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Discussion Starter #1
My new-to-me 2012 650 has a pretty “bouncy” ride. I’m about 190 geared up. I am aware of ESP in La Crescenta and another dirt oriented place in Santa Clarita. Any other recommendations?
Thanks
Kyle


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Installing the parts that "fix" the suspension is rather straight forward.

Getting the correct parts and the correct guidance for installing them is still the biggest problem. Most "shops" are not really qualified to tell you exactly what you need. That takes research and they don't want to spend time doing that.

I would contact some suspension suppliers and ask what they recommend. Stuff like the cartridge emulators for the front forks, what oil weight to run in them and what other modifications need to be done to the forks when installing the new parts ( including springs ). Then there is the rear shock. When upgrading the front it can make the rear seem worse than it was. There are places you can send your stock shock off for upgrading ( Daugherty motorsports ) or you can buy any number of aftermarket ready to bolt on shocks.

Get those decisions and parts in order, then find a shop that will install them correctly. It just needs to be a shop that will do the job correctly and not make shortcuts.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Installing the parts that "fix" the suspension is rather straight forward.

Getting the correct parts and the correct guidance for installing them is still the biggest problem. Most "shops" are not really qualified to tell you exactly what you need. That takes research and they don't want to spend time doing that.

I would contact some suspension suppliers and ask what they recommend. Stuff like the cartridge emulators for the front forks, what oil weight to run in them and what other modifications need to be done to the forks when installing the new parts ( including springs ). Then there is the rear shock. When upgrading the front it can make the rear seem worse than it was. There are places you can send your stock shock off for upgrading ( Daugherty motorsports ) or you can buy any number of aftermarket ready to bolt on shocks.

Get those decisions and parts in order, then find a shop that will install them correctly. It just needs to be a shop that will do the job correctly and not make shortcuts.
Good advice Terry, thanks. I agree that getting the right advice on parts is the most important. A few years ago, using the Racetech calculator, I replaced the front and rear springs on my old DRZ. After doing so I discovered the new front springs were way too stiff and went back to the stock ones. Simply a stiffer rear spring made a big improvement and the bike felt pretty balanced. I have tools and am capable of swapping things out. I'm also lazy and would kind of like to just hand the bike off to someone. I'll do some research and see what other advice comes up here. Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Interesting. Looking at the RaceTech calculator it is recommending increasing the spring rate, front and rear, by about 50%.
Front stock- .65 kg/mm
Front recommend - .917
Rear stock- 8.2
Rear recommend- 12.8
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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Discussion Starter #8
Leaning heavily toward Daugherty Motorsports. Seems like a great option and the best value I've found so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Pulled the rear shock and shipped it off for the upgrade today. Nothing to do but wait for it to return along with the new fork springs kit.
Sigh...
 
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