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Anyone of you guys adjusted their sag on there vstrom1000. Just adjusted mine on my 2018 xt. Followed the 30% rule almost on every suspension site I know. Did you go that way? I know that I'm not light weight 225..but the front suspension is almost cranked up to the max.
 

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I’m coming off a CTX1300 with not much travel, my new left over 2015 V2 feels like a dirt bike in comparison. I’m riding at whatever it was set at when it left the dealer. I don’t even slow down for the road humps, I just float over them at speed
 

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I weigh 225 and the front is still on factory setting of 3, cranked the rear up from 2 to almost 3. Getting 40mm total sag and feels good on the road. (2016 wee.)
 

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I don't want to insult anyone, but just to make sure everyone is on the same page...total rider sag is measured from the suspension fully extended, to the compression with bike and rider. That means you have to unload the suspension with a head stand, center stand, straps, etc. for the measurement. (Or pull up on it while a partner measures.) There's also a method to help compensate for stiction where you take two compressed readings and average them: for one you pull up and then let down slowly, for the other you push down and let up slowly. I usually just bounce it a few times and measure where it stops. After my V2 broke in a bit (maybe around the first oil change) I set the front and rear sag to 45 mm. I checked and set again about a year after that and noted that the preload is just about maxed out, I weigh around 200 with gear, so not unusual that you would be maxed out at 225. Going by this, if you were carrying luggage and/or a passenger, you would probably want to look into a new rear spring or spring and shock. It doesn't affect sag, but as a side note I raised my forks 10mm to help make turn-in easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't want to insult anyone, but just to make sure everyone is on the same page...total rider sag is measured from the suspension fully extended, to the compression with bike and rider. That means you have to unload the suspension with a head stand, center stand, straps, etc. for the measurement. (Or pull up on it while a partner measures.) There's also a method to help compensate for stiction where you take two compressed readings and average them: for one you pull up and then let down slowly, for the other you push down and let up slowly. I usually just bounce it a few times and measure where it stops. After my V2 broke in a bit (maybe around the first oil change) I set the front and rear sag to 45 mm.
Used that method. To get the theorixal 48 mm. In the rear no prblem...it's the fork that's max out. In the rear it looks like I might have some margin to crank it a little bit more.

I was wondering, hows the driving after that adjustement is it really harsh. Didn't get to try it yet,started to rain a before I even finished putting my tools away. And it's suppose to be pouring for 2 days... ?
 

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So i lost 30 lbs (was approx 195 down to 167 lbs) and now the ride is stiff. should i turn to the left or right on the front forks to get back to that soft suspension sweet spot?
 

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Right = stiff, left = soft.
 

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Yep, 25%-30% sag works well. Just bear in mind V-Stroms have a good bit more total suspension travel than yer average streetbike. (About 6 inches, IIRC, 150-ish mm total.)

Following their longstanding tradition, Suzuki provides employment for particularly emaciated Japanese ballerinas and jockeys as suspension calibration test riders. I've seen stock bikes that sag through half their suspension travel under the weight of the bike before a rider clambers aboard.

Anyway, if you're much over 150 pounds, or if you ever carry more than a small ham sandwich, you'll very likely need to upgrade springs front and rear at the least.

You can crank up preload to make the bike a bit more rideable and get sag in the ballpark, but most riders are still dealing with overly soft spring rates. Overall, upgrading suspension is the best money you'll ever spend.
 

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For total sag I typically use 28-29% of actual (not claimed) suspension travel. Actual is always a bit less than claimed, because the spec travel includes compressing the topout springs completely, which is not a real world situation.
On the first gen Stroms actual travel is ~140mm, so 40mm is a good sag number.
It's important to realize that just because you can get to a "good" sag number, that doesn't mean your suspension is ok. Bikes with very soft springs often are setup from the factory with a lot of static preload, and because of that have total sag numbers that look reasonable. The ratio of bike sag to total sag will tell the true story.

In general, more than a little bit of preload is bad, because it causes a step function in the forks compressibility whenever the fork is topped out. All that preload force has to be overcome in order for the fork to start moving again, which sends a large quick jolt to the chassis.The goal in choosing a spring rate is to have a spring stiff enough to prevent bottoming while using a minimum amount of preload, but soft enough to let the suspension use all it's travel.
 

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Assuming i'm a total noob to motorcycles and suspensions, been riding for just over a year and had my 07 1000DL for about 10 months, how do I adjust the front suspension?
 

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Assuming i'm a total noob to motorcycles and suspensions, been riding for just over a year and had my 07 1000DL for about 10 months, how do I adjust the front suspension?
Use the preload adjusters to set the sag to 40mm:

Setting Sag

Without buying any new parts that's really all you can do. Better springs and changes to the damping cartridges are needed to really make it right.
 

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I guess I'm not much of an aggressive rider. I like the suspension soft. I find it makes the seat more bearable for longer rides.
 
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