag attached to the crash bars. Assuming that the hard bag could be padded well enough and assuming the bag will not collapse in a drop this might be an option which would allow the camera to be easily accessible.

My cameras get used a lot while hiking and camping, so they do get a few small bumps, but I do worry that a constant vibration, however slight, might loosen screws and adhesives in the body.

If you make a decision or find a solution that you like please post photos. I'm still pondering this and there are probably solutions that I haven't yet considered.
It is a dilemma, nobody wants to trash $2000+ of optical equipment..
But the Day Pack II is connected to the center of the tank and is narrow, so I don't think it would fall or at least be more exposed to the road, then say side of the tank. That's why I plan to get crash bars next season (can't do it all in one year).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I use a sling bag similar to the lowpro slingshot 100AW. This carries the camera on my back, isolated from the worst of the vibrations, and I can swing the bag around and access my camera very quickly. If you have never used a sling bag, you are missing out in general.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,735 Posts
If you want to take a DSLR that's fine. Put it in your tail bag and use it when you stop. Get a small point-and-shoot for use at other times and keep it in the tank bag. That's the approach I've been using for the past 3 years and it works just fine for me.

I'm not interested in putting one of my SLR's in a tank bag. They are too easily stolen and too easily broken there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
@Darkstar: It is a nice idea, but I really don't want any weight on my back.

If you want to take a DSLR that's fine. Put it in your tail bag and use it when you stop. Get a small point-and-shoot for use at other times and keep it in the tank bag. That's the approach I've been using for the past 3 years and it works just fine for me.

I'm not interested in putting one of my SLR's in a tank bag. They are too easily stolen and too easily broken there.
I hear you, makes sense - I do have my android for these tasks. But my Nikon is a much better camera, and if every time I want to shoot I need get the DSLR out is not going to happen, so I will end up not doing it at all..
Here's a photo from my android: (this last weekend to Rhode Island)
It is not bad, but I could have done better with a DSLR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
@Darkstar: It is a nice idea, but I really don't want any weight on my back.
I can't deny you notice it after a couple of hours. Its not bad, but you know its there. I carry the body and two lenses, an extra battery, 2 extra CF cards, and 2 or 3 filters. Its probably 5 or 6 pounds all said and done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I can't deny you notice it after a couple of hours. Its not bad, but you know its there. I carry the body and two lenses, an extra battery, 2 extra CF cards, and 2 or 3 filters. Its probably 5 or 6 pounds all said and done.
The days of carrying weight around my body all day long have officially ended when I left the army..weight on the back for me is anti-fun. I'd rather not ride :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,735 Posts
I hear you, makes sense - I do have my android for these tasks. But my Nikon is a much better camera, and if every time I want to shoot I need get the DSLR out is not going to happen, so I will end up not doing it at all..
My Android-based phone takes decent photos as well, but either of my DSLR's will blow it out of the water. I carry a Sony DSC-H9 in my tank bag when I travel and use that for quick photos. When I stop for the express purpose of taking photos I will get my DSLR out.

If I didn't have a decent point-and-shoot, I'd probably get one that was completely waterproof. They are getting quite inexpensive these days, and having pretty much all-weather capabilities (without the worries) would be really handy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I use a sling bag similar to the lowpro slingshot 100AW.QUOTE]

I do have a sling bag that I use, but I don't think I'd like to wear it on my bike. It's just a personal choice, I'd prefer not to have the weight on my shoulder and back, plus it does shift once in awhile.

I'm not trying to hijack BigMan's thread, but I've also given thought to a smaller camera in the tank bag but my main interest in photography is wildlife. Can anyone recommend a compact camera which works well for wildlife? Instant on, (nearly) instant focus, instant fire when the shutter release is pressed, and a decent zoom range? I'm not asking for much here. :mrgreen:

To me that is probably the best solution. Keep the expensive stuff well protected in a hard bag and have a compact accessible in the tank bag. Unfortunately most of the compacts I've looked at in the past were lacking. Ideas? Recommendations?

BigMan, you're saying that this particular bag you're looking at has straps to secure it to the tank? If so, I'd be a bit more comfortable with that than I would be with only a magnet mount. I'd still want to pad the heck out of it just in case.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,735 Posts
... Can anyone recommend a compact camera which works well for wildlife? Instant on, (nearly) instant focus, instant fire when the shutter release is pressed, and a decent zoom range? I'm not asking for much here. :mrgreen:
I like my old Sony H9 and the H10 is better. The Canon G-10 is very good in decent light, but I've always disliked the performance of Canon point-and-shoot cameras in dim light (even more so than most P&S digitals). I've seen some very decent shots taken with the Panasonic Lumix series, same for the Nikon Cool Pix series.

They aren't going to be fast-on, or have little to no shutter lag. I haven't seen one that meets those criteria. Focus hunting is still pretty slow on some of them to. My H9 fails all three of those categories, but it is relatively small, has decent glass, and takes decent photos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
BigMan, you're saying that this particular bag you're looking at has straps to secure it to the tank? If so, I'd be a bit more comfortable with that than I would be with only a magnet mount. I'd still want to pad the heck out of it just in case.
The particular tank I'm looking at hooks up the the fuel ring, so it is not magnetic nor straps - that's why I like it.

TwistedThrottle.com : Bags-Connection "Daypack II" Quick-Lock Tankbag for SW-MOTECH Gascap Mounting System - BC.TRS.00.008.8000
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
I'm not interested in putting one of my SLR's in a tank bag. They are too easily stolen and too easily broken there.
They're also too big. The high zoom Sony is usually what rides in my tank bag. DSC-HX1 or H50.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
The particular tank I'm looking at hooks up the the fuel ring, so it is not magnetic nor straps - that's why I like it.
Thanks for the link. I like the bag, but I still wouldn't be comfortable carrying my DSLR in it. It's a Canon with their 100-400mm zoom normally attached. Big, bulky, and heavy.

I do like the attachment of that bag, and may have to consider one in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I've seen some very decent shots taken with the Panasonic Lumix series, same for the Nikon Cool Pix series.

They aren't going to be fast-on, or have little to no shutter lag. I haven't seen one that meets those criteria. Focus hunting is still pretty slow on some of them to. My H9 fails all three of those categories, but it is relatively small, has decent glass, and takes decent photos.
You're right. I love Canon's SLRs but their compacts leave much to be desired. I've never tried the Lumix series but have read favorable reviews. Nikon compacts, well, unfortunately I've had several of them crap out just after the warranty expires and I don't know that I could pull the trigger on another one.

I think on this topic I'm just going to have to accept the idea of carrying a good compact in the tank bag and storing the DSLR in the trunk if I want to take it. It's just too much of an investment to risk.

Thanks for the input folks. BigMan, if you find a solution to this please fill us in.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
You're right. I love Canon's SLRs but their compacts leave much to be desired.
I've taken some great shots with the G10, G11, and the S90.

The D10 is waterproof/bugproof/glove friendly and it rides on a handlebar mount sometimes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
The Bags-Connection bags have a hard plastic interior plate that the upper quick-lock mounting hardware bolts into. The bag is concave on the bottom so this isn't readily apparent in the photos.

I don't know how big this camera is of yours but I just checked and my old Ricoh SLR, a couple lenses and the flash unit easily fit into my unexpanded bag. I wouldn't ride with them there with out padding the heck out of it, though.

I don't ride with that camera anymore but when I used to, I kept it in it's camera case in a top zippered tail bag that was secured to the pillion. Wasn't as difficult to get at as it sounds like it should be.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,735 Posts
I've taken some great shots with the G10, G11, and the S90.

The D10 is waterproof/bugproof/glove friendly and it rides on a handlebar mount sometimes.
I think the Canon P&S cameras take great images as long as the light is good. I've never owned one but a good friend loves them and has had several. From what I've seen in her photos their low-light performance is not as good as other brands. Has that been your experience with them?
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top