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Discussion Starter #1
While I was riding to the store tonight, I smelled oil smoldering and felt my rear tire slipping a little when I was about 600 yards from my destination. After arriving, I found oil all over the left side of my swing-arm, the left side of my rear wheel and tire, and all over the rear mudguard (with minimal oil on the chain itself). Oil was dripping from the crankcase at three points, plus dripping down the kick-stand. About 2-3 ml of oil leaked out as I was inspecting the bike. After spending about 45 minutes in the store, no more than one additional ml of oil was on the ground, and nothing was actively dripping at that time.

I rode the bike home, and observed similar leak volumes after parking the bike.

The bike is parked on the street, it's night, and it's raining, so I haven't investigated the leak's source yet.

But other than the counter-shaft seal and clutch oil seal, are there any oil lines or other known failure points I should be looking at tomorrow?
 

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The first thing I would check would be the rear shock. My 09 Wee had similar symptoms. I fitted a second hand one from an 06 two months ago and no more problems.


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We had the countershaft seal on a 07 go bad causing the same type of leak. First place I would look again.
 
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Oil migrates in weird ways, it isn't always obvious where a leak is from, but yeah other than a rear shock going bad, I say counter shaft seal or clutch rod push seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, the sun came out today, so I cleaned off the rear shock link and bounced the bike a few times, and didn't see any new leaks.

Then I pulled the chain cover off and started the bike. After a few seconds, oil started pouring out from behind the front sprocket in a steady stream. Well, that was a quick diagnosis.

Now, is this going to be a quick fix at the dealer, or is it going to be something more expensive where it makes sense for me to do it myself? I think I'll need to buy a 36mm socket, OIL SEAL 36X50X (09283-36003), and O RING (D:2.4,ID:23.7) (09280-24010), but is there anything else I will need?
 

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32mm (or 1-1/4"), not 36mm. The sprocket nut is not easy to get off. Many people use an impact wrench. A long breaker bar with a pipe extension is another option.

There's a helpful tutorial online.

Good luck. Let us know how it goes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Look here: https://www.vstrom.info/Smf/index.php/topic,7571.0.html
And here: https://blacklabadventures.com/2012/07/22/replacing-a-clutch-pushrod-seal-and-countershaft-seal/

One thing you will need is a looong extension for the socket powerbar, or a rattle gun. That nut in on tight. 105 lb-ft.
32mm (or 1-1/4"), not 36mm. The sprocket nut is not easy to get off. Many people use an impact wrench. A long breaker bar with a pipe extension is another option.

There's a helpful tutorial online.

Good luck. Let us know how it goes.
Thanks for the info. I'll keep you updated.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was finally able to take some time to work on the bike today.

I replaced the countershaft oil seal, the sprocket spacer O-ring, and the clutch pushrod oil seal. It turned out to be a 8:30am to 2pm job, including a half-hour gap to bicycle to the auto parts store for supplies.

The biggest issue was getting to the third 10mm bolt on the oil seal retainer plate. It was too close to the crankcase to get a ratchet socket or the closed end of a mini-wrench on it, and due to the angle forced by the surrounding parts, I couldn't get the open end of the mini-wrench on it solidly enough to break it free without stripping it. I also didn't feel like manufacturing my own tool for it like the Black Lab Adventures guy did. But I did notice that I could get a ratchet socket on it if I removed the magneto cover from the crankcase, so I drained all the oil from the engine and did that. When the time came to put everything back together, I just skipped that problematic bolt and bent the soft steel oil seal retaining plate so that it placed a little tension on the pushrod oil seal area when secured only by the other two bolts. If the absence of the bolt does cause a problem, I'll just Dremel a flathead slot into the bolt and use that to reinstall the bolt.

The other difficult part was getting the old oil seals out. I tried prying them out with a flathead screwdriver, but that did absolutely nothing. I found a hose-puller tool that I had previously made from a bent metal rod, and then I bent another hook into the other end with as small of a radius as possible. The clutch pushrod oil seal then came out relatively easily, needing only four attempts with my tool before popping free. The countershaft oil seal was much more tenacious, needing fifteen minutes of hard pulling, including re-bending my tool twice (since the force needed was straightening out the hook).

I didn't see any obvious damage to any of the seals, except for a little crud on/in the sprocket spacer O-ring. Installing the new seals was quick and easy. Rather than making a tubular seal-pusher tool, I just grabbed a 1/2"-drive extension bar and used a rubber mallet on it to tap the seal in using a circular series of taps until each seal was in flat and at a sufficient depth.

Reinstalling the clutch screw assembly resulted in the clutch lever failing to disengage the clutch. I had to go back to the service manual to figure out how to put it back into adjustment. As far as I can tell, the dealer service department didn't re-seat the clutch cable at the handlebar properly the last time they worked on the bike, and my removing the clutch screw assembly relieved enough cable tension for it to return to its proper position (necessitating my pushrod contact adjustment at the clutch screw assembly). Still, trying to figure out why reinstalling the clutch screw assembly exactly as it was before resulted in the clutch not working just added more time to the job.

Anyway, I finally fired the bike up, took it for a test-ride around the neighborhood, and couldn't detect any leaks. Then I replaced the sprocket cover and rode out to get lunch. No leaks or problems so far! I'll keep this thread updated if any problems do pop up.
 

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I would reinstall the 3rd bolt into the oil seal retainer plate. Who knows what might happen after a few thousand miles?

p.s. I use my 90-degree circlip pliers to remove oil seals. They work great.
 
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