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Discussion Starter #1
I bottomed out the bike and scuffed my bash plate.. I am a heavy dude , what and how is one to go about setting up the suspension the the rider..
Any good tutorials for the vee2.
 

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man that would be a lot to typing
look up "setting sag" on youtube
very easy and absolute first thing you should do when buying any bike
it will likely improve the ride significantly
 

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Hi Ron? I love that you,re OCMD ;) I reckon I'm OCMR! ;)
Very basically,on the top of each front fork there is a nut with a screwdriver slot sticking out of its middle.The nut may be red or black, look below the nut and you,ll see a faint spiral going around. This is the Pre-load (it's in the owners manual) Turn these nuts a few turns Clockwise so you halve the number of spirals visible.Do this for each fork.
For the rear, locate the knob on the Lh side between the pillion peg and the main bike frame. Turn it clockwise till you hear a "Click". Keep turning it for 5 or 6 clicks.
You have now increased the preload to 3/4 of maximum. Factory is set at 1/2 way.
Go for a ride . If the suspension feels too stiff you can back each adjustment off a turn and a few clicks, or if you prefer you can add more turns or clicks.
You,ll run out of clicks (from the middle- after 10 or 11 . ie 20-22 from min to maximum.
I think there might be 6 or 8? turns available on the preload? read the manual first to confirm.
Nexy you have dampning to play with- compression and rebound.. I cant comment on that- as I,ve not yet to found it necessary to experiment with!
 

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Depending on how "heavy" you are, you may need to get a set of springs for the forks and get a new shock or a re-sprung shock with spring rates that will support you and the bike better. Starting with the spring preload and stiffening up the comp and rebound settings is of course the first thing you can try. Most Japanese bikes are sprung for 160-170 lb riders! I think the V2 is probably better than that, but the stock springs will have limits no matter how far your crank up the preload.
 

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I had the suspension set by an race/engineering company. I weigh 225 and they said the rear needed to be set to near-max preload. Disconcerting in that I usually travel with another 40lbs of luggage. I've ordered .95kg springs for the front and an Elka shock for the rear. Not installed yet but I'm hoping for great things.
 

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Contrary to popular option, setting the sag with the preload adjusters does very little to make the suspension harsh/stiff or soft. What is actually does is to raise or lower the suspension so it has equal chance to avoid topping out or bottoming out.

You want about 40mm sag from wheel-in-the-air to you sitting on the bike in full gear. Use the same 40mm for front and rear. Readjust as the suspension breaks in and frees up.

Front...put a cable tie around the inner fork tube. With the front tire in the air, slide the tie against the seal. Get on the bike, center it, jiggle a bit to settle the suspension. Get off. Measure how much it was pushed down. If it is less than 40 mm, lossen the preload adjusters. Tighten if more than 40. Try again. If you can't get to 40mm difference, contact Rich Desmond at Sonic Springs for springs that suit your loaded riding weight. Changing the springs on the DL1000A with the inverted forks is probably a professional job.

Rear...you want a helper. Raise the rear tire off the surface. Measure from the axle to a point on the fender. Get on, jiggle, measure. Adjust the rear preload adjusters to get to about 40mm difference.

The forks have compression (rate of compression) and rebound (rate of extension) damping adjusters. The rear has a rebound damping adjuster. I loosened the front compression adjusters two clicks at a time on a bumpy road until it felt mushy, then tightened them one click until it felt good. I loosened the front rebound adjusters until it felt bouncy, then tightened until they felt good. Ditto for the rear rebound adjuster.

Readjust everything as the suspension breaks in.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah it bottomed out while turning off of Main Road on to a paved Side Road the drop-off from one road to another was about a foot-and-a-half so she slammed pretty hard when I went around that corner little sketchy but nothing major happened just thought maybe a little more spring might help in that sort of situation
 

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I weigh 180lbs and have not bottomed out yet, even fully loaded it seems fine, but then I haven't dropped a foot and a half off a road either. Maybe try not to do that and your fine? ;)

Lots of good information on setting up suspension in this thread.

This is my bike fully loaded.

 
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