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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some moron stripped both the screws in the front brake reservoir. He looks similar to the idiot I see in the mirror every day.

Ideas or tools as to how to remove them?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Were the heads or threads stripped?
 

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That "mirror guy" can really get a guy into trouble.

A few options:
- use some valve lap compound to try and let the screwdriver get a better 'grip' on the screw
or
- Drill a small hole and use an easy out.
or
- Use a bigger drill bit to remove the screw heads. Remove the cover. Grab the exposed studs with vise grips to remove them.
or
- try one of these (but I would be afraid to hammer hard on the reservoir)
Impact Screwdriver Set with Case

I'm sure you will get a few other suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
GW: it's the head...

Thanks for the great responses, guys...
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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If it is the head, I like the following trick. Use an awl, ice pick or similar tool with a hard, sharp point. Use it with a hammer to make a small dimple on the screw head near the edge. Then tip the tool at about a 30 degree angle and tap it such that the force is applied to turn the screw. It often works and is less likely to make the damage worse. Cutting a slot with a Dremel disk and using a flat bladed screwdriver is another option. If going with a hammer impact tool, hammer the bit alone first to make a better seat for the tip.
 

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I had the same problem on my old Yamaha, except at least I know the moron was the previous owner. My wrenching buddy showed me the hand impact driver technique and it worked great.

If going with a hammer impact tool, hammer the bit alone first to make a better seat for the tip.
This is an excellent tip (no pun intended).
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I used to have a car with alloy aftermarket wheels that had a very long Phillips head screw holding a cover plate over the lug nuts. When I went to get the tires replaced, a tech said they couldn't get the bolts out and asked permission to drill them out. I asked if they had an hammer impact tool and, if so, could I try it. I knew it would be hard to find replacement screws. He said they couldn't get the screws out with that tool but I could try it. I gave each screw a couple of taps with the bit only to seat the bit and shock the screw mountings. After that, they came right out.

The tech said he learned something that day.:beatnik:
 

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If it is the head, I like the following trick. Use an awl, ice pick or similar tool with a hard, sharp point. Use it with a hammer to make a small dimple on the screw head near the edge. Then tip the tool at about a 30 degree angle and tap it such that the force is applied to turn the screw. It often works and is less likely to make the damage worse. Cutting a slot with a Dremel disk and using a flat bladed screwdriver is another option. If going with a hammer impact tool, hammer the bit alone first to make a better seat for the tip.
+1

This is how the professionals do it. In my 40 year career never had a fastener I couldn't get out. True, some ended up being drilled out but more often than not it could be loosened without going that far.

Most common problem with this type damage is using either the wrong type screw driver or just sloppy work practices. If you clean out the hole, get the correct screw bit and tap it in completely there is a good chance you can get it out. The impact type screw drivers work fine on this as they hold the bit in tightly.

As has been pointed out, there are several different designed screws that people lump together as "Philips". The shape and size of the holes are very different. Using the wrong driver in the screw can cause problems as you have found out. The previous abuser may not have been aware of this. You might want to consider getting a good set of screw drivers of the proper design that actually fit the screws on the bike so you can avoid future problems like this. Those bargain sets at Harbor Freight may not be the right ones for the job. My wife kids me about having 'a hundred' screw drivers...which come to think of it, I probably do. :)
 

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There are lots of ways, as noted. I have had luck drilling out screws and bolts with broken-off heads. The only hard part is to get the first (guide) hole exactly in the center, then gradually increase bit size until the sides of the hollowed-out fastener are thin enough to collapse. If you are careful you won't damage the inside threads.

Then dope-slap that idiot in the mirror so he doesn't do that again. He must get around, because every now and then I see him in MY mirror.:mrgreen:
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Most common problem with this type damage is using either the wrong type screw driver or just sloppy work practices.

As has been pointed out, there are several different designed screws that people lump together as "Philips". The shape and size of the holes are very different.
The correct screwdriver is a proper sized JIS tool and not a Phillips at all. Phillips drivers can be make to work when care is taken of course but the fit is not as good.
 
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