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I'm sure there are a lot of threads about this already, but I'm looking for a fast and simple technique to adjust my suspension based on my weight/riding style. Right now it feels kind of like I'm getting the worst of both worlds, it is very rough on the bumps but I still can scrape the pegs if I get after it or ride 2-up. Any upgrades you would suggest that aren't ridiculously expensive? Thanks
 

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Google is your friend there are categories here and at vsri

Don't be lazy

Oh and the answer is springs, fork brace, emulators ....
 

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Ive seen several suspension tutorials on you tube that cover it. Most have you measure the sag against the total travel. I did that on my vee and found it in spec despite my 250#. That being said, I am sure the bike would handle better if I started changing hardware.
 

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The quick answer is to adjust the sag f&r to around 35mm. This is the difference in suspension height from fully extended (ie no weight on that wheel at all) to the rider sitting in the normal riding position, with full gear on. This is quite easy to do if you have someone to help you, and a centre stand helps.

There are lots of tutorials on youtube - search for set suspension sag
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The long legged Stroms make 40mm a good sag number from full extension.
 

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The first and cheapest suspension upgrade is to buy new front springs that suit your loaded riding weight. $90 to your door.
SonicSprings.com DL650 springs
SonicSprings.com Spring rate calculator

Set the sag to 40 mm with either new or old springs. Riding 2-up, probably just crank the rear preload adjuster all the way up unless you and your pax are featherweights. Return it to your spot for the 40 mm sag when you're riding solo. Don't change the front from your 40 mm setting.

Scraping the pegs may be more a function you how much (if any) you get your body center of mass to the inside of the curve.

Lee Parks on a strom. Forget the knee dragging part. Note how far the yellow emblem on his chest is offset to the inside of the centerline of the bike. Try this--on the straight before a curve move your butt over on the seat toward the direction of the curve (left for a left curve, etc.). Still both hip bones on the seat, but not centered. Swivel your butt on the seat so your right (in this case) knee is against the tank for support. Lean your body to the left (in this case) so the bike is actually leaning to the right while it still goes straight. Now make that left curve. You'll have to lightly pull against the left grip to keep going straight while the bike is canted to the right, then lightly push the left grip to turn left, and pull it back to go straight as you recenter yourself on the bike after the curve, or shift to the other side in preparation for the next curve to the right.



A local Lee Parks' Total Control riding course is great fun and great training.
 

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Wadda Ya want?

The bikes have fairly soft springs, so they ride pretty nice. The footpegs are low to provide a more comfortable riding position. The OEM suspension parts are cheap to keep overall costs down. The bike isn't a sport bike. To fine-tune the suspension you'll need fully adjustable dampers front and rear. The springs will also likely need to be changed. Just curious, but have you lubed the rear suspension links recently, and changed your fork oil in the last year or two? Of course, lowering links will drop ground clearance if you happen to have/use those. I'm guessing you can make it handle better in the twisties with more ground clearance, stiffer springs, and stiffer damping, and a fork brace, but that flexy frame is going to limit ultimate performance. Or you can make it ride nicer with the soft springs, less preload, and perhaps a little less compression damping. Doubt you'll get both. Or you can trade it in for a $20K BMW which electronically senses and changes these parameters on the fly. You get what you pay for. Be advised that suspension changes and adjustments are not for the inexperienced. You could spend a pile of money on new parts, and without the correct adjustments, make little positive improvement.
 
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